1776 Letters

218 Letters written in 1776 from 35 author(s) to 35 people including George Washington , and Abigail Adams from places such as , VA, Lebanon, CT and , QC, CAN.

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  • sponsored content letter to John Adams.

    Williamsburg, VA - 20 May 1776

    Patrick Henry letter to John Adams... Your favor, with the pamphlet, came safe to hand.

  • sponsored contentJohn Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 July 1776

    I was informed, a day or two before the receipt of your letter, that you was gone to Plymouth, by Mrs. Polly Palmer, who was obliging enough, in your absence, to send me the particulars of the expedition to the lower harbor against the men of war.

  • letter to .

    , VA -

    Patrick Henry letter to President and House of Convention... The vote of this day appointing me governor of the commonwealth, has been notified to me in the most polite and obliging manner...

  • letter to .

    , VA -

    Patrick Henry letter to FIRST AND SECOND VIRGINIA REGIMENTS... The high appointment to which my fellow-citizens have called me, was indeed, unmerited, unsolicited.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 1 January 1776

    By accounts received from the various parts of the Colony, the recruiting officers, for the Continental service, have good success in enlisting men.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to David Wooster.

    , QC, CAN - 2 January 1776

    I wrote you, three days since, of our defeat, and the death of General Montgomery and others, with all the information I then had of the matter.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 5 January 1776

    now or never is the time for every virtuous American to exert himself in the cause of liberty and his country ; and that it is become a duty cheer fully to sacrifice the sweets of domestic felicity, to attain the honest, and glorious end America has

  • Benedict Arnold letter to .

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 11 January 1776

    The disposition of the Canadians is very favorable to your wishes ; the only bar of consequence is Quebec. As this is the key, so, in a great measure, it governs the whole country, who having been so long habituated to slavery

  • Benedict Arnold letter to .

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 12 January 1776

    General Wooster has acquainted me he cannot leave Montreal, but has sent down Colonel Clinton, to whom I shall resign the command, until my wound will permit my doing duty

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 13 January 1776

    My amiable friend, the gallant Montgomery, is no more ; the brave Arnold is wounded; and we have met with a severe check in an unsuccessful attempt on Quebec.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 14 January 1776

    Our loss and repulse struck an amazing panic into both officers and men, and, had the enemy improved their advantage, our affairs here must have been entirely ruined.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 15 January 1776

    The condition and circumstances of the Colony of New York give me pain, lest the friends to American liberty in that Colony should be too much neglected and become disheartened

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New Haven, CT - 16 January 1776

    I believe we shall find no difficulties in procuring a sufficient body of volunteers for the New York expedition. The unhappy accounts from Canada seem to animate these people, rather than depress.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 January 1776

    By the inclosed resolutions, you will perceive that the Congress, in providing for the defence of Canada, have directed that two battalions should be raised out of the troops now serving there.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Matthias Ogden.

    New York, NY - 18 January 1776

    There is in man a certain love of novelty; a fondness of variety (useful, indeed, within proper limits), which influences more or less in almost every act of life.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 January 1776

    The Congress are anxious, as Avell from motives of policy as of justice and humanity, to repair our losses in that quarter, and, if possible, to gain possession of Quebec, and drive our enemies out of that country before they can be reinforced in the

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 21 January 1776

    We had procured upwards of an hundred blankets, which were designed for the army under your immediate command; but the descent upon Prudence obliged us to send forty of them to our troops upon that Island

  • David Wooster letter to George Washington.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 21 January 1776

    I herewith inclose a letter just received from Colonel Arnold, and take this opportunity most heartily to condole with you for the loss of the brave and most amiable General Montgomery

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Watertown, NY - 24 January 1776

    I dined at Colonel Mifllin's with the General and lady, and a vast collection of other company, among whom were six or seven sachems and warriors of the French Caghnawaga Indians with several of their wives and children.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to .

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 24 January 1776

    It is very probable the city would surrender before half, or perhaps one quarter, of the shot, shells, &c. in my memorandum were expended; but, if they should make an obstinate resistance, perhaps the whole will be necessary.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 24 January 1776

    I thought fit this morning to acquaint Colonel Burrell, appointed to command the regiment destined to Canada from hence, that a month's pay will be advanced to officers and men by you.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Stamford, CT - 24 January 1776

    I find the people through this Province more alive and zealous than my most sanguine expectation. I believe I might have collected ten thousand volunteers.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 January 1776

    The Congress have received your letter of the 19th instant, and highly commend your prudence and zeal in applying to the Governments of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, and Connecticut, to raise forces for the service of Canada at this exigency.

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Salem, MA - 31 January 1776

    We were therefore induced to try another method, and the Committee of Safety gave the enlisting orders to a worthy man and good soldier who had served as a Lieutenant in the army the last campaign, and offered a month's pay in advance to all who woul

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 0 February 1776

    LEE is at York, and we have requested a battalion of Philadelphia associators, together with a regiment of Jersey minute men, to march to his assistance.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to .

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 1 February 1776

    I have the pleasure of acquainting you, that we still hold our ground before Quebec, and keep the enemy closely blockaded, though we have received but a small reenforcement of one hundred and fifty men from Montreal.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 5 February 1776

    The battalion raising in this Colony, to march to the assistance of our friends at Canada, are enlisted to serve until the 1st of February next, with bounty, pay, wages, and allowances, agreeable to resolve of Congress

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 5 February 1776

    I should apprise you that General Clinton arrived almost at the same instant with myself. lie has brought no troops with him, and pledges his honor that none are coming. he says it is merely a visit to his friend Tryon

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 February 1776

    There is a deep anxiety, a kind of thoughtful melancholy, and in some, a lowness of spirits approaching to despondency, prevailing through the southern colonies, at present, very similar to what I have often observed in Boston

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 12 February 1776

    I am greatly concerned for the scarcity of powder and arms. We have not half a sufficiency for our selves, as the circumstances may be ; yet, anxious to furnish you, for the common good, with every supply in our power

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 14 February 1776

    We have fixed on a -spot in Long Island for a retrenched camp, which I hope will render it impossible for them to get footing on that important Island.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 February 1776

    I SENT you from New York a pamphlet intitled "Common Sense," written in vindication of doctrines, which there is reason to expect, that the further encroachments of tyranny and depredations of oppression will soon make the common faith

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 27 February 1776

    The enemy, to the number of about five hundred, have twice sallied out at Palace Gate, with design of seizing our field-pieces

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 29 February 1776

    What to do with the City, I own, puzzles me. It is so encircled with deep, navigable water, that who ever commands the sea must command the town.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 29 February 1776

    The stripping Ticonderoga so entirely of its heavy cannon, is a most unfortunate circumstance, as the transportation of them from this place is a business of monstrous difficulties, expense, and labor.

  • letter to John Adams.

    Braintree, MA - 2 March 1776

    Abigail Adams letter to John Adams... a most ridiculous story had been industriously propagated in this and the neighbouring towns to injure the cause and blast your reputation...

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 3 March 1776

    As I am the only general officer on the Continent, who can speak and think in French, I confess I think it would have been more prudent to have sent me to Canada; but I shall obey with alacrity, and hope with success.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 March 1776

    The Congress highly approve your care and attention in stopping Lord Drummond's letter, and entirely concur with you in sentiment with regard to his Lordship's officious and unwarrantable zeal.

  • Charles Cornwallis letter to George Germain.

    On Board The Bristol - 7 March 1776

    I take the opportunity of informing your lordship by a homeward-bound ship, that we have stopped for a few minutes, that our voyage hitherto has been very unsuccessful ; the wind has been almost always contrary

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 March 1776

    Your vicinity to such scenes of carnage and desolation as, I fear, are now to be seen in Boston and its environs, will throw you into much distress, but I believe in my conscience, I feel more here than you do.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 March 1776

    I am much pleased with your caution in your letter, in avoiding names both of persons and places, or any other circumstances, which might designate to strangers the writer, or the person written to, or the persons mentioned.

  • Robert Livingston letter to John Jay.

    Claremount - 20 March 1776

    I sympathize most sincerely with you in your melancholy apprehensions about your parents. I know and I can feel such a loss

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Mcdougall.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 March 1776

    I am by no means without my apprehensions of danger from that licentiousness which in your situation is not uncommon ; nothing will contribute more to its suppression than a vigorous exertion of the powers vested in your Convention and Committee of S

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 March 1776

    I had the honor of receiving, yesterday, yours of the 19th, containing the agreeable information of the Ministerial troops having abandoned Boston.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 March 1776

    I GIVE you joy of Boston and Charlestown, once more the habitation of Americans.

  • George Mason letter to George Washington.

    Gunston Hall, VA - 2 April 1776

    We have just received the welcome news of your having, with so much address and success, dislodged the Ministerial troops, and taken possession of the town of Boston.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 5 April 1776

    I most sincerely congratulate you, I congratulate the public, on the great and glorious event, your possession of Boston. It will be a most bright page in the annals of America

  • letter to John Adams.

    Braintree, MA - 7 April 1776

    Abigail Adams letter to John Adams... The removal of the army seems to have stopped the current of news. I want to know to what part of America they are now wandering.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 April 1776

    You will see by the papers the news, the speculations, and the political plans of the day. The ports are opened wide enough at last, and privateers are allowed to prey upon British trade.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Fort George, NY - 12 April 1776

    All is in readiness to move, as soon as the Lakes open, which, I hope, will be in a day or two.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 April 1776

    As to your extraordinary code of laws, I cannot but laugh... Depend upon it, we know better than to repeal our masculine systems. Although they are in full force, you know they are little more than theory.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 April 1776

    I SEND you every newspaper that comes out, and I send you, now and then, a few sheets of paper, but this article is as scarce here, as with you. I would send a quire, if I could get a conveyance.

  • Charles Cornwallis letter to George Germain.

    On Board The Bristol - 18 April 1776

    I have nothing to inform your lordship of but that our passage has been very tedious, and that we are still about 370 leagues from our rendezvous at Cape Fear.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 20 April 1776

    Inclosed is a list of our force before Quebec, which, I am I sorry to say, is so very inconsiderable, and illy supplied with every requisite to carry on a siege, that I am very dubious of their success.

  • William Paterson letter to Aaron Burr.

    New Brunswick, NJ - 22 April 1776

    I was in expectation of hearing frequently from you, and, to tell the truth, was not a little mortified that I was passed over in silence. Why, Burr, all this negligence?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 April 1776

    This curious character of a barber, I have a great inclination to draw, for your amusement. He is a little dapper fellow, short and small, but active and lively. A tongue as fluent and voluble as you please

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 April 1776

    The Congress being determined on the reduction of Quebec, and the security of that country, for reasons too obvious to be mentioned, have left nothing undone which can any ways contribute to that end.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 25 April 1776

    The grief I feel on the evacuation of Canada by our troops, is greatly alleviated by the little loss sustained in the retreat, and the hope I have, that we shall maintain a superiority on the Lakes.

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Mcdougall.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 April 1776

    Many of the reasons you allege for delaying taxation are weighty, and I confess did not occur to me. It is certainly unreasonable to impose on the city, in its present circumstances, so great a share of the public expenses.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 28 April 1776

    Instead of domestic felicity, I am destined to public contentions. Instead of rural felicity, I must reconcile myself to the smoke and noise of a city. In the place of private peace, I must be distracted with the vexation of developing the deep intri

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 30 April 1776

    I have the pleasure to acquaint you of the safe arrival of the gentlemen from Congress, in good health and spirits.

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 6 May 1776

    I also inclose a copy of an act, discharging the inhabitants of this Colony from allegiance to the King of Great Britain, which was carried in the House of Deputies, after a debate, with but six dissentient voices

  • letter to John Adams.

    Braintree, MA - 7 May 1776

    I cannot say that I think you are very generous to the ladies; for, whilst you are proclaiming peace and good-will to men, emancipating all nations, you insist upon retaining an absolute power over wives.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 8 May 1776

    I heartily congratulate you on the success of your arms against Boston, and am sorry it is not in my power to give you a more pleasing account of our affairs in this country, which wear no very favorable aspect at present.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 10 May 1776

    We have just received an express from North Carolina, informing us of the arrival of eight large transports in Cape Fear River, in the whole containing, as it is supposed, about two thousand men.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 May 1776

    What shall I do with my office ? I want to resign it for a thousand reasons. Would you advise me ?

  • Benedict Arnold letter to .

    Sorel, QC, CAN - 15 May 1776

    I have purchased twenty-seven hundred bushels of wheat of Captain Cuthbert, at four shillings and sixpence, lawful money, payable in our paper bills of exchange, or an order on Congress

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 May 1776

    [I] cannot help expressing the very great pleasure it would afford both Mrs. Hancock and my self to have the happiness of accommodating you during your stay in this city.

  • Charles Cornwallis letter to George Germain.

    Camp At Cape Fear, SC - 16 May 1776

    I arrived here on the 3rd of this month, and had the pleasure of finding that many of the transports had got here before us.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 May 1776

    I HAVE this morning heard Mr. Duffield, upon the signs of the times. He ran a parallel between the case of Israel, and that of America ; and between the conduct of Pharaoh, and that of George.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to .

    Sorel, QC, CAN - 17 May 1776

    I am. very happy to find you are in sentiments with me in respect to the smallpox.

  • letter to Richard Lee.

    Williamsburg, VA - 20 May 1776

    Patrick Henry letter to Richard Henry Lee... The grand work of forming a constitution for Virginia is now before the convention...

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Long Island, NY - 21 May 1776

    As I have no desire of quitting the service, I hope the Congress will take no measure that will lay me under the disagreeable necessity of doing it.

  • Robert Livingston letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 May 1776

    If your Congress have any spirit, they will at least build fourteen or fifteen light boats capable of carrying a twelve-pounder, to secure Hudson River, which is to be the chief scene of action.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 May 1776

    Generals Gates and Mifflin are now here: General Washington will be here to-morrow, when we shall consult and deliberate concerning the operations of the ensuing campaign.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to .

    Lachine, QC, CAN - 25 May 1776

    One of our men this moment came in, who was taken at the Cedars. He made his escape this morning, and says we have lost only ten privates killed; the rest are prisoners at St. Ann's and the Cedars.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 May 1776

    I think you shine as a stateswoman of late, as well as a farmeress. Pray where do you get your maxims of state ? They are very apropos.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to .

    St Ann, QC, CAN - 27 May 1776

    I had sent early in the morning to the savages, demanding a surrender of our prisoners, and, in case of refusal, and that any of them were murdered, I would sacrifice every Indian who fell into my hands

  • John Jay letter to Robert Livingston.

    New York, NY - 29 May 1776

    Our Convention will, I believe, institute a better government than the present, which in my opinion will no longer work anything but mischief

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 June 1776

    YESTERDAY I dined with Captain Richards, the gentle man who made me the present of the brass pistols. We had cherries, strawberries and green peas in plenty.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Chamblee, QC, CAN - 3 June 1776

    General Thompson writes, that about eight hundred of the enemy had arrived at Three Rivers, forty-five miles below Sorel, where he is. This he has by report only.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to John Sullivan.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 5 June 1776

    I think it absolutely necessary some effectual methods should be taken with the savages immediately, or we shall be obliged to keep up a large force here.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Sorel, QC, CAN - 5 June 1776

    I arrived here at a very critical moment with my brigade. General Thompson was left but with very few men to defend this important post, the troops being scattered about in a most shocking manner.

  • Charles Pinckney Jr letter to Eliza Lucas.

    Fort Johnston, SC - 5 June 1776

    Lest my honored mother should be alarmed by hearing exaggerated reports of the fleet off the bar, I snatch a few minutes from the duties of my station to acquaint her of the particulars of it.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 6 June 1776

    Our want of almost every necessary for the army, and repeated misfortunes and losses, have greatly dispirited the troops. Our enemies are daily increasing, and our friends deserting us.

  • John Sullivan letter to William Thompson.

    Sorel, QC, CAN - 6 June 1776

    You are to march as soon as possible with Colonel Irvine's and Colonel Wayne's regiments, together with those of Colonel St. Clair now remaining at this place, and join Colonel St. Clair at Kicolet

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Sorel, QC, CAN - 8 June 1776

    I received a letter from General Thompson, of which the inclosed is a copy. I find that he has proceeded in the manner proposed, and made his attack on the troops at Three Rivers, at daylight

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 10 June 1776

    There was a meeting of those Indians and several other tribes at Caghnawaga, some of whom agreed to deliver up the hatchet received from Governor Carleton last year, and remain neuter in the present dispute.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to John Sullivan.

    Chamblee, QC, CAN - 10 June 1776

    Shall we sacrifice the few men we have, by endeavouring to keep possession of a small part of the country, which can be of little or no service to us ?

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 June 1776

    The Congress have agreed to settle the mode of paying the troops in the Eastern Department this morning, and to proceed to the appointment of a Deputy Paymaster-General.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 12 June 1776

    I have, within this half hour, received a letter from General Arnold, of which the inclosed is a copy. I fear the next will announce the evacuation of Canada by our troops, probably with loss

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    St Ann, QC, CAN - 13 June 1776

    We have a report here, that on Sunday last our army, of about two thousand men, under the command of General Thompson, attacked the enemy near Three Rivers, and were repulsed

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Lachine, QC, CAN - 13 June 1776

    Burgoyne is with the enemy. Seventy transports, and, by the best accounts, ten thousand troops, are arrived in Quebec.

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 June 1776

    I am informed that a certain Mr. Eustace, now in New York, but some time ago with Lord Dunmore, is acquainted with a practice that prevailed, of taking letters out of the post-office in Virginia, and carrying them to Dunmore for his perusal

  • Charles Pinckney Jr letter to Eliza Lucas.

    Fort Johnston, SC - 15 June 1776

    No attack has been made upon us yet, and from the strange conduct of the gentry in Five-Fathom Hole, I don t know when to expect one.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 June 1776

    I wish our uncle had as much ambition, as he has virtue and ability. A deficiency of ambition is as criminal and injurious as an excess of it. Tell him I say so.

  • letter to John Adams.

    Plymouth, MA - 17 June 1776

    Abigail Adams letter to John Adams... The approbation you give to my conduct in the management of our private affairs, is very grateful to me...

  • Charles Pinckney Jr letter to Eliza Lucas.

    Fort Johnston, SC - 17 June 1776

    The enemy has not thought fit to make any attack upon us yet. They employed themselves yesterday in landing some men on LongIsland (a small creek parts it from Sullivan's Island)

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 June 1776

    they have bent their whole attention to our affairs in Canada, and have adopted such measures, as, in their opinion, are calculated to place them on a better and more reputable footing for the future.

  • John Sullivan letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Isle-aux-noix, QC, CAN - 19 June 1776

    By a strange reverse of fortune we are driven to the sad necessity of abandoning Canada. I had the most sanguine hopes of collecting our army together, and driving the enemy below Dechambeau

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 June 1776

    The Congress, having the greatest reason to believe there has been very gross misconduct in the management of our affairs in Canada, have come to a resolution to have a general inquiry made into the behaviour of the officers employed on that expediti

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Isle-aux-noix, QC, CAN - 24 June 1776

    I find myself under an absolute necessity of quitting this Island for a place more healthy- other wise the army will never be able to return, as one fortnight longer in this place will not leave us well men enough to carry off the sick

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 25 June 1776

    By this express you will receive advice from General Schuyler of our evacuating Canada, an event which I make no doubt (from our distressed situation) you have some time expected.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 June 1776

    I am, however, to request you will give orders to have a stop put to raising the Mohegan and Stockbridge Indians, as soon as possible.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Isle-aux-noix, QC, CAN - 25 June 1776

    This was not owing to my being deceived with respect to the enemy on the ground at the time I wrote, but to the sudden arrival of such a number under General Burgoyne, the night before the battle of Three Rivers

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 June 1776

    Our misfortunes in Canada are enough to melt a heart of stone. The small pox is ten times more terrible than Britons, Canadians and Indians, together. This was the cause of our precipitate retreat from Quebec.

  • Charles Pinckney Jr letter to Eliza Lucas.

    Fort Johnston, SC - 29 June 1776

    I am sure my honored Mother must be anxious to know the event of yesterday's cannonade. I therefore take the earliest opportunity of acquainting her with the particulars of it.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 1 July 1776

    Yesterday morning General Gates introduced a Mr. Avery to me, who applied to me for money to carry on the Commissary-General's department here. I asked if Mr. Livingston was superseded, and begged to see how he (Avery) was authorized to act here.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 1 July 1776

    They immediately commenced the most furious fire I ever heard or saw. I confess I was in pain, from the little confidence I reposed in our troops ; the officers being all boys, and the men raw recruits.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 July 1776

    HAD a Declaration of Independency been made seven months ago, it would have been attended with many great and glorious effects. We might, before this hour, have formed alliances with foreign states.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 4 July 1776

    The retreat of the Northern army, and its present situation, have spread a general alarm. By intelligence from Major-General Schuyler, received last-evening, I have reason to conclude that they are now at Crown Point and Ticonderoga, in a weak state

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 July 1776

    the Congress have judged it necessary to dissolve the connection between Great Britain and the American Colonies, and to declare them free and independent States, as you will perceive by the in closed DECLARATION

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 July 1776

    The design of our enemy now seems to be, a powerful invasion of New York and New Jersey. The Halifax fleet and army is arrived, and another fleet and army under Lord Howe is expected to join them.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 July 1776

    Letters, like conversation, should be free, easy, and familiar. Simplicity and familiarity are the characteristics of this kind of writing. Affectation is as disagreeable in a letter, as in conversation

  • William Drayton letter to John Laurens.

    , SC - 7 July 1776

    As a magistrate I yesterday presented myself at your door to have the honor of paying my respects to your Excellency

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 July 1776

    You will sec, by the newspapers, which I, from time to time, enclose, with what rapidity the colonies proceed in their political manoeuvres. How many calamities might have been avoided, if these measures had been taken twelve months ago

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 July 1776

    The militia of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and the lower counties are marching with much alacrity, and a laudable zeal to take care of Howe and his army at Staten Island.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 July 1776

    Should the United States of America give their sanction to the Jesuitical and villanous distinction which Captain Forster adopts to justify his conduct, there would be no end to butchering our prisoners.

  • letter to Richard Lee.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 July 1776

    Sam Adams letter to Richard Henry Lee... General Howe, as you have heard, is arrived at New York. He has brought with him from eight to ten thousand troops.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 July 1776

    There is a most amiable, laudable and gallant spirit prevailing in these middle colonies. The militia turn out in great numbers, and in high spirits, in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware, so that we hope to resist Howe and his myrmidons

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Fort Montgomery, NY - 15 July 1776

    At the same time I issued orders to all the regiments in my brigade, to stand ready to march on a moment's warning, and despatched expresses to all owners of sloops and boats twenty miles up the west side of the river

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 July 1776

    We had yesterday an express from General Lee in Charleston, South Carolina, with an account of a brilliant little action between the armament under Clinton and Cornwallis, and a battery on Sullivan's Island

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 July 1776

    If you were too busy to write, I hoped that some kind hand would have been found to let me know something about you. Do my friends think that I have been a politician so long, as to have lost all feeling?

  • William Drayton letter to Francis Salvador.

    Charleston, SC - 24 July 1776

    I am much obliged by your favor of the 19th, which gave me not only a comprehensive view of affairs your way, from the beginning of the war; but, also, the ideas of people touching the discharge of Cunningham and his companions.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Long Island, NY - 25 July 1776

    The science or art of war requires a freedom of thought, and leisure to reflect upon the various incidents that daily occur, which cannot be had where the whole of one's time is engrossed in clerical employments.

  • Israel Putnam letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 26 July 1776

    I have, agreeably to your desire, waited on his excellency to endeavour to obtain permission for you to go to Staten Island.

  • Aaron Burr letter to William Paterson.

    New York, NY - 26 July 1776

    Can it be that you have still in memory the vagrant Burr?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 July 1776

    How are you all this morning ? Sick, weak, faint, in pain, or pretty well recovered ? By this time, you are well acquainted with the small pox. Pray, how do you like it ?

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 30 July 1776

    I left them such directions as I thought necessary, and orders to begin four row-galleys, nearly of the construction of those built in Philadelphia, to carry four pieces heavy and two pieces light cannon each.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 August 1776

    Should Congress ever empower its Generals to fill up the vacancies in the army, they know of no one in whom they would so soon repose a trust of such importance as in yourself

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 August 1776

    Went this morning to the Baptist meeting, in hopes of hearing Mr. Stillman, but was disappointed. He was there, but another gentleman preached.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 5 August 1776

    The troops from this State, destined to the northward, are marched to Bennington, and from thence to Skenesborough.

  • Thomas Mifflin letter to George Washington.

    Mount Washington, NH - 6 August 1776

    Agreeably to your order, by Colonel Reed's letter, I have directed Colonel Holden to march with his three companies this evening to King's Bridge.

  • Horatio Gates letter to Benedict Arnold.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 7 August 1776

    You will station the fleet in the best manner to maintain the possession of those passes, according as your judgment shall determine, cautiously avoiding to place the vessels in a manner, which might unnecessarily expose them

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Skenesborough, NY - 8 August 1776

    The carpenters go on with great spirit. Eight gondolas will be completed in a few days. One row-galley is gone to Ticonderoga, and will soon be fitted and armed.

  • Aaron Burr letter to T Edwards.

    New York, NY - 10 August 1776

    Our six galleys which went up the North river attacked the British ships.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 August 1776

    A French vessel, a pretty large brigantine, deeply laden, arrived here yesterday, from Martinique. She had fifty barrels of limes, which are all sold, already, at such prices, that the amount of them will be sufficient to load the brig with flour.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 August 1776

    I want to be informed of the state of things with you ; whether there is a scarcity of provisions of any kind, of West India articles, of clothing ? Whether any trade is carried on, any fishery ?

  • William Livingston letter to George Washington.

    Elizabethtown, NJ - 12 August 1776

    The two thousand men for the Flying Camp, under General Dickinson, are in great forwardness, and (although very little acquainted with their duty) might answer a valuable purpose in New York

  • letter to .

    , VA - 13 August 1776

    Patrick Henry letter to Ministers and Delegates of the Baptist Churches... I am happy to find a catholic spirit prevailing in our country, and that those religious distinctions, which formerly produced some heats, are now forgotten.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 August 1776

    THIS is the anniversary of a memorable day in the history of America. A day when the principle of American resistance and independence was first asserted and carried into action. The stamp office fell before the rising spirit of our countrymen.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Kings Bridge, NY - 17 August 1776

    The fire-ships were well conducted ; the armed schooner was grappled and burnt ; the Phoenix was grappled for about ten minutes, but got herself clear. The Lady Washington galley and Independence, were conducted with great judgment and bravery.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 August 1776

    I have seen in this world but a little of that pure flame of patriotism which certainly burns in some breasts. There is much of the ostentation and affectation of it. I have known a few, who could not bear to entertain a selfish design

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Kings Bridge, NY - 18 August 1776

    Early this morning, the Phoenix man-of-war, Rose frigate, and the two tenders, came to sail, and stood down the river, keeping close under the east shore, in order to avoid the fire of our cannon.

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 18 August 1776

    M. Penet had somehow got intelligence of my being in France, and that I was expected at Paris ; he, therefore, waited for me, and I saw him the next day at my hotel

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 August 1776

    YESTERDAY morning, I took a walk into Arch street to see Mr. Peale's Painter's room. Peale is from Maryland, a tender, soft, affectionate creature.

  • Silas Deane letter to Charles Gravier.

    Paris, FR - 22 August 1776

    I was this morning informed of the arrival of Mr Arthur Lee, and that he would be in Paris tomorrow. This was surprising to me, as I knew of no particular affair that might call him here

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 August 1776

    Another winter, will do much for us too. We shall have more and better soldiers. We shall be better armed. We shall have a greater force at sea. We shall have more trade. Our artillery will be greatly increased, our officers will have more experience

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 28 August 1776

    As the smallpox is now perfectly removed from the army, I shall, in consequence of the intelligence received of the motions of the enemy, immediately assemble my principal strength to maintain this important pass

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Horatio Gates.

    Button Mould Bay, VT - 31 August 1776

    Inclosed is a return of the strength of the fleet, by which you will observe that seventy-four men are wanting to complete the numbers proposed for the vessels, which are barely sufficient when complete.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Horatio Gates.

    Willsborough, NY - 2 September 1776

    I have some thoughts of going to Congress, and begging leave to resign. Do you think they will make me a Major-General?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 September 1776

    But it is uncertain when I shall set off for home. I will not go at present Affairs are too delicate and critical. The panic may seize I whom it will. It shall not seize me. I will stay here until the public countenance is better, or much worse.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 September 1776

    THIS day, I think, has been the most remarkable of all. Sullivan came here from Lord Howe, five days ago,with a message, that his lordship desired a half an hour's conversation with some of the members of Congress in their private capacities.

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 6 September 1776

    The necessity, which caused the unexpected evacuation of Long Island, hath alarmed the General Assembly of this State, as it seems that communications cannot be kept open with an island where the enemy's ships can approach.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Horatio Gates.

    Windmill Point, VT - 7 September 1776

    I have posted my guard-boats at a point running into the Lake, about one mile below us. The enemy's boats have several times appeared on the Lake, with a view of decoying our boats

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 9 September 1776

    I am informed that the army is in the greatest distress for medicines. As every misfortune and want they labor under is imputed to me, so is this.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 September 1776

    YESTERDAY morning, I returned with Dr. Franklin and Mr. Rutledge from Staten Island, where we met Lord Howe, and had about three hours conversation with him.

  • Silas Deane letter to Robert Morris.

    Bordeaux, FR - 17 September 1776

    I shall send you in October clothing for 20,000 men, 30,000 fusils, 100 tons of powder, 200 brass cannon, 24 brass mortars, with shells, shot, lead, he. in proportion.

  • John Rutledge letter to .

    , SC - 19 September 1776

    I think it my duty to pay this tribute of applause to those brave troops who, in repelling the formidable British armament which at tacked them on Sullivan's Island, vainly flattering themselves with an assurance of easy conquest, displayed firmness

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 September 1776

    WE have at last agreed upon a plan for forming a regular army. We have offered twenty dollars and a hundred acres of land to every man who will enlist during the war.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Edwards.

    Kingsbridge, NY - 26 September 1776

    It has been always held a maxim that our island and seaport towns were at the discretion of the tyrant of Great Britain.

  • letter to John Adams.

    Braintree, MA - 29 September 1776

    Abigail Adams letter to John Adams... We seem to be kept in total ignorance of affairs at York. I hope you at Congress are more enlightened.

  • John Rutledge letter to .

    , SC - 30 September 1776

    I was informed, by a letter from the Committee of Secrecy, War and Intelligence, in North Carolina, of their having received advice that the enemy, who then lay in Cape Fear River, had planned a descent at the mouth of Little River

  • Silas Deane letter to Robert Morris.

    Paris, FR - 30 September 1776

    To solicit arms, clothing, and tents for thirty thousand men, two hundred brass cannon, mortars, and other stores in proportion, and to be destitute of one shilling of ready-money

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 October 1776

    I will not say, that I expect to run distracted, to grow melancholy, to drop in an apoplexy or fall into a consumption ; but I do say, it is little less than a miracle, that one or other of these misfortunes has not befallen me before now.

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 1 October 1776

    For me, alas ! I had nothing left but to make the most positive assertions, that no accommodation would or could take place, and to pledge myself in the strongest possible manner, that thus would turn out the event

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 October 1776

    I AM seated in a large library room with eight gentlemen round about me, all engaged in conversation. Amidst these interruptions, how shall I make it out to write a letter ?

  • Robert Howe letter to John Rutledge.

    Charleston, SC - 6 October 1776

    The command of the Military Department in this State devolving upon me, I feel it my duty to lay before your Excellency, and by your means before the Honorable Council and Assembly, my sentiments

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 7 October 1776

    I find the enemy are encamped right opposite, to the number of between three and four thousand ; and the Major adds, from their disposition and search after boats, they design to cross the river.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 October 1776

    I assure you, we are as much at a loss, about affairs at New York, as you are. In general, our Generals were outgeneraled on Long Island, and Sullivan and Stirling with a thousand men were made prisoners

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 8 October 1776

    Your Declaration of the fourth of July last has given this Court, as well as several others in Europe, reason to expect you would in form announce your Independency to them, and ask their friendship

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 9 October 1776

    The stores at Dobbs's Ferry I had just given orders to the Quartermaster to prepare wagons to remove. I think the enemy will meet with some difficulty in crossing the river at Dobbs's Ferry. However, it is not best to trust too much to the expected d

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 October 1776

    But I am coming to make my apology in person. I yesterday, asked and obtained leave of absence.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    New Haven, CT - 11 October 1776

    Our naval expedition against the ships of the enemy in the Sound is still in contemplation, and preparations are making for the same as fast as we can.

  • John Jay letter to Edward Rutledge.

    Fishkill, NY - 11 October 1776

    Let no considerations induce you to excuse General Mifflin from the office of quarter-master-general. Moyland acted wisely and honestly in resigning.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Horatio Gates.

    Schuylers Island, NY - 12 October 1776

    At half past twelve the engagement became general, and very warm. Some of the enemy's ships, and all their gondolas, beat and rowed up within musket shot of us.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 15 October 1776

    They kept up an incessant fire upon us for about five glasses, with round and grape shot, which we returned as briskly. The sails, rigging, and hull of the Congress were shattered and torn in pieces

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 17 October 1776

    I once more put pen to paper, not to attempt, what is absolutely beyond the power of language to paint, my distressed situation here, totally destitute of intelligence or instructions from you since I left America

  • Silas Deane letter to John Hancock.

    Paris, FR - 17 October 1776

    The bearer, Mons. M. Martin de la Balme, has long served with reputation in the armies of France as a Captain of Cavalry, and is now advanced to the rank of a Lt Colonel

  • Silas Deane letter to William Bingham.

    Paris, FR - 17 October 1776

    My request is, that you would inquire into the state of that island, by proper emissaries, and if the Caribs are disposed to revolt, encourage them and promise them aid of arms and ammunition.

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 20 October 1776

    I have purchased two hundred tons of powder, and ordered the sarae to be shipped to Martinique to the care of Mons. Deant, to the direction of Mr Bingham for your use.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 24 October 1776

    I am extremely glad to hear the militia are coming to our assistance. I believe the enemy, from the best accounts we can collect, are endeavouring to fortify Crown Point.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 24 October 1776

    Inclosed you have a copy of the letter, in answer to mine to Congress, relative to cartridges. As soon as the cartridges come up, they shall be forwarded.

  • Silas Deane letter to William Bingham.

    Paris, FR - 25 October 1776

    I have received no letter from you since those of the 4th and 5th of August last, nor any intelligence from Congress since the 5th June, which not only surprises but distresses me.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 31 October 1776

    The enemy have possession of Fort Independence, on the heights above King's Bridge. They made their appearance the night before last. We had got every thing of value away.

  • Horatio Gates letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 31 October 1776

    Monday morning, between eight and nine o clock, our advanced guard-boat, down the Lake, made the signal for the approach of the enemy's fleet. In about one hour, five of their largest boats or gondolas appeared in sight

  • Horatio Gates letter to .

    Ticonderoga, NY - 5 November 1776

    I have the honor to congratulate Congress upon the retreat of Lieutenant-General Sir Guy Carleton, with the fleet and army under his command, from Crown Point, Saturday last.

  • John Rutledge letter to William Drayton.

    Charleston, SC - 6 November 1776

    Enclosed you will receive an extract from the Journals of the Privy Council

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 6 November 1776

    If the Congress do not mean to apply for foreign alliances, let me entreat you to say so, and rescind your resolutions published on that head, which will he but justice to the powers of Europe

  • Robert Howe letter to .

    Charleston, SC - 7 November 1776

    I have the honor to transmit you, by the Hon. Mr. Drayton, the copy of a resolution of the Council of this State, for obtaining the aid of 1,500 minute men, or militia men, from North Carolina

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 9 November 1776

    The want of intelligence retards every thing ; as I have not a word from you since the 5th of June last, I am well nigh distracted.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philipsburg, PA - 12 November 1776

    I am far from being satisfied with the conduct of our scouts. I do not think they venture far enough, for they generally bring back very lame, imperfect accounts.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Hector Cramahe.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 15 November 1776

    This I imputed to the ignorance of your guards, and ordered him to return this morning, and, to my great surprise, he was received in the same manner as yesterday.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philipsburg, PA - 19 November 1776

    The recommendation of General Greene, which you transmitted to me ; threw the officers to whom. I communicated it into so great a flame of discontent, that I ventured, notwithstanding your orders, to hesitate.

  • Edward Rutledge letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 November 1776

    I expected long ere this to have been seated quietly at home ; but the progress which the enemy had made, and seemed likely to make, into your country, induced me to suspend my resolution

  • letter to Anthony Wayne.

    Albany, NY - 26 November 1776

    The Enemy have taken Fort Washington, (after an obstinate Defence), & made the Garrison, consisting of Near Two Thousand Men Prisoners

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philipsburg, PA - 26 November 1776

    It never was my idea to leave the Highlands unguarded, but only for expedition's sake that Heath should detach two thousand of his corps immediately over the river, and to replace these two thousand by the same number

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 26 November 1776

    This serves only to enclose and explain the within State of the Commerce of Leghorn, which was given me by the Envoy of the Grand Duke of Tuscany

  • Silas Deane letter to John Hancock.

    Paris, FR - 27 November 1776

    The bearer, Mr Rogers, is a native of Maryland, whom I fortunately met in the hotel I some months lodged in.

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 27 November 1776

    Admiral Montague lately returned from the Banks, where the fishermen have had a wretched season, in consequence of the American privateers.

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 28 November 1776

    This letter was very far from relieving me, as it enclosed what had been circulated through Europe for two months before, and my pretending to inform this Court would be only a matter of form

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 29 November 1776

    I should never have completed what I have, but for the generous, the indefatigable and spirited exertions of Monsieur Beaumarchais, to whom the United States are on every account greatly indebted

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 29 November 1776

    I have recommended several officers to your service, but none with greater pleasure, scarce any one with so much confidence of his answering great and valuable purposes, as the bearer, Colonel Conway

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 1 December 1776

    Among the many important objects, which employ your whole attention, I presume ways and means for defraying the expenses of the present war have a capital place.

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 3 December 1776

    Immediately on my arrival, I sent forward your bills, a large part of which were protested, and intelligence arriving of the loss of Canada, and that Carleton was even on the frontiers of the Colonies

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FR - 3 December 1776

    If my letters arrive safe they will give you some idea of my situation. Without intelligence, without orders, and without remittances, yet boldly plunging into contracts, engagements, and negotiations, hourly hoping that something will arrive from Am

  • letter to Edmund Pendleton.

    Williamsburg, VA - 6 December 1776

    Patrick Henry letter to Edmund Pendleton... a Doubt arises whether the Governor alone may issue a warrant upon the Treasury...

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 6 December 1776

    You have enclosed the duplicate of an agreement with Mons. du Coudray, of my orders for clothing, stores, &c.

  • Silas Deane letter to Charles Gravier.

    Paris, FR - 8 December 1776

    I received last evening a letter from my friend, Dr Franklin, at Nantes, which place he was to leave last sunday morning, so that I expect him in Paris this day

  • Silas Deane letter to .

    Paris, FR - 12 December 1776

    Just as I had closed my despatches by the Generals de Coudray and Baron de Kalb, I was most agreeably surprised with a letter from Dr Franklin, at Nantes, where he arrived

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Sarah Gouverneur.

    Fishkill, NY - 19 December 1776

    We all sustain in her a great loss, but you in particular, who are thus bereft of the companion of your age, must feel it most severely.

  • William Howe letter to George Germain.

    New York, NY - 20 December 1776

    In Jersey, upon the approach of the van of Lord Cornwallis' corps to Brunswick by a forced march on the 1st inst, the enemy went off most precipitately to Princetown

  • letter to Cornelius Harnett.

    Williamsburg, VA - 23 December 1776

    Patrick Henry letter to Cornelius Harnett... By the inclosed you will perceive the Ideas of this Commonwealth on the subject of military things.

  • Robert Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 December 1776

    I am well pleased to see the attention they pay General Lee ; and I shall make it a point to collect and send your Excellency, soon as possible, the one hundred half Johannes they order.

  • John Cadwalader letter to George Washington.

    Bristol, PA - 26 December 1776

    The river was so full of ice that it was impossible to pass above Bristol, where I intended, and there fore concluded to make an attempt at Dunks's Ferry.

  • John Cadwalader letter to George Washington.

    Burlington, PA - 27 December 1776

    As I did not hear from you this morning, and being prepared to embark, I concluded you were still on this side, and therefore embarked, and landed about fifteen hundred men about two miles above Bristol.

  • Thomas Mifflin letter to George Washington.

    Bristol, PA - 28 December 1776

    I came here at four o clock this afternoon. Five hundred men, sent from Philadelphia yesterday, crossed to Burlington this morning. This evening I sent over near three hundred more.

  • Robert Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 December 1776

    I have just received your favor of this day, and sent to General Putnam to detain the express until I collect the hard money you want, which you may depend shall be sent, in one specie or other, with this letter