Philip John Schuyler Letters for the years 1775 thru 1789

Philip John Schuyler

Philip John Schuyler wrote 38 Letters from a total of 9 locations including Saratoga, NY, Ticonderoga, NY, and Albany, NY. Philip John Schuyler wrote a total of 3 people including George Washington, and John Jay. Most of Philip John Schuyler's letters were written in the year 1775. Several other letters were written in 1777 and 1776. Who did Philip John Schuyler know? View Philip John Schuyler's social graph.

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  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Saratoga, NY - 15 July 1775

    I wish I may be able to proceed to Ticonderoga, as I am very much wanted there, the greatest confusion having taken place in the controversy between the officers claiming the command in that quarter.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 18 July 1775

    You will expect that I should say something about this place and the troops here. Not one earthly thing for offence or defence has been done ; the commanding officer has no orders

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 31 July 1775

    Since my last I have been most assiduously employed in preparing materials for building boats to convey me across the Lake.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 6 August 1775

    Immediately on my arrival here, I issued such orders respecting the provisions and stores, (which I found had been most scandalously embezzled or misapplied,) as I hoped would effectually have brought matters into a right train

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 27 August 1775

    on my arrival at Saratoga, I received information, that a large body of Indians of the Six Nations were to be here on Tuesday last, and that my presence was indispensably necessary.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 31 August 1775

    General Montgomery leaves Crown Point to-day, with twelve hundred men and four twelve-pounders. I follow him this evening

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 20 September 1775

    We approached half a mile nearer and then landed without opposition, in a close, deep swamp, which extended to very near the fort. Here we formed, and marched in the best order we could towards the fort, to reconnoitre.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 26 September 1775

    If Job had been a General in my situation, his memory had not been so famous for patience. But the glorious end we have in view, and which I have confident hope will be attained, will atone for all.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 12 October 1775

    I am extremely apprehensive that a want of powder will be fatal to our operations. I have sent Express to Albany and New York, but have not yet learnt whether I shall be supplied or not.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 26 October 1775

    The reduction of Chamblee will, in all probability, be followed by that of St. John's, especially as General Montgomery has now a supply of powder

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 6 November 1775

    Should success crown our endeavours at St. John's, of which there seems to be little doubt, the entire reduction of Canada will, in all probability, be the consequence

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 28 November 1775

    The evening before General Montgomery landed on the Island of Montreal, Mr. Carleton embarked his garrison on board of some vessels and small craft, and made two attempts to pass our batteries

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 5 January 1776

    now or never is the time for every virtuous American to exert himself in the cause of liberty and his country ; and that it is become a duty cheer fully to sacrifice the sweets of domestic felicity, to attain the honest, and glorious end America has

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 13 January 1776

    My amiable friend, the gallant Montgomery, is no more ; the brave Arnold is wounded; and we have met with a severe check in an unsuccessful attempt on Quebec.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Fort George, NY - 12 April 1776

    All is in readiness to move, as soon as the Lakes open, which, I hope, will be in a day or two.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 25 April 1776

    The grief I feel on the evacuation of Canada by our troops, is greatly alleviated by the little loss sustained in the retreat, and the hope I have, that we shall maintain a superiority on the Lakes.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 12 June 1776

    I have, within this half hour, received a letter from General Arnold, of which the inclosed is a copy. I fear the next will announce the evacuation of Canada by our troops, probably with loss

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 1 July 1776

    Yesterday morning General Gates introduced a Mr. Avery to me, who applied to me for money to carry on the Commissary-General's department here. I asked if Mr. Livingston was superseded, and begged to see how he (Avery) was authorized to act here.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 9 September 1776

    I am informed that the army is in the greatest distress for medicines. As every misfortune and want they labor under is imputed to me, so is this.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Saratoga, NY - 14 June 1777

    Our numbers are so few to the northward, and we have so little prospect of their increasing, that should a disaster befall us at Ticonderoga, we should have very few troops indeed to oppose them.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Fort Edward, NY - 16 June 1777

    If the information which Amsbury gives is to be relied upon, as I think it is, we shall soon be air tacked at Ticonderoga

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 28 June 1777

    Should an accident happen to the garrison of Ticonderoga, and General Burgoyne make a push to gain the south part of the Lake, I know of no obstacle to prevent him.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Saratoga, NY - 7 July 1777

    just before they arrived at Skenesborough, they were overtaken by the enemy's vessels and gunboats, and were obliged to abandon the vessels, in which we lost all our ammunition.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Fort Edward, NY - 9 July 1777

    Since I wrote you from Saratoga, I have not been able to learn what is become of General St. Clair and the enemy. The army followed the troops that came to Skenesborough as far as Fort Ann, where they were yesterday repulsed

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Fort Edward, NY - 14 July 1777

    On the 12th instant General St. Clair arrived here. As he fell in with Hudson's River about twelve miles below this, I ordered the troops to halt at Fort Miller, having no kind of shelter for them at any other place

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Saratoga, NY - 28 July 1777

    So far from the militia that are with me increasing , they are daily diminishing, and I am very confident that in ten days, if the enemy should not Disturb us, we shall not have five hundred left

  • Philip Schuyler letter to Benjamin Lincoln.

    Saratoga, NY - 31 July 1777

    As General Burgoyne is advancing towards us, and as a movement of a body of troops from the Grants towards Skenesborough will doubtless much embarrass him

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Stillwater, NY - 4 August 1777

    By the unanimous advice of all the General Officers, I have moved the army to this place. We propose to fortify our camp, in hopes that re-enforcements will enable us to keep our ground

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Van Schaicks Island, NY - 19 August 1777

    I have the honor to congratulate your Excellency on a signal victory gained by General Stark over a detachment of about fifteen hundred of the enemy near Bennington

  • Philip Schuyler letter to John Jay.

    Saratoga, NY - 6 November 1777

    When I did myself the pleasure to write you on the 17th ult., I was not apprized of the enemy's progress up Hudson's River, nor of the barbarous devastation they have been guilty of committing at Kingston

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 March 1780

    I do not mean, Sir, to convey the most distant idea, that I solicit a restoration to the rank and place I held in the army

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 March 1780

    I believe it will be necessary for General Greene to address Congress very pointedly on the subject of the wagoners, as I find a disposition in many to have them drawn from the army.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 April 1780

    I have entreated General Greene to remain a day or two longer in town, that I may be able to advise with him on the measures necessary to be pursued to prevent the ill consequences of his being driven to the necessity of a resignation

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 21 January 1781

    and most sincerely sympathize with you on the embarrassments which the disagreeable event in Jersey will occasion you. It is an awful lesson to the States

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 3 April 1781

    The motives which led Congress to postpone filling the War department have leaked out, and been communicated to me.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 15 January 1782

    It is now a notorious fact, that three parties have been expressly sent from Canada to take or put me to death.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to John Jay.

    New York, NY - 18 February 1784

    I think I hear you wish to be advised of what is passing in your native country, at a juncture when the decisions of government must determine the philosophers and politicians of Europe to form their opinion of our wisdom or our folly.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 2 May 1789

    Until the adoption of the present system of National Government, it was a constant and a painful reflection to every patriot, that the inefficacy of the late Confederation threatened to deprive America of those blessings, for which she was greatly in