Nathanael Greene Letters for the years 1776 thru 1783

Nathanael Greene

Nathanael Greene wrote 82 Letters from a total of 34 locations including Long Island, NY, Fort Lee, NJ, and Camp At The Plains. Nathanael Greene wrote a total of 6 people including George Washington, and Francis Marion. Most of Nathanael Greene's letters were written in the year 1782. Several other letters were written in 1781 and 1780. Who did Nathanael Greene know? View Nathanael Greene's social graph.

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  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Long Island, NY - 21 May 1776

    As I have no desire of quitting the service, I hope the Congress will take no measure that will lay me under the disagreeable necessity of doing it.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Long Island, NY - 25 July 1776

    The science or art of war requires a freedom of thought, and leisure to reflect upon the various incidents that daily occur, which cannot be had where the whole of one's time is engrossed in clerical employments.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 7 October 1776

    I find the enemy are encamped right opposite, to the number of between three and four thousand ; and the Major adds, from their disposition and search after boats, they design to cross the river.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 9 October 1776

    The stores at Dobbs's Ferry I had just given orders to the Quartermaster to prepare wagons to remove. I think the enemy will meet with some difficulty in crossing the river at Dobbs's Ferry. However, it is not best to trust too much to the expected d

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 24 October 1776

    Inclosed you have a copy of the letter, in answer to mine to Congress, relative to cartridges. As soon as the cartridges come up, they shall be forwarded.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 31 October 1776

    The enemy have possession of Fort Independence, on the heights above King's Bridge. They made their appearance the night before last. We had got every thing of value away.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Camp At The Plains - 21 July 1778

    Your Excellency has made me very unhappy. I can submit very patiently to deserved censure ; but it wounds my feelings exceedingly to meet with a rebuke for doing what I conceived to be a proper part of my duty, and in the order of things.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 28 August 1778

    In my last I communicated to your Excellency the departure of the Count D Estaing with his fleet, for Boston. This disagreeable event has, as I apprehend, ruined all our operations.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 16 September 1778

    The growing extravagance of the people, and the increasing demand for the article of forage in this quarter, have become a very alarming affair. Hay is from sixty to eighty dollars a ton, and upon the rise.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 April 1779

    I am happy to find you have wrote so fully to Congress, upon the disagreeable consequences that may follow from starving the Quarter master's department at this critical season.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 April 1779

    Most certain, my inclination leads me to a resignation. My reputation I value more than any advantages of gain ; and I consider it in great danger.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    West Point, NY - 14 November 1779

    Your Excellency undoubtedly has frequently had under consideration a proper position for winter-quarters. It is not always in the power of a General to take a position most favorable to his wishes

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Morristown, NJ - 0 January 1780

    I have repeatedly mentioned to your Excellency, for some months past, that the supplies of money furnished the department were very unequal to the current expenses.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Morristown, NJ - 7 February 1780

    The inclosed copy of a representation from Colonel Barry, an Assistant Deputy-Quartermaster-General in this State, will show your Excellency that a new difficulty has arisen to delay transportation.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Morristown, NJ - 6 March 1780

    Inclosed I send your Excellency a copy of my last letter to Congress, to which they have given no answer, and which necessarily involves very important consequences.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 March 1780

    Many people are apprehensive for the fall of Charleston ; and I think it in jeopardy, as well as the troops under Lincoln's command. I am more anxious for the fate of the troops than the city.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 April 1780

    There would be no difficulty, either in the one case or the other, could the treasury furnish the proper supplies of cash. But in its present exhausted state, with the enormous demands upon the department, the agents have neither credit nor influence

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Morristown, NJ - 23 May 1780

    I have had a long conversation with General Schuyler this morning, and have seen the powers and appointments upon the present business intrusted to the direction of the Committee, as well as their powers to act under.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Bryants Tavern, PA - 23 June 1780

    I now acquaint you that they proceeded, with vigor, until they had gained Connecticut Farms ; they then were checked by Colonel Dayton's regiment.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Springfield, PA - 24 June 1780

    the whole force of the enemy, which has been in Jersey, went from Elizabethtown Point between twelve and one o'clock this morning.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Verplancks Point, NY - 3 August 1780

    To explain the reasons for the movement will give the army a high opinion of the confidence you have in their spirit and enterprise, and perfectly reconcile them to all the past fatigues, and to those which may follow

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Verplancks Point, NY - 5 August 1780

    I am sensible my conduct has been viewed by many in a very improper light; and I am persuaded many think the business can be done with more method, and at a less expense, than it has been.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 5 October 1780

    A new disposition of the army going to be made, and an officer appointed to the command of West Point and the district on the east side of the North River, I take the liberty just to intimate my inclinations for the appointment.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    West Point, NY - 16 October 1780

    Your Excellency's letter of the 14th, appointing me to the command of the Southern army, was delivered me last evening.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    West Point, NY - 19 October 1780

    I had given over the thoughts of going home, even if I obtained your permission, before I received your pleasure upon the subject. My affairs require it ; but I am fully convinced that the time it will take, and the state of the Southern department

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 October 1780

    On my arrival at this place, I laid your Excellency's letter before Congress, and addressed them on the business of the Southern department.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 November 1780

    The arms we are likely to get from the Board of War and this State fall far short of my expectations. The whole will not exceed fifteen hundred.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 19 November 1780

    Your weight and influence, both with Congress and this State, in support of the southern operations, will be exceedingly important and necessary to my success.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Camp Charlotte, SC - 7 December 1780

    Immediately I called a Council, respecting the practicability of holding a Council of Inquiry upon General Gates's conduct, during his command in this department.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Cheraw, SC - 28 December 1780

    I was apprehensive, on my first arrival, that the country around Charlotte was too much exhausted to afford subsistence for the army at that place for any considerable time.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Pedee, SC - 13 January 1781

    This country is so extensive, and supplies are so difficult to obtain, that it is impossible to carry on the war any length of time with the militia.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Pedee, SC - 24 January 1781

    My public letter will inform your Excellency of the success of the troops under the command of General Morgan. The event is glorious ; and I am exceedingly unhappy that our wretched condition will not permit our improving it to the best advantage.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Pedee, SC - 28 January 1781

    Lord Cornwallis continued at Weymsborough, making every preparation, and completely equipping his troops for the most active operations, until the 9th instant

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Guilford, NC - 9 February 1781

    Since I wrote your Excellency by Major Giles, Lord Cornwallis has been constantly in pursuit of the light infantry and the prisoners, and is now between the Shallow Ford, upon the Yadkin and Salem, one of the Moravian towns

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Irwins Ferry - 15 February 1781

    Lord Cornwallis has been at our heels from day to day ever since we left Guilford; and our movements from thence to this place have been of the most critical kind, having a river in our front, and the enemy in our rear.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    High Rock Ford - 28 February 1781

    We have the most unequivocal and full evidence of the disaffection of a great part of this State. The enemy have raised seven independent companies in a single day; and we have the mortification to find, that most of the prisoners we take are inhabit

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Iron Works, SC - 10 March 1781

    On the 2d, Lieutenant-Colonel Lee, with a detachment of riflemen, attacked the advance of the British army under Colonel Tarleton, near Alamanee, and killed and wounded, by report, about thirty of them.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Iron Works, SC - 18 March 1781

    My letter to Congress, a copy of which I inclose to your Excellency, will inform you of an unsuccessful action with Lord Cornwallis on the 15th. Our prospects were flattering ; and had the North Carolina militia seconded the endeavours of their offic

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Deep River, SC - 29 March 1781

    an account from Richmond, of Admiral Arbuthnot's arriving in the Chesapeake, with six ships of the line and upwards of thirty transports, with a considerable reenforcement.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    , SC - 1 May 1781

    We fight, get beat and fight again. We have so much to do and so little to do it with, that I am much afraid these States must fall, never to rise again

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Mccords Ferry, SC - 14 May 1781

    They left it with great precipitation, after burning the greater part of their baggage, and stores belonging to the inhabitants. They also burnt the jail, mill, and several other houses, and left the town little better than a heap of rubbish.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Bush River, SC - 22 June 1781

    We are anxiously waiting the arrival of the second division of the French fleet. Virginia affords the most inviting object.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Santee, SC - 17 July 1781

    It affords me great pleasure to hear that an attack is meditating against New York. This measure no doubt will create a powerful diversion in favor of this country

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Santee, SC - 6 August 1781

    Governor Rutledge arrived in camp a few days since, and informed me that a French fleet of twenty sail of the line, besides frigates, were to be on the coast by the 25th of this month, to cooperate with the American army

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Camden, SC - 26 August 1781

    the hanging of Colonel Hayne, one of our militia Colonels, whom the enemy hung in Charleston, a little time since, as a traitor, as they call him.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Santee, SC - 17 September 1781

    Since I wrote to you before, we have had a most bloody battle. It was by far the most obstinate fight I ever saw. Victory was ours

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Santee, SC - 25 October 1781

    I am happy to find the army under your command ready to commence operations against Lord Cornwallis ; but I am sorry to hear you think the issue somewhat doubtful.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    , SC - 21 November 1781

    The reduction of Charleston is an event much to be wished ; but to be able to cover the country and confine the enemy to that place, will be a great object.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    St. Pauls Parish, SC - 21 January 1782

    Through a good channel of intelligence I got information of troops expected, both from Cork and New York. I was so alarmed at it, that I sent off Captain Ragsdale to Virginia, and Lieutenant-Colonel Stewart to North Carolina, to try to hasten on supp

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    St. Pauls Parish, SC - 7 February 1782

    my apprehensions were so great, and the consequences appeared to me so fatal to this country, I made application, without hesitation

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Ponpon, SC - 9 March 1782

    Your Excellency will see by the King's speech, and other measures taking in Great Britain, the enemy are determined to prosecute the war

  • Nathanael Greene letter to John Laurens.

    , SC - 2 April 1782

    It appears the enemy have it in contemplation to attack us in our divided state; they must inevitably ruin us. You will join the army, therefore, without loss of time.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    Dorchester, SC - 8 April 1782

    Lieut. Col. Laurens joined us the night before last, and I have heard nothing further of the enemy's attack upon us.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Peter Horry.

    , SC - 10 April 1782

    I cannot decide on one part of your letter, that is, respecting half-pay. If you were entitled to half-pay on your former standing, you are entitled to it now; but, if you mean upon the present reduction proposed, there can be no half-pay

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    Dorchester, SC - 10 April 1782

    Lieut. Colonel Laurens has given me an account of the enemy's last movement, and Gen. Leslie has explained the object to me in a letter

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    , SC - 12 April 1782

    I have been of opinion some time, and got intelligence last evening, that the enemy were preparing to come out and attack us. It seems the refugees are pushing the General very hard for the purpose.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    , SC - 14 April 1782

    The prospect of a general action is not so immediate as I expected a few days ago. You will, therefore, halt in the neighborhood of Strawberry Ferry

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    , SC - 15 April 1782

    I wrote you yesterday to return to Strawberry, but, as you are so near, before you return I wish to see you, provided you come to Mr. Blake's to-night

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    , SC - 16 April 1782

    I know of no way of reinforcing you but by Col. Hampton's corps. I will speak with the Governor on the subject. At present, I believe we have no spare arms

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    , SC - 28 April 1782

    We have had no small uneasiness in our camp for want of pay, clothing and spirits. The discontent has reached the enemy, and it is confidently asserted that they are coming out to take advantage of it.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    , SC - 1 May 1782

    I wish you to take a position in the neighborhood of camp, that we may join our force on the shortest notice, should the enemy attempt anything against us.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    , SC - 19 May 1782

    Count de Grasse is a prisoner, and has lost six ships of the line; and I fear the rest of the fleet are so shattered as to be incapable of attempting any thing for a long time.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    , SC - 9 June 1782

    I had a line from you a day or two ago, and am glad to hear you are in a fair way of bringing the people upon the Pee Dee to a better temper. I wish the business was over, and you on this side the Santee.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Rudulph.

    , SC - 18 June 1782

    Your letter of resignation of this day contains an accusation no less indelicate than unjust. You say, my orders contain such injustice, and are so repugnant to your feelings, that you cannot consistent with your established rights serve me any longe

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    Cattles Plantation, SC - 9 July 1782

    Nothing reflects more honor upon an officer than accomplishing that by address which others could effect only by force; to save the effusion of human blood must be the wish of every humane and generous bosom.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Ashley River, SC - 11 July 1782

    The troops have been so badly clothed, and the season is so very hot, that many of the soldiery have been seized with fevers, which renders them unfit for service

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    , SC - 27 July 1782

    I have this moment got intelligence that the enemy are embarking a body of troops to make a descent upon Georgetown, and in all probability will be there before to-morrow night.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    , SC - 30 July 1782

    I am afraid you will now arrive too late to be of any service, unless the goods should be got up the rivers, and your force deter the enemy from following them.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    Ashley, SC - 9 August 1782

    I am sorry the enemy is so situated as to give them an opportunity to carry off the produce of the country, without your having it in your power to injure them.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Peter Horry.

    , SC - 10 August 1782

    The dissolution of your corps, or rather embodying it with other corps, I think a prudent measure. At present, I have no commands which will interfere with your wishes for retiring.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    Ashley, SC - 24 August 1782

    I have been informed that a fleet, consisting of one sloop-of-war, three galleys, three armed brigs, with ten empty sloops and schooners, having 500 infantry under Major Brewerton and Doyle on board, passed the bar of Charlestown early yesterday morn

  • Nathanael Greene letter to John Matthews.

    , SC - 29 August 1782

    The enemy landed in considerable force. The Colonel's party being small, was beat back, in which conflict the Colonel fell

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Ashley Hill, SC - 29 August 1782

    Since I wrote to your Excellency, a day or two ago, Lieutenant-Colonel Laurens has been killed in an action on the Combahee River, about fifty miles south of our camp.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    Ashley, SC - 31 August 1782

    I most sincerely congratulate you upon the very honorable check you gave the enemy, and I am happy to hear you give such ample testimony to the bravery and firmness of the militia.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    Ashley, SC - 15 September 1782

    Intelligence from town induces me to believe the enemy are making preparations for another expedition after provision, and that the neighborhood of Georgetown will be their object

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Ashley Hill, SC - 4 October 1782

    the evacuation of Charleston is reduced to a certainty. The following disposition, it is said, is to be made of the troops in garrison.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to Francis Marion.

    , SC - 30 October 1782

    Capt. Warren has written to you requesting the prisoners, mentioned in the list you enclosed, might be sent to Charlestown

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Ashley Hill, SC - 10 December 1782

    I doubt not your Excellency expected to hear of the evacuation of Charleston long before this. The enemy are not yet gone, although now just upon the eve of their departure. In two days more, the town will be free.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 16 March 1783

    The evacuation of Charleston, and the proposals of peace, are matters highly interesting to this country, whose finances and political arrangements are in the most deplorable situation. Charleston remains without a platform, or a single cannon for it

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 20 April 1783

    I beg leave to congratulate your Excellency upon the returning smiles of peace, and the happy establishment of our independence. This important event must be doubly welcome to you, who have so successfully conducted the war

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 8 August 1783

    I see, by the papers, the Northern army does not choose to be furloughed. The people here begin to be alarmed at it.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 November 1783

    I return your Excellency many thanks for your polite letter, accompanying the resolution of Congress, complimenting me with a couple of cannon.