Letters written to John Jay during the years 1776 thru 1824

John Jay

96 Letters written to John Jay from 23 author(s) including Silas Deane , and George Washington from places such as Claremount, Philadelphia, PA and Paris, FR. Who did John Jay know?

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  • Robert Livingston letter to John Jay.

    Claremount - 20 March 1776

    I sympathize most sincerely with you in your melancholy apprehensions about your parents. I know and I can feel such a loss

  • Robert Livingston letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 May 1776

    If your Congress have any spirit, they will at least build fourteen or fifteen light boats capable of carrying a twelve-pounder, to secure Hudson River, which is to be the chief scene of action.

  • Edward Rutledge letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 November 1776

    I expected long ere this to have been seated quietly at home ; but the progress which the enemy had made, and seemed likely to make, into your country, induced me to suspend my resolution

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FR - 3 December 1776

    If my letters arrive safe they will give you some idea of my situation. Without intelligence, without orders, and without remittances, yet boldly plunging into contracts, engagements, and negotiations, hourly hoping that something will arrive from Am

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 1 March 1777

    I have taken the liberty to trouble you with this hint, as sometimes things the most obvious escape attention. If you agree with me in sentiment, you will easily fall upon the most proper mode for answering the purpose.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to John Jay.

    Saratoga, NY - 6 November 1777

    When I did myself the pleasure to write you on the 17th ult., I was not apprized of the enemy's progress up Hudson's River, nor of the barbarous devastation they have been guilty of committing at Kingston

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Valley Forge, PA - 1 February 1778

    Congress have sent me here, in conjunction with some other gentlemen, to regulate their army, and in truth not a little regulation hath become necessary. Our quartermaster and commissary departments are in the most lamentable situation.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Yorktown, PA - 28 April 1778

    I choose that my friends should write freely, and those who know me must know that such freedoms need no apology. I never thought the person you allude to so steady as could be wished. We have all of us our weak sides ; would to God that were the wor

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 December 1778

    I have now committed to writing as particular an account of my agency of their affairs in Europe as my situation will permit, and wait the pleasure of Congress to lay the same before them.

  • Edward Rutledge letter to John Jay.

    Charleston, SC - 25 December 1778

    I fear with some reason (as it comes north about), that a damned infamous cabal is forming against our commander-in-chief, and that whenever they shall find themselves strong enough they will strike an important blow.

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 December 1778

    When I had the honor of waiting on Congress last, I was informed that I should be favored with an opportunity of finishing my narrative without delay.

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 January 1779

    I took the liberty of mentioning to Congress a circumstance, which made me very solicitous for a final issue of my affairs, which was the illiberal and abusive attacks made on my character

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 January 1779

    my affairs are become so pressing and so peculiarly circumstanced, that it is impossible for me to attend longer without doing greater prejudice to myself and interest

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 February 1779

    I hope I shall not be deemed guilty of an unbecoming impatience in pressing to know, if Congress have any further commands for me, and in what manner my past transactions, as their agent and commissioner, are to be adjusted and closed.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to John Jay.

    unknown - 14 March 1779

    This is, to raise two, three, or four battalions of negroes, with the assistance of the government of that state, by contributions from the owners, in proportion to the number they possess.

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 March 1779

    I have now only to add, that my situation, which for eight months past has been peculiarly distressing, is now become such as to oblige me to leave this city without further delay

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 March 1779

    You were pleased to inform me verbally, that my letter was referred to the committee, who were ordered to report immediately.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 0 April 1779

    If, under this sanction, I should step beyond the line you would wish to draw, and suggest ideas or ask questions which are improper to be answered, you hare only to pass them by in silence.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 14 April 1779

    The circumstance of which you have obliged me with a communication, is among a number of other instances of the unfriendly views which have governed a certain gentleman from a very early period.

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 April 1779

    I ask liberty to refer to the two last letters, which I did myself the honor of writing to you on the 30th ult. and 2d instant, and which remain unanswered.

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 April 1779

    As I shall be obliged to leave Philadelphia in a few days at farthest, I have again to solicit a decisive reply to my last.

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 April 1779

    It is now more than twelve months since, in obedience to their orders, I left France, to return to my native country.

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 April 1779

    I heard yesterday, by accident, that an honorable gentleman in Congress had made a calculation from the general account, which I gave in my narrative of the price of the clothes purchased in France

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 April 1779

    In my letter of Monday last, I mentioned my intention to leave town in the course of the week. I am now waiting for no other purpose, but to know if Congress will take notice of the requests

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 10 May 1779

    To me it appears that our affairs are in a very delicate situation ; and what is not the least to be lamented is, that many people think they are in a very flourishing way ; and seem in a great measure insensible to the danger with which we are threa

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 May 1779

    You will much oblige me, by informing me what resolutions Congress have come to on my letters of the 26th, 27th, and 30th ult. as well as on the petitions I have repeatedly made

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 May 1779

    As this will probably be the last time I shall trouble Congress with my addresses to them, I hope to be indulged in briefly laying before them the following observations on my case and situation.

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 August 1779

    I do myself the honor of enclosing a memorial, which I Beg of you to lay before Congress as early as may be

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 September 1779

    I take the liberty of addressing you on the subject of a memorial I presented to Congress

  • Robert Livingston letter to John Jay.

    Kingston, NY - 6 October 1779

    I have just now heard that you are upon the point of leaving us. I might have expected to have received this intelligence from yourself, rather than from loose report

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    West Point, NY - 7 October 1779

    Among the number of your friends, permit me also to congratulate you, and my country, on your late honourable and important appointment.

  • Edmund Pendleton letter to John Jay.

    Edmundsbury, ENG - 11 October 1779

    I congratulate you, sir, upon your appointment to represent the American States at the court of Madrid ; the just testimony of that confidence which the honourable body you have presided over, have in your abilities and integrity.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Jay.

    Passy, FRA - 13 June 1780

    Several of them appear to have been opened, the paper round the seals being smoked and burnt, as with the flame of a candle used to soften the wax, and the impression defaced. The curiosity of people in this time of war is unbounded.

  • James Lovell letter to John Jay.

    unknown - 11 July 1780

    Mr. Searle is the bearer of this, via France, and Mr. Laurens will either go for Holland in the same ship, the Jay, or will sail in a few days by another opportunity for Holland.

  • Robert Livingston letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 August 1780

    Your remembrance of the pleasurable days of our youth, and the scenes in which we mutually bore our parts, together with the attractions which this country still has for you, afford me the most pleasing hope that neither time nor absence will weaken

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Jay.

    Passy, FRA - 2 October 1780

    the storm of bills which I found coming upon us both, has terrified and vexed me to such a degree that I have been deprived of sleep, and so much indisposed by continual anxiety, as to be rendered almost incapable of writing.

  • Robert Morris letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 June 1781

    This campaign, as usual, opens to our disadvantage ; but I expect it will also, as usual, close favourably for us. The vices and follies of our enemies may justly be counted among the number of our fast friends.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Jay.

    Passy, FRA - 22 April 1782

    I have undertaken to pay all the bills of your acceptance that have come to my knowledge, and I hope in God no more will be drawn upon us

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Jay.

    Passy, FRA - 24 April 1782

    In consequence of a proposition I sent over, the parliament of Britain have just passed an act for exchanging American prisoners. They have near 1100 in the jails of England and Ireland, all committed as charged with high treason.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Verplancks Point, NY - 18 October 1782

    We have now passed another campaign, and no very important occurrence has intervened on this side the Atlantic.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 January 1783

    Men are forgetful, and therefore it will be well by timely declarations of your sentiments to recall your conduct while in Congress. You and I differ about the western country, but you and your sovereign are of the same option.

  • Robert Morris letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 January 1783

    I cannot take time at present to enter on any political discussions. But you must allow me to declare my perfect satisfaction in, and approbation of, your conduct in Europe.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 July 1783

    All have united in the warmest approbation of your conduct. I cannot forbear telling you this, because my situation has given me access to the truth

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Jay.

    Passy, FRA - 10 September 1783

    having now spent fifty years of my life in public offices and trusts, and having still one ambition left, that of carrying the character of fidelity, at least, to the grave with me, I cannot allow that I was behind any of them in zeal and faithfulnes

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 September 1783

    The British employ themselves about the evacuation of New York, but that business goes on slowly. I am however informed from tolerable authority, that they will be gone by the beginning of November.

  • Robert Morris letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 November 1783

    I acknowledge the force of all your observations on my intended resignation, and know the necessity of perseverance so long as there is a prospect of being useful

  • Robert Morris letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 November 1783

    I congratulate you on the signing of the definitive treaty.. and on the evacuation of New- York, which took place on Tuesday. Our friend Gouverneur Morris is there.

  • Robert Livingston letter to John Jay.

    New York, NY - 29 November 1783

    Our enemies are hardly more astonished than we are ourselves, and than you will be when you hear that we have been five days in town without the smallest disturbance

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 January 1784

    Your attachment to America, when removed from it, is the old story of travellers ; but when it comes from one in whose feelings we feel an interest, decies repetita placebit.

  • Silas Deane letter to John Jay.

    London, ENG - 21 January 1784

    I am at a loss what to conclude on, whether my letter might have failed, or that you do not incline to favour me with an interview ; and hence I am induced to trouble you with this

  • Robert Livingston letter to John Jay.

    New York, NY - 25 January 1784

    Our parties are, first, the tories, who still hope for power, under the idea that the remembrance of the past should be lost, though they daily keep it up by their avowed attachment to Great Britain.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to John Jay.

    New York, NY - 18 February 1784

    I think I hear you wish to be advised of what is passing in your native country, at a juncture when the decisions of government must determine the philosophers and politicians of Europe to form their opinion of our wisdom or our folly.

  • John Adams letter to John Jay.

    Hague, NED - 2 April 1784

    By leading a quiet life, and by great care and regular exercise, I have happily recovered a little health, and if you think it necessary, I might now venture on a journey to Paris.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to John Jay.

    Albany, NY - 7 October 1784

    Until a few days ago, I had no doubt but to hear you had accepted the appointment conferred upon you. My fears, however, have been raised, and with my usual frankness I assure you that your refusal could not but be attended with very bad circumstance

  • William Bingham letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 16 October 1784

    I hope your public appointment will prove an agreeable surprise to you on your arrival, and that you will be able to reconcile the acceptance of it to every consideration of private interest and convenience, as well as public duty.

  • letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 11 May 1785

    Thomas Jefferson letter to John Jay... appointing me their Minister Plenipotentiary at this court...

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 12 July 1785

    While Captain Jones was hovering on the coast of England, in the year 1779, a British pilot, John Jackson by name, came on board him, supposing him to be British. Captain Jones found it convenient to detain him as a pilot

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 14 August 1785

    I took an opportunity of asking the Count de Vergennes, whether the Chevalier Luzerne proposed to return to America. He answered me that he did; and that he was here, for a time only, to arrange his private affairs.

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 23 August 1785

    I shall sometimes ask your permission to write you letters, not official, but private. The present is of this kind, and is occasioned by the question proposed in yours of June the 14th; 'Whether it would be useful to us, to carry all our own producti

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 30 August 1785

    I enclose you a correspondence which has taken place between the Marechal de Castries, minister of the Marine, and myself. It is on the subject of the prize-money, due to the officers and crew of the Alliance

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 27 September 1785

    It gave me great pleasure to hear of your appointment as secretary of the United States for the department of foreign affairs ; a happier choice in my opinion could not have been made

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 6 October 1785

    The Emperor and Dutch have signed preliminaries, which are now made public. You will see them in the papers which accompany this. They still leave a good deal to discussion.

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 2 January 1786

    Several conferences and letters having passed between the Count de Vergennes and myself, on the subject of the commerce of this country with the United States, I think them sufficiently interesting to be communicated to Congress.

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to John Jay.

    London, ENG - 12 March 1786

    The date of a letter from London will doubtless be as unexpected to you as it was unforeseen by myself, a few days ago.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 3 September 1788

    With peculiar pleasure I now congratulate you on the success of your labours to obtain an unconditional ratification of the proposed constitution in the Convention of your State

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 4 March 1789

    my present opinion is, that until some time after the States- General shall have assembled, this government will offer little or nothing for the contemplation of your department.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 1 July 1789

    I am too much occupied to find time for the use of a cipher, and in effect, the government here is so much occupied with their own affairs, that in transmitting to you a letter under an envelope, there is no risk.

  • Rufus King letter to John Jay.

    London, ENG - 18 March 1790

    According to present appearances, the war must recommence between France and Austria, if it has not already begun ; but that an honest and solid confederacy against France is likely to take place between the great powers

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 November 1790

    This is the first symptom of a spirit which must either be killed, or will kill the constitution of the United States. I send the resolutions to you, that it may be considered what ought to be done.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 September 1791

    The indisposition, and consequent absence from Mount Vernon, of my nephew, Major Washington, to whom the care of my private business is intrusted, makes it indispensably necessary for me to go home before the meeting of Congress.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 September 1792

    There is really, my dear sir, a crisis in the affairs of the country, which demands the most mature consideration of its best and wisest friends.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 December 1792

    Willingly, however, would I relinquish my share of the command to the anti-federalists, if I thought they were to be trusted. But I have so many proofs of the contrary, as to make me dread the experiment of their preponderance.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 August 1794

    On this irregular and high-handed proceeding of Mr. Simcoe, which is no longer masked, I would rather hear what the ministry of Great Britain will say, than pronounce my own sentiments thereon.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 November 1794

    That the self-created societies which have spread themselves over this country, have been labouring incessantly to sow the seeds of distrust, jealousy, and of course discontent, thereby hoping to effect some revolution in the government, is not unkno

  • letter to John Jay.

    Hague, NED - 2 December 1794

    John Quincy Adams letter to John Jay... The desire of peace among all the friends and supporters of the government in this country is animated to the highest degree by the prevailing opinion of an irresistible necessity.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 December 1794

    As I expected, and as you have been informed the result would probably be, so it has happened, that the western insurrection has terminated highly honourable for this country

  • William Grenville letter to John Jay.

    London, ENG - 11 May 1795

    Since you left us, the news of the arrival of the treaty in America has reached us. We were singularly unfortunate in the loss of the Tankenville packet.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 September 1795

    You will have learned from the public gazettes, and through other more authentic channels, that all that rested with me to do, to give ratification to the treaty between this country and Great Britain, is already accomplished.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 December 1795

    My information with respect to the general disposition of the people, accords with yours; and I have little doubt of a perfect amelioration of sentiment, alter the present fermentation (which is not only subsiding, but changing) has evaporated a litt

  • William Grenville letter to John Jay.

    Cleaveland Row, ENG - 17 March 1796

    I have, since you left us, taken one occasion to renew to you my assurances of the sincere esteem and friendship with which your whole conduct has impressed me, and of the high sense which I entertain of your virtues and talents.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 March 1796

    The purport of it is pleasing ; but the conduct of the British armed vessels in the West Indies is intolerable beyond all forbearance.

  • William Grenville letter to John Jay.

    Dropmore, ENG - 9 July 1796

    With respect to the impressments, I am confident that such orders as you speak of have been more than once repeated.

  • William Wilberforce letter to John Jay.

    Elmdon House, ENG - 7 November 1805

    my object in now taking up the pen is, to recommend earnestly to your serious perusal and impartial consideration, a pamphlet which I will take the liberty of transmitting to you

  • William Wilberforce letter to John Jay.

    East Bourne, ENG - 1 August 1809

    Though so many years have passed since we saw or heard from each other, I hope I do not deceive myself when I presume that we continue to retain each other in friendly remembrance

  • William Wilberforce letter to John Jay.

    Kensington, ENG - 18 July 1810

    My parliamentary duties force me to be within easy reach of London all the winter, and even spring, and sometimes for a part of the summer. I have a very affectionate wife, who is always unwilling to be at a distance from me

  • Richard Peters letter to John Jay.

    Belmont, PA - 25 November 1810

    It is really true, that now, for nearly six years, I have abandoned wine and all stimulants, segars and rich food included. Every thing increasing and accelerating the blood is hostile to my health

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    unknown - 25 February 1813

    Last Tuesday evening my wife was delivered of a boy. I communicate that event because I believe it will give you pleasure.

  • Noah Webster letter to John Jay.

    Amherst, MA - 9 June 1813

    On the subject of orthography, gentlemen might have been easy, as any considerable changes must prevent the sale and use of a work of this sort, and they might rationally conclude that I would not put myself to an immense trouble and expense, to writ

  • Timothy Pickering letter to John Jay.

    Washington, MD - 22 October 1814

    While the proposition respecting an Indian boundary was declared to be a sine qua non, the boundary itself admitted of modification ; and as within it, we are called upon to relinquish only our right of pre-emption

  • Richard Peters letter to John Jay.

    Belmont, PA - 19 January 1815

    The enjoyment of liberty is fugacious ; but despotism, under a variety of shapes, is permanent. There is a tendency to it in all human political institutions ; and the people of every country have, from time immemorial, forged their own chains.

  • Richard Peters letter to John Jay.

    Belmont, PA - 12 December 1815

    Although our correspondence is rare, my most sincere regards for you are uninterrupted. I have outlived, and so have you, so many old friends and contemporaries, that the very few left are the more valuable for their scarcity

  • John Adams letter to John Jay.

    Quincy, MA - 9 January 1819

    My family are reading it to me every evening, and though we have not finished it, we have proceeded far enough to excite an earnest desire to know your opinion of it.

  • Richard Peters letter to John Jay.

    Belmont, PA - 25 November 1820

    Every occurrence in which you have shared, or originated, seems, by some strange perversion, to be misunderstood or misstated by the present generation, when some favourite individual or topic induces the obliquity.

  • Noah Webster letter to John Jay.

    Amherst, MA - 0 November 1821

    But in searching for the originals of English words, I soon found the field of etymology had been imperfectly explored ; and one discovery succeeding another, my curiosity was excited to persevere in the pursuit.

  • George Otis letter to John Jay.

    Quincy, MA - 19 February 1822

    Your remarks on the first volume of Botta, confirmed as they were by Presidents Adams and Jefferson, were communicated to the reviewers of my translation of that author, and were by them introduced into their account of the work published

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to John Jay.

    Monticello, VA - 10 November 1824

    As soon as I found myself once more on the happy shore of America, one of my first inquiries was after you, and the means to get to my old friend.