1774 Letters

42 Letters written in 1774 from 6 author(s) to 16 people including Abigail Adams , and John Adams from places such as New York, NY, , VA and Mount Vernon, VA.

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  • sponsored contentGouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Penn.

    New York, NY - 20 May 1774

    You have heard, and you will hear, a great deal about politics, and in the heap of chaff you may find some grains of good sense. Believe me, Sir, freedom and religion are only watch words.

  • sponsored content letter to Richard Lee.

    Boston, MA - 0 July 1774

    Sam Adams letter to Richard Henry Lee... The unrighteous and oppressive act of the British Parliament for shutting up this harbour ... has hitherto failed

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Penn.

    New York, NY - 7 January 1774

    Politics I dislike, and only look on with pity, while the madness of so many is made the gain of so few

  • letter to William Bradford.

    , VA - 24 January 1774

    I congratulate you on your heroic proceedings in Philadelphia with regard to the tea. I wish Boston may conduct matters with as much discretion as they seem to do with boldness.

  • George Washington letter to James Tilghman.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 0 February 1774

    Interested as well as political motives render it necessary for me to seat the lands, which I have patented on the Ohio, in the cheapest, most expeditious, and effectual manner.

  • George Washington letter to Henry Riddell.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 22 February 1774

    Mr. Young, hearing me express a desire of importing Palatines to settle on my lands on the Ohio, tells me, that, in discoursing of this matter in your company, you suggested an expedient, which might probably be attended with success

  • Timothy Pickering letter to James Latham.

    Salem, MA - 21 March 1774

    When you have informed me of your design in making this request, I shall be able to give you a further answer.

  • letter to William Bradford.

    , VA - 1 April 1774

    That liberal, catholic, and equitable way of thinking, as to the rights of conscience, which is one of the characteristics of a free people, and so strongly marks the people of your province, is but little known among the zealous adherents to our hie

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Boston, MA - 12 May 1774

    I AM extremely afflicted with the relation your father gave me of the return of your disorder. I fear you have taken some cold.

  • letter to George Fairfax.

    Williamsburg, VA - 10 June 1774

    George Washington letter to George William Fairfax...in short the Ministry may rely on it that Americans will never be tax'd without their own consent...

  • George Washington letter to Edward Snickers.

    Williamsburg, VA - 16 June 1774

    Enclosed you will receive Mr. Hughes's warrant in his own right, for two thousand acres of land, the getting of which, at this time, he must look upon as a very great favor, as the Governor has dispensed with two positive instructions to oblige him.

  • letter to Samuel Adams.

    Chantilly, VA - 23 June 1774

    Richard Henry Lee letter to Sam Adams... The day before we were dissolved, I had prepared a set of resolutions, the two last of which, were thus expressed...

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    New York, NY - 29 June 1774

    I HAVE a great deal of leisure, which I chiefly employ in scribbling, that my mind may not stand still or run back, like my fortune.

  • letter to William Bradford.

    , VA - 1 July 1774

    As to the sentiments of the people of this Colony with respect to the Bostonians, I can assure you I find them very warm in their favor.

  • letter to Bryan Fairfax.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 4 July 1774

    George Washington letter to Bryan Fairfax...Does it not appear, as clear as the sun in its meridian brightness, that there is a regular, systematic plan formed to fix the right and practice of taxation upon us?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Falmouth, MA - 6 July 1774

    MOBS are the trite topic of declamation and invective among all the ministerial people far and near. They are grown universally learned in the nature, tendency and consequences of them, and very elegant and pathetic in descanting upon them.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Falmouth, MA - 7 July 1774

    I am engaged in a famous cause. The cause of King of Scarborough versus a mob that broke into his house and rifled his papers and terrified him, his wife, children and servants in the night.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Falmouth, MA - 9 July 1774

    I NEVER enjoyed better health in any of my journeys,but this has been the most tedious, the most irk some, the most gloomy and melancholy I ever made. I cannot, with all my philosophy and Christian resignation, keep up my spirits.

  • letter to Bryan Fairfax.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 20 July 1774

    George Washington letter to Bryan Fairfax... I see nothing on the one hand, to induce a belief that the Parliament would embrace a favourable oppertunity of Repealing Acts...

  • Aaron Burr letter to Matthias Ogden.

    Litchfield, CT - 14 August 1774

    Before I proceed any further, let me tell you that, a few days ago, a mob of several hundred persons gathered at Barrington

  • letter to John Adams.

    Braintree, MA - 19 August 1774

    Abigail Adams letter to John Adams... The great anxiety I feel for my country, for you, and for our family, renders the day tedious, and the night unpleasant.

  • letter to Bryan Fairfax.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 24 August 1774

    George Washington letter to Bryan Fairfax... For my own part, I shall not undertake to say where the Line between Great Britain and the Colonies should be drawn, but I am clearly of opinion that one ought to be drawn...

  • Timothy Pickering letter to Paine Wingate.

    Salem, MA - 25 August 1774

    It will he agreeable to you to have an authentic account of the recent transactions in this town.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Princeton, NJ - 28 August 1774

    The education of our children is never out of my mind. Train them to virtue. Habituate them to industry, activity and spirit. Make them consider every vice as shameful and unmanly.

  • letter to John Adams.

    Braintree, MA - 2 September 1774

    Abigail Adams letter to John Adams... great commotions have arisen in consequence of a discovery of a traitorous plot of Colonel Brattle's

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 September 1774

    We have received a confused account from Boston of a dreadful catastrophe. The particulars we have not heard. We are waiting with the utmost anxiety and impatience, for further intelligence.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Matthias Ogden.

    Litchfield, CT - 11 September 1774

    I wrote you last Thursday, and enclosed one of the songs you desired, which was all I could then obtain.

  • letter to John Adams.

    Braintree, MA - 14 September 1774

    Abigail Adams letter to John Adams... The Governor is making all kinds of warlike preparations, such as mounting cannon upon Beacon Hill, digging intrenchments upon the Neck...

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 September 1774

    A Tory here is the most despicable animal in the creation. Spiders, toads, snakes are their only proper emblems.

  • letter to John Adams.

    Braintree, MA - 16 September 1774

    Abigail Adams letter to John Adams... I dined to-day at Colonel Quincy's.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 September 1774

    we were so divided in religious sentiments ; some Episcopalians, some Quakers, some Anabaptists, some Presbyterians, and some Congregationalists, that we could not join in the same act of worship.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 September 1774

    The proceedings of the Congress are all a profound secret as yet, except two votes which were passed yesterday, and ordered to be printed. You will see them from every quarter.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 September 1774

    When the horrid news was brought here of the bombardment of Boston, which made us completely miserable for two days, we saw proofs both of the sympathy and the resolution of the continent. War! war! war! was the cry

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 September 1774

    I am anxious to know how you can live without government But the experiment must be tried. The evils will not be found so dreadful as you apprehend them.

  • letter to John Adams.

    Boston, MA - 22 September 1774

    Abigail Adams letter to John Adams... The maxim, "In time of peace prepare for war," (if this may be called a time of peace,) resounds throughout the country.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 September 1774

    Fifty gentlemen meeting together, all strangers, are not acquainted with each other's language, ideas, views, designs.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 September 1774

    Patience, forbearance, long suffering are the lessons taught here for our province, and at the same time, absolute and open resistance to the new Government.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 October 1774

    I wish I could write to you a dozen letters every day. But the business before me is so arduous, and takes up my time so entirely, that I cannot write often.

  • letter to Robert Mckenzie.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 October 1774

    George Washington letter to Robert McKenzie...

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 October 1774

    This assembly is like no other that ever existed. Every man in it is a great roan, an orator, a critic, a statesman ; and therefore, every man upon every question, must show his oratory, his criticism, and his political abilities.

  • letter to Fleming.

    Hanover, VA - 15 October 1774

    Sarah Henry letter to Mrs. William Fleming... My son Patrick has gone to Philadelphia near seven weeks.

  • letter to John Adams.

    Braintree, MA - 16 October 1774

    Abigail Adams letter to John Adams... The whole collected stock of ten weeks absence knows not how to brook any longer restraint, but will break forth and flow through my pen.