John Jay Letters for the years 1776 thru 1827

John Jay

John Jay wrote 217 Letters from a total of 20 locations including Philadelphia, PA, New York, NY, and Fishkill, NY. John Jay wrote a total of 96 people including George Washington, and Alexander Hamilton. Most of John Jay's letters were written in the year 1794. Several other letters were written in 1783 and 1785. Who did John Jay know? View John Jay's social graph.

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  • sponsored contentJohn Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 25 July 1787

    Permit me to hint whether it would not be wise and seasonable to provide a strong check to the admission of foreigners into the administration of our national government

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Mcdougall.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 March 1776

    I am by no means without my apprehensions of danger from that licentiousness which in your situation is not uncommon ; nothing will contribute more to its suppression than a vigorous exertion of the powers vested in your Convention and Committee of S

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Mcdougall.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 April 1776

    Many of the reasons you allege for delaying taxation are weighty, and I confess did not occur to me. It is certainly unreasonable to impose on the city, in its present circumstances, so great a share of the public expenses.

  • John Jay letter to Robert Livingston.

    New York, NY - 29 May 1776

    Our Convention will, I believe, institute a better government than the present, which in my opinion will no longer work anything but mischief

  • John Jay letter to Edward Rutledge.

    Fishkill, NY - 11 October 1776

    Let no considerations induce you to excuse General Mifflin from the office of quarter-master-general. Moyland acted wisely and honestly in resigning.

  • John Jay letter to William Livingston.

    New York, NY - 22 March 1777

    Your militia bill should have been so framed as to give birth to strong and decisive executive powers.

  • John Jay letter to Sarah Livingston.

    Kingston, NY - 25 March 1777

    We have lately received an uncertain, though unpleasant, account of the enemy's landing at Peekskill. How did your nerves bear the shock ? My father and mother, I apprehend, were very uneasy.

  • John Jay letter to Leonard Gansevoort.

    Kingston, NY - 5 June 1777

    Mr. Cuyler informs me, that some of my friends in your county have done me the honour of naming me, among other candidates, for the office of governor.

  • John Jay letter to Sarah Livingston.

    Kingston, NY - 6 July 1777

    When I consider that one of the reasons assigned for the creation of woman was, "that it is not good for man to be alone," I find my present situation condemned, not only by my own feelings, but by divine authority.

  • John Jay letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Fishkill, NY - 11 December 1777

    As to your loss of influence among a certain body, it is less so than you may imagine. The virtuous and sensible still retain their former sentiments.

  • John Jay letter to Philip Schuyler.

    unknown - 12 February 1778

    I hope you will seriously determine to serve your country, at least in a legislative capacity.

  • John Jay letter to Philip Schuyler.

    , NY - 26 February 1778

    as I have too long kept you in suspense relative to the farm you was so kind as to offer me, I ought now to acquaint you that I am under a necessity of denying myself the pleasure of being your neighbour.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    , NY - 11 March 1778

    Pennsylvania, I believe, is sick unto death. It will nevertheless recover, though perhaps not soon. Weak and bad constitutions incline to chronical disorders.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Albany, NY - 29 April 1778

    I am now engaged in the most disagreeable part of my duty, trying criminals. They multiply exceedingly. Robberies become frequent : the woods afford them shelter, and the tories food.

  • John Jay letter to Robert Livingston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 January 1779

    Now is the season for exertion. Attend regularly. Confirm those who esteem you and their country. Convert or confound those who would sacrifice either to private views.

  • John Jay letter to Robert Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 February 1779

    When characters rendered amiable by virtues and important by talents, are exposed to suspicions, and become subjects of investigation, the sensibility of individuals as well as the interest of the public are concerned in the event of the inquiry.

  • John Jay letter to Robert Livingston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 February 1779

    The complexions of resignation, of soft complaint, and joyless sensibility, are so blended in your letter, that if anonymous, one would suppose it written by a wayworn traveller through this vale of tears

  • John Jay letter to Robert Livingston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 March 1779

    The state of your politics is much as I expected. I fear some of your measures are more severe than wisdom or humanity will justify.

  • John Jay letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 March 1779

    So uncertain has been the fate of letters during the course of this war, that I very seldom write one without adverting to the possibility and consequences of its miscarriage and publication.

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Lincoln.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 April 1779

    Although I have not the honour of a personal acquaintance with you, yet I am so well informed of your character as to believe you will always be happy in leading a young soldier to glory

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 April 1779

    I was sure of your politeness, but not certain of a more than usual degree of confidence. The latter has now been made manifest, and, permit me to assure you, it shall be mutual.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 April 1779

    While the maritime affairs of the Continent continue under the direction of a Committee, they will be exposed to all the consequences of want of system, attention, and knowledge.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 August 1779

    Britain refused the mediation of Spain at a time when their spirits were elated by their successes in the West Indies and the Southern States, and by the accounts they received of discord in Congress

  • John Jay letter to Samuel Huntingdon.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 October 1779

    my conduct in the chair and in the execution of public business has been honoured by the approbation of Congress. The testimony given of it by this act, demands my warmest acknowledgments.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 October 1779

    The only satisfaction I promise myself from this appointment, will flow from the rectitude with which the duties of it will be discharged, and not from a prospect of general approbation.

  • John Jay letter to Kate Livingston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 November 1779

    A report has just reached here that the enemy have visited Elizabethtown, and burnt your father's house.

  • John Jay letter to Egbert Benson.

    Aranjuez, ESP - 0 June 1780

    Our plans of life have, within these few years past, been strangely changed. Our country, I hope, will be the better for the alterations. How far we, individually, may be benefited, is more questionable.

  • John Jay letter to T Matlack.

    St Ildefonso, ESP - 17 September 1780

    Knowledge is essential to the duration of liberty, and Pennsylvania is wise in making them both the objects of public care.

  • John Jay letter to James Lovell.

    Madrid, ESP - 27 October 1780

    It is true that I might write to Congress very often, indeed by every vessel, and there are many of them ; but how are my letters to get to the seaside ? By the post ? They would be all inspected, and many suppressed.

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Franklin.

    Madrid, ESP - 30 October 1780

    Bills to the amount of 100,000 dollars have arrived. A loan cannot be effected here. What the court will do is as yet uncertain, and will long continue so.

  • John Jay letter to Egbert Benson.

    Madrid, ESP - 0 November 1780

    I have a favour to ask of you ; it is that you would make a visit to my father, and send me a minute account of his health, and that of the family. Make a half dozen copies of your letter, and send them

  • John Jay letter to Robert Morris.

    Madrid, ESP - 19 November 1780

    I have lately received a letter from Francis Child, a lad whom I had taken by the hand after his father's death, and put apprentice to Mr. Dunlap, your printer.

  • John Jay letter to E Gerry.

    Madrid, ESP - 9 January 1781

    Your Constitution gives me much satisfaction. It appears to me to be, upon the whole, wisely formed and well digested. I find that it describes your State as being in New-England, as well as in America. Perhaps it would be better if these distinction

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Franklin.

    Madrid, ESP - 21 February 1781

    Affairs here begin to wear a better aspect. I am promised 3,000,000 rials, that is, 150,000 dollars, which, though inadequate to the demands upon me, is still a great consolation, especially as men who are at the pains of planting and watering trees,

  • John Jay letter to Egbert Benson.

    Madrid, ESP - 0 March 1781

    The vulgar proverb, out of sight, out of mind, always appeared to me in the light of a vulgar error, when applied to old friends and companions. I hope I have not been mistaken

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Madrid, ESP - 29 March 1781

    I take the liberty of sending you a cask of Packaretti, the favourite wine of our late friend, Don Juan, whose death I much lament.

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Franklin.

    Madrid, ESP - 0 April 1781

    Notwithstanding my repeated and earnest applications to the Count de Florida Blanca, I have as yet been able to obtain only $34,880 of the 8150,000 expressly promised me in December last.

  • John Jay letter to Charles Thompson.

    Madrid, ESP - 23 April 1781

    The able manner in which it treats the important subject of American finances induced me to give that part of it to the minister, and to send a copy of the same extract to Dr. Franklin

  • John Jay letter to J Smith.

    Aranjuez, ESP - 5 June 1781

    We wait with impatience for further information respecting the military operations in the southern States. Lord Cornwallis's expedition bears some marks of rashness, and I cannot but expect he will have some reason to repent it.

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Franklin.

    Madrid, ESP - 9 July 1781

    A vessel has arrived at Bilboa, in twenty-four days from Salem. I received by her some family letters, which came from Bilboa under cover to a gentleman here.

  • John Jay letter to Silas Talbot.

    Madrid, ESP - 14 July 1781

    Not being authorized by Congress to provide for American prisoners in England, I could not justify undertaking it, and therefore referred your application to Dr. Franklin

  • John Jay letter to Frederick Jay.

    Madrid, ESP - 31 July 1781

    We have heard (though not from you) that a number of armed robbers have paid you a visit, and taken from the family their money, plate, &c. ; it is also said that they behaved towards our father, Peter, and Nancy, with more decency and respect than p

  • John Jay letter to Peter Jay.

    Madrid, ESP - 1 August 1781

    Several letters I have received from Jersey and Philadelphia mention your having been robbed in April last by a number of armed men. It is said, they behaved with uncommon respect to you

  • John Jay letter to William Bingham.

    St Ildefonso, ESP - 8 September 1781

    Your representation of the state of our affairs is flattering, and affords reason to hope that the enemy will soon cease to deceive themselves and others by groundless expectations of conquest.

  • John Jay letter to Henry Knox.

    Madrid, ESP - 10 December 1781

    The harmony subsisting between the French troops and ours, is an agreeable, as well as an important circumstance, and I am glad that the Marquis De La Fayette had an opportunity of cutting some sprigs of laurel on one of the enemy's redoubts.

  • John Jay letter to George Clinton.

    Madrid, ESP - 23 February 1782

    I congratulate you on the successful issue of the last campaign, to the brilliancy of which the late surrender of Fort St. Philip, at Mahon, has much contributed.

  • John Jay letter to Robert Morris.

    Madrid, ESP - 25 April 1782

    Mrs. Jay's time is much employed in nursing and amusing herself with her little girl. She is writing to Mrs. Morris. We are cheerful, and not unhappy, though distant from our friends

  • John Jay letter to Armand Marc.

    Madrid, ESP - 26 June 1782

    Your friend, Mons. Risleau, at Bordeaux, pleased me much ; there is a frankness in his manner, and a warmth about his heart, that is very engaging. I made some agreeable acquaintances in that city, and wish I could have staid longer with them.

  • John Jay letter to Robert Livingston.

    Madrid, ESP - 13 August 1782

    Almost ever since my arrival here I have had, and still have, a sick family. The epidemic disorder which has spread through the northern part of Europe has been severe upon us. I am free from it at present, but it has taken from me some flesh and muc

  • John Jay letter to Robert Morris.

    Madrid, ESP - 13 October 1782

    This has led me to make your sons the subject of this letter. It is an interesting one to you, and therefore not indifferent to me.

  • John Jay letter to Juliana Penn.

    Madrid, ESP - 4 December 1782

    Your ladyship will, therefore, see the necessity as well as propriety of applying after the war, to the Legislature of Pennsylvania, for a reconsideration of the act respecting your family.

  • John Jay letter to Robert Livingston.

    Madrid, ESP - 14 December 1782

    Some of my colleagues flatter themselves with the probability of obtaining compensation for damages. I have no objections to a further trial, but I confess I doubt its success, for Britain has no money to spare

  • John Jay letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    Rouen, FRA - 19 January 1783

    If I am not mistaken, a copy of the American preliminaries has been sent to Spain ; and I flatter myself that Count de Montmorin will think them perfectly consistent with our engagements to our allies.

  • John Jay letter to Silas Deane.

    Madrid, ESP - 22 February 1783

    The time has been, when my writing to you would not have depended on such a circumstance, for you are not mistaken in supposing that I was once your friend.

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Vaughan.

    Madrid, ESP - 28 March 1783

    So far as the peace respects France and America, I am persuaded it was wise in Britain to conclude it. The cessions to France are not, in my opinion, extravagant

  • John Jay letter to Robert Morris.

    Madrid, ESP - 8 April 1783

    Permit me to introduce to you a gentleman who is going to help you to pay tuxes, and to participate in the liberties which render them necessary, viz. Mr. Joshua Grigley.

  • John Jay letter to Francis Child.

    Madrid, ESP - 11 May 1783

    You belong to a large and helpless family, and I wish to see you as able, as I hope you would be willing, to provide for them.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Passy, FRA - 13 June 1783

    I have, within these few days past, road and admired your address to the army, and their proceedings in consequence of it.

  • John Jay letter to M Livingston.

    Passy, FRA - 12 July 1783

    I have long been accustomed to hear, and I might add read, so much in which the heart has no concern, that the few letters like yours which reach me, arc particularly welcome.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Passy, FRA - 17 July 1783

    Our friend Morris, I suspect, is not a favourite of this court. They say, he treats them as his cashier. They refuse absolutely to supply more money.

  • John Jay letter to Robert Livingston.

    Passy, FRA - 19 July 1783

    The reluctance with which the States in general pay the necessary taxes, is much to be regretted ; it injures both their reputation and interest abroad, as well as at home, and tends to cherish the hopes and speculations of those who wish we may beco

  • John Jay letter to Robert Morris.

    Passy, FRA - 20 July 1783

    Your intended resignation alarmed me, and would have been followed with ill consequences to our affairs. I rejoice that you continue in office, and by no means regret that it will be less in your power than inclination to retire soon.

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Franklin.

    Passy, FRA - 11 September 1783

    I have no reason whatever to believe that you was averse to our obtaining the lull extent of boundary and fishery secured to us by the treaty.

  • John Jay letter to Robert Livingston.

    Passy, FRA - 12 September 1783

    Europe hears much, and wishes to hear more of divisions, seditions, violences, and confusions among us. The tories are generally and greatly pitied, more indeed than they deserve.

  • John Jay letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Passy, FRA - 16 September 1783

    While government remains relaxed, and the laws have yet to acquire a due degree of respect and obedience, men of talents, weight, and influence should exert themselves to establish and maintain constitutional authority and subordination.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Passy, FRA - 24 September 1783

    I have, as yet, met with neither men nor things on this side of the water which abate my predilection, or, if you please, my prejudices in favour of those on the other.

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    Passy, FRA - 28 September 1783

    The character and talents of delegates to Congress daily become more and more important, and I regret your declining that appointment at this interesting period.

  • John Jay letter to Charles Thompson.

    London, ENG - 14 November 1783

    In my opinion, no plan or system of conduct respecting America is yet decided upon by the cabinet, in which the jarring principles of whig and tory still strive and ferment.

  • John Jay letter to Kate Livingston.

    Bath, ENG - 24 December 1783

    I have letters from Sally almost every week. Thank God, she continues well. She tells me our little girls grow charmingly. My absence from her has been much longer than I expected.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Madrid, ESP - 10 February 1784

    You suppose that ill health induces me to resign. You are mistaken. It seldom happens that any measure is prompted by one single motive, though one among others may sometimes have decisive weight and influence.

  • John Jay letter to Silas Deane.

    Chaillot, FRA - 23 February 1784

    It is painful to say disagreeable things to any person, and especially to those with whom one has lived in habits of friendship ; but candour on this subject forbids reserve.

  • John Jay letter to Robert Morris.

    Madrid, ESP - 25 February 1784

    I have never broken the bands of friendship in my life, nor when once broken, have I ever been anxious to mend them.

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Vaughan.

    Chaillot, FRA - 21 March 1784

    The violence of your political storm seems to have abated, but I should not be surprised if you should frequently have March weather.

  • John Jay letter to Witherspoon.

    Chaillot, FRA - 6 April 1784

    The public, with us, are, in my opinion, so deeply interested in the education of our citizens, that universities, &c, ought no longer to be regarded in the light of mere private corporations. The government should extend to them their constant care

  • John Jay letter to Kate Livingston.

    Chaillot, FRA - 7 April 1784

    God only knows what futurity may have in store for us, or what adverse events may still continue to teach us lessons of resignation. It is happy for us, however, that hope is our constant companion

  • John Jay letter to Charles Thompson.

    Chaillot, FRA - 7 April 1784

    While I stay, Mr. Norris shall perceive that he could have brought few recommendations to me so acceptable as yours, and those amiable qualities for which you commend him.

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Vaughan.

    New York, NY - 2 September 1784

    The health of my family and myself is better than usual, and I begin to flatter myself that if you and Mrs. Vaughan could enjoy this country in only half the degree that I do, you would not greatly regret leaving Old England.

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Vaughan.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 November 1784

    A sufficient number of members to form a Congress not having arrived at Trenton, I passed on to this place ten days ago, to visit my friends.

  • John Jay letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    New York, NY - 19 January 1785

    Advices from Kentucky inform us that they are threatened with an Indian war ; and there is some room to conjecture that such an event would not be disagreeable to our western neighbours, who, if they do interfere, will certainly be more cunning than

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Rush.

    New York, NY - 24 March 1785

    I consider knowledge to be the soul of a republic ; and as the weak and the wicked are generally in alliance, as much care should be taken to diminish the number of the former, as of the latter. Education is the way to do this

  • John Jay letter to John Adams.

    New York, NY - 31 March 1785

    I have the honour of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a certified copy of an act of Congress of the 21st instant, instructing you to communicate to Mr. St. Saphorin

  • John Jay letter to Grand.

    New York, NY - 28 April 1785

    I have accepted the office which Congress was pleased to offer me, and shall be much obliged to vou for such intelligence from time to time as you may think useful for me to receive, and prudent for you to communicate.

  • John Jay letter to William Bingham.

    New York, NY - 31 May 1785

    Our frontier posts still have British garrisons, and we are impatient to hear why they are not. evacuated. Mr. Adams, I suppose, is by this time in London ; his letters will remove our suspense on that head.

  • John Jay letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    New York, NY - 15 July 1785

    Let me request the continuance of your correspondence, and be assured that it will always give me pleasure to communicate to you such intelligence respecting American occurrences as may appear interesting.

  • John Jay letter to Adrienne Lafayette.

    New York, NY - 13 August 1785

    Our men, for the most part, mind their business, and our women their families ; and if our wives succeed (as most of them do) in "making home man's best delight," gallantry seldom draws their husbands from them.

  • John Jay letter to John Adams.

    New York, NY - 6 September 1785

    The frequent solecisms, observable for some years past in the politics of the court of London, render it exceedingly difficult to divine how they will think and act under almost any given circumstances.

  • John Jay letter to Price.

    New York, NY - 27 September 1785

    That men should pray and fight for their own freedom, and yet keep others in slavery, is certainly acting a very inconsistent, as well as unjust and, perhaps, impious part ; but the history of mankind is filled with instances of human improprieties.

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Franklin.

    New York, NY - 4 October 1785

    It strikes me that you will find it somewhat difficult to manage the two parties in Pennsylvania. It is much to be wished that union and harmony may be established there, and if you accomplish it much honour and many blessings will result from it.

  • John Jay letter to John Adams.

    New York, NY - 11 October 1785

    Your letters, as yet, are silent respecting the evacuation of our frontier posts. I do not mean to press you either to do or say any thing unseasonably about it ; for there are times and tides in human affairs to be watched and observed.

  • John Jay letter to John Adams.

    New York, NY - 1 November 1785

    We concur so perfectly in sentiment respecting public affairs, and what ought to be done, that I find no occasion to enlarge on those heads.

  • John Jay letter to .

    New York, NY - 24 November 1785

    Mr. Temple presented to me this morning the commission which I have now the honour of transmitting to your excellency herewith enclosed. It appoints him consulgeneral of his Britannic majesty, throughout the United States of America.

  • John Jay letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    New York, NY - 19 January 1786

    Congress has been composed of so few States actually represented, as not to have it in their power to pay that attention to their foreign affairs which they would doubtless have otherwise done.

  • John Jay letter to John Adams.

    New York, NY - 22 February 1786

    Nine States are not yet represented in Congress, and therefore the affairs of this department continue in the same state that they were in at the date of my last.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 2 March 1786

    In December, a young man, under the influence of more important advisers, made an attack in the papers, which rendered the publication of my correspondence with him expedient.

  • John Jay letter to Lushington.

    New York, NY - 10 March 1786

    I have been favoured with your letter of the 22d ult., and immediately communicated it to the committee of our society for promoting the liberation of slaves, and protecting such as may be manumitted.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 16 March 1786

    An opinion begins to prevail, that a General Convention for revising the articles of Confederation would be expedient.

  • John Jay letter to Lansdown.

    New York, NY - 16 April 1786

    Your lordship's conjectures respecting the new principles of trade and finance will probably be realized. We hear of several circumstances which look and promise well.

  • John Jay letter to Lansdown.

    New York, NY - 20 April 1786

    I perfectly agree in sentiment with your lordship, that it much concerns the honour and future intercourse of both countries to have the treaty of peace duly and faithfully executed.

  • John Jay letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    New York, NY - 10 June 1786

    Successful revolutions and victorious arms have always a degree of splendour about them, which shines at a great distance, and excites admiration, whether well or ill founded.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 June 1786

    Our affairs seem to lead to some crisis; some revolution ; something that I cannot foresee, or conjecture. I am uneasy and apprehensive ; more so than during the war.

  • John Jay letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    New York, NY - 14 July 1786

    Considering the importance of our commerce with Portugal, it gives me pleasure to learn that a treaty with that kingdom was so nearly concluded. Until our affairs shall be more perfectly arranged, we shall treat under disadvantages

  • John Jay letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    New York, NY - 27 October 1786

    A spirit of licentiousness has infected Massachusetts, which appears more formidable than some at first apprehended. Whether similar symptoms will not soon mark a like disease in several other States is very problematical.

  • John Jay letter to John Adams.

    New York, NY - 1 November 1786

    When government, either from defects in its construction or administration, ceases to assert its rights, or is too feeble to afford security, inspire confidence, and overawe the ambitious and licentious, the best citizens naturally grow uneasy and lo

  • John Jay letter to Jacob Reed.

    New York, NY - 12 December 1786

    The recess (if I may so call it) of Congress gives their officers too much leisure at present ; and there is reason to fear, that the members will be as long in convening this year as they were last.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 7 January 1787

    Shall we have a King ? Not, in my opinion, while other expedients remain untried. Might we not have a Governor-General, limited in his prerogatives and duration ?

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 4 July 1788

    I congratulate you, my dear Sir, on the adoption of the Constitution by Virginia. That event has disappointed the expectation of opposition here, which nevertheless continues pertinacious.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 17 July 1788

    The Convention this moment adjourned, and I am writing in their chamber. A question being about to be put on the mode of adoption (which you have seen), we moved that the House adjourn for a month or two.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 21 September 1788

    I am not sure that the new government will be found to rest on principles sufficiently stable to produce a uniform adherence to what justice, dignity, and liberal policy may require

  • John Jay letter to Pierce.

    New York, NY - 3 January 1789

    It is as yet exceedingly uncertain who will be senators for this State, and consequently it cannot be even conjectured by what leading motives they will probably be influenced in their appointments.

  • John Jay letter to Charles Pettit.

    New York, NY - 14 July 1789

    You know it is important that confidence and cordiality subsist between the heads of the departments, that they may, when necessary, unite their efforts to promote their respective operations for the public good.

  • John Jay letter to Fisher Ames.

    New York, NY - 27 November 1789

    Mr. Sedgwick has given me the same character of Mr. Tucker that you do. There are at present several candidates for the place in question

  • John Jay letter to John Dumont.

    New York, NY - 27 February 1790

    As to offices in the gift of other departments, I think it my duty not to interfere, nor to ask favours, it being improper for a judge to put himself under such obligations.

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    Boston, MA - 28 November 1790

    An individual remarked, that while Congress thought themselves authorized to take such liberties, private property could not be secure in a national bank.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 23 September 1791

    How far the present fiscal arrangements require amendments or additions, can best be ascertained of the secretary.

  • John Jay letter to Frederick Jay.

    Hartford, CT - 2 November 1791

    A person who says he left New-York last Friday, reports that a putrid disorder prevailed there, and that among many others, it had rendered your house a house of mourning. This unexpected event affects me greatly.

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    New York, NY - 8 September 1792

    No strong declarations should be made, unless there be ability and disposition to follow them with strong measures.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Madrid, ESP - 13 October 1792

    I have received your festina Jente letter, but wish it had been at least partly in cipher ; you need not be informed of my reasons for the wish, as by this time you must know that seals are, on this side of the water, rather matters of decoration

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    New York, NY - 19 December 1792

    It is not difficult to perceive that your situation is unpleasant, and it is easy to predict that your enemies will endeavour to render it still more so.

  • John Jay letter to Egbert Benson.

    New York, NY - 31 March 1793

    I have had the pleasure of seeing Senor Ceracchi, and his model of a monument in honour of the revolution. The design appears to me to be a noble one, worthy the attention of the United States

  • John Jay letter to Dugald Stewart.

    New York, NY - 20 March 1794

    Accept my thanks for the ingenious work which you was so obliging as to send me by Mr. Childs. I have read it with pleasure and improvement: it casts new light on several interesting questions

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 30 April 1794

    Life is uncertain - whether I take your letter with me, or leave it here, it would, in case of my death, be inspected by others, who, however virtuous, might be indiscreet.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 23 June 1794

    The observations I have hitherto made induce me to believe that the war with France is popular, and that a war with us would be unpopular.

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    London, ENG - 11 July 1794

    I am still unable to say any thing decisive relative to the objects of my mission. Appearances continue to be singularly favourable, but appearances merit only a certain degree of circumspect reliance.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 21 July 1794

    Among my letters to Mr. Randolph, is one stating an agreement between Lord Grenville and myself for preserving things in a pacific and unaltered state, between us and the British on the side of Canada and the frontiers

  • John Jay letter to John Anstey.

    Pall Mall, ENG - 23 July 1794

    I regret my not knowing that you resided at Bath. We passed from Falmouth through that city in our way to this. It would have given me pleasure to have called upon you, and (to use an Indian expression) have brightened the chain.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 5 August 1794

    I am this moment returned from a long conference with Lord Grenville. Our prospects become more and more promising as we advance in the business.

  • John Jay letter to Hobart.

    London, ENG - 12 August 1794

    The Agricultural Society is incorporated, with a yearly allowance, by government, of three thousand pounds. Their plans are extensive ; they have been singularly industrious, and much has been done.

  • John Jay letter to Read.

    London, ENG - 14 August 1794

    We have both heard it asserted that a man's character may be discerned from his handwriting ; if that be true, you and our friend, Edward Rutledge, must be as enigmatical and unintelligible as Oliver Cromwell

  • John Jay letter to N Cruger.

    London, ENG - 11 September 1794

    I must go without a fortune for want of knowing how to get one. That, my good friend, is not your case ; having already made one fortune, you certainly know better how to make another than a person who has never made any.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 13 September 1794

    The Secretary's letter by Mr. Monroe, and the speech of the latter to the Convention, are printed; and have caused a disagreeable sensation in the public mind here, and probably in that of the Government.

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    London, ENG - 17 September 1794

    The secretary's letters by Mr. Monroe, and his speech on his introduction to the Convention, have appeared in the English papers. Their impression in this country may easily be conjectured. I wish they had both been more guarded.

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    London, ENG - 17 September 1794

    There is something very pleasant in the reflection, that while war, discord, and oppression triumph in so many parts of Europe, their domination does not extend to our country.

  • John Jay letter to Oliver Ellsworth.

    London, ENG - 19 November 1794

    The negotiation is terminated by a treaty. It will, with this letter, go by the packet, which, in expectation of this event, has been detained above a week.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 19 November 1794

    I am exceedingly anxious to return ; for although I have every other reason to be satisfied with my situation, yet I am not at home. I ought not to conceal from you, that the confidence reposed in your personal character was visible and useful throug

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    London, ENG - 19 November 1794

    My task is done ; whether finis coronat opus, the president, senate, and public will decide.

  • John Jay letter to Rufus King.

    London, ENG - 19 November 1794

    I send by the packet the fruit of my negotiation - a treaty. I wish that I could go with it, as well that I might again be in my own country, as that I might answer questions on the subject.

  • John Jay letter to Tench Coxe.

    London, ENG - 18 December 1794

    Our affairs relative to this country have a promising aspect. The best disposition towards us prevails here, and the indications and proofs of it daily increase.

  • John Jay letter to David Hartley.

    London, ENG - 8 January 1795

    It does not appear probable to me that Europe is very speedily to be blessed with a general and lasting peace, or that the period has already arrived when reason and virtue will govern the conduct of the mass of mankind.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 25 February 1795

    The objects and efforts of the Jacobin societies in America were well known here ; and the fate of our government was considered as being involved in that of the insurrection.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 6 March 1795

    it is my opinion that the common and popular (not official) language of America, relative to Great Britain, manifested such a disposition as to create serious apprehensions in this country that we should join with the French in the war

  • John Jay letter to James Anderson.

    London, ENG - 18 March 1795

    I have been favoured with yours of the 14th instant. It gives me pleasure to observe, that good-will towards America seems to prevail generally in this kingdom

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 29 June 1795

    The enclosed contains my resignation of the office of chief-justice. I cannot quit it without again expressing to you my acknowledgments for the honour you conferred upon me by that appointment

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 14 December 1795

    all my accounts agree in representing the public mind as becoming more and more composed, and that certain virulent publications have caused great and general indignation

  • John Jay letter to Robert Goodloe.

    New York, NY - 19 January 1796

    I am much obliged to you, sir, for this vindication ; but it being summary and in general terms, and comprehending only one of the points, I think it best, in order to obviate all further questions, to state particularly my sentiments relative to the

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 26 January 1796

    For the debts, it seems to me best to take some sensible merchant, north of the Potomac, and particularly of Philadelphia, if one of acknowledged weight and character could be found willing to serve.

  • John Jay letter to Uzal Ogden.

    New York, NY - 14 February 1796

    I am much obliged to you for the books you have been so kind as to send me, and which, with your friendly letter of the 11th inst., were delivered to me yesterday.

  • John Jay letter to Lowell.

    New York, NY - 29 February 1796

    Considering the nature of our governments, a succession of demagogues must be expected : and the strenuous efforts of the wise and virtuous will not cease to be necessary to frustrate their artifices and designs.

  • John Jay letter to Grenville.

    New York, NY - 1 May 1796

    The great questions which have agitated this country since my arrival, may now, I think, be considered as determined. I will therefore no longer postpone thanking your lordship

  • John Jay letter to Br Thatcher.

    New York, NY - 26 May 1796

    I shall always be happy in opportunities of manifesting to the family of the late Governor Hancock, my respect for his memory.

  • John Jay letter to William Vaughan.

    New York, NY - 26 May 1796

    As to political reformations in Europe or elsewhere, I confess that, considering men as being what they are, I do not amuse myself with dreams about an age of reason, prior to the millennium

  • John Jay letter to George Hammond.

    New York, NY - 15 June 1796

    I thank you for making to Lord Grenville the intimation I requested relative to the intended present. I shall deem myself sufficiently honoured and gratified, if my endeavours should prove conducive to permanent peace and conciliation between our cou

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 3 September 1796

    The article in the treaty, to which you allude, viz. the last, was proposed by me to Lord Grenville, because it seemed probable that when the treaty should for some time have been in operation, defects might become manifest

  • John Jay letter to John Trumbull.

    New York, NY - 20 October 1796

    You are now placed, as you well observe, in a situation delicate and important. Your reflections on it are just and proper.

  • John Jay letter to Morse.

    Albany, NY - 28 February 1797

    It gives me pleasure to learn, that you will endeavour at least to prepare for a history of the American revolution. To obtain competent and exact information on the subject is not the least arduous part of the task

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Rush.

    Albany, NY - 22 March 1797

    I have received and read with pleasure your elegant eulogium on the late Mr. Rittenhouse. Such attentions to worthy characters, cherish and encourage modest merit.

  • John Jay letter to Grenville.

    New York, NY - 4 June 1797

    It will give you satisfaction to know that the letters I have received from Mr. King and Mr. Gore, make honourable mention of the candour and good faith of your government.

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Vaughan.

    New York, NY - 31 August 1797

    I had this afternoon the pleasure of receiving your favour of the 18th inst. Mrs. Jay joins me in sincerely congratulating you and your amiable family on your arrival in this country ; may your expectations of happiness in it be fully realized.

  • John Jay letter to John Trumbull.

    Albany, NY - 27 October 1797

    The delays of the court of admiralty do not surprise me. I have no faith in any British court of admiralty, though I have the greatest respect for, and the highest confidence in their courts of justice

  • John Jay letter to Timothy Pickering.

    Albany, NY - 13 November 1797

    The recent explosion at Paris has cast most of our calculations and conjectures, relative to the issue of our negotiations with the Directory, very much into the air.

  • John Jay letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    Albany, NY - 30 August 1798

    There are several topics on which I wish to converse with you, and particularly respecting military arrangements at New-York. The rifle corps, and a few of the new light-infantry companies are established.

  • John Jay letter to Morse.

    Albany, NY - 30 January 1799

    But at this period, there certainly are an uncommon number and series of events and circumstances, which assume an aspect unusually portentous. The seeds of trouble are sowing and germinating in our country

  • John Jay letter to Benjamin Goodhue.

    Albany, NY - 29 March 1799

    The expediency of the president's declaration, that he would not send another minister to France, until he should receive assurances, &c, was not, in my judgment, unquestionable. There are political considerations against it

  • John Jay letter to William Wilberforce.

    Albany, NY - 3 September 1799

    Permit me to congratulate you on the promising aspect of affairs in Europe. England stands high, and while just, no one ought to repine at her prosperity.

  • John Jay letter to Samuel Miller.

    Albany, NY - 28 February 1800

    Accept my thanks for the sermon on the death of General Washington, which you was so obliging as to send me. In my opinion, it abounds in excellent sentiments, well arranged and expressed.

  • John Jay letter to Morse.

    Albany, NY - 24 April 1800

    The late revolution in France does not appear to have dissipated the clouds which veiled from our view the fate of that and other countries. As yet, I see little reason to expect the restoration of the Bourbon family

  • John Jay letter to Theophilus Parsons.

    Albany, NY - 1 July 1800

    The president declared to the Congress that he would never send another legation to Paris, until he received assurances that it would be properly respected.

  • John Jay letter to John Sinclair.

    Albany, NY - 16 December 1800

    They who feel an interest in the honour of this country, cannot fail of being gratified by every mark of respect to the memory of our late president.

  • John Jay letter to John Lathrop.

    Albany, NY - 3 March 1801

    The eighteenth century has been distinguished, as you observe, by great events.

  • John Jay letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Bedford, NY - 25 July 1804

    The philosophic topics of consolation are familiar to you, and we all know from experience how little relief is to be derived from them.

  • John Jay letter to Maria Jay.

    Bedford, NY - 2 November 1804

    Our Heavenly Father has called this child home, and the very best wish that you or I could have formed for him. was, that after a long and virtuous abode bore, he might be where he now is.

  • John Jay letter to John Murray.

    Bedford, NY - 18 October 1805

    I have been favoured with your letter of the 2d ultimo, respecting the African Free-school in the city of New-York. It is, in my opinion, a charitable and useful institution, and well entitled to encouragement and support.

  • John Jay letter to Maria Jay.

    Bedford, NY - 29 December 1805

    Although I am persuaded that these reflections are not new to you, yet my solicitude about whatever may affect your comfort, prompts me to remind you of them.

  • John Jay letter to William Wilberforce.

    Bedford, NY - 11 April 1806

    It appears to me, that every independent state has, as such, a perfect right at all times, whether at war or at peace, to make grants to and treaties with any other independent state

  • John Jay letter to William Beers.

    Bedford, NY - 18 April 1807

    Every modification of sovereignty has its inconveniences - there is a better and a worse in them all, and no other than a relative perfection in any of them.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Bedford, NY - 13 September 1807

    You have the gout, and you extract consolation from it ; this is good moral chymistry. My rheumatism and your gout may perhaps carry us home the farthest way round, but not in an easy chair.

  • John Jay letter to Morris Miller.

    Bedford, NY - 22 May 1809

    The information it conveys cannot fail of being grateful to all who prefer the wise and upright policy which distinguished the administration of Washington, to that which of late has distressed and disgraced our country.

  • John Jay letter to Richard Peters.

    Bedford, NY - 24 July 1809

    I was called to Albany by the death of the only remaining child of my daughter, whose grief for the loss of her son and of her husband was still fresh and severe.

  • John Jay letter to Morse.

    Bedford, NY - 16 August 1809

    A proper history of the United States would have much to recommend it : in some respects it would be singular, or unlike all others

  • John Jay letter to William Wilberforce.

    Bedford, NY - 8 November 1809

    The patrons of the abolition act, and of the African Institution, certainly do honour, and will probably do more than ordinary good to Great Britain

  • John Jay letter to Richard Peters.

    Bedford, NY - 26 February 1810

    After lingering through the summer, I found my disorder gradually returning in the autumn. Since the middle of November I have been confined to the house ; but have as yet suffered less this winter than I did the last.

  • John Jay letter to William Wilberforce.

    Bedford, NY - 25 October 1810

    The principles of the English constitution appear to require that the whole number of representatives should be fairly apportioned among the whole number of electors.

  • John Jay letter to Richard Peters.

    Bedford, NY - 0 January 1811

    To sow wheat here is like taking a ticket in a lottery ; more blanks than prizes. The fly destroys more than we reap.

  • John Jay letter to Richard Peters.

    Bedford, NY - 29 March 1811

    Your letter conveyed to me the first and only information I have received, that a copy of President Washington's valedictory address had been found among the papers of General Hamilton, and in his handwriting

  • John Jay letter to John Bristed.

    Bedford, NY - 23 April 1811

    Accept my thanks for the book on the Resources of Great Britain, which you was so obliging as to send me. It abounds in interesting matter

  • John Jay letter to William Miller.

    Bedford, NY - 7 November 1811

    You have certainly had no inconsiderable share of difficulties, dangers, and troubles, and as you justly observe, Providence has carried you through them all, and has also given you consolations and enjoyments.

  • John Jay letter to Peter Munro.

    Bedford, NY - 2 March 1812

    When a piece of ground is wanted for a use important to the State, I know that the State has a right to take it from the owner, on paying the full value of it ; but certainly the Legislature has no right to compel a freeholder to part with his land t

  • John Jay letter to Richard Lee.

    Bedford, NY - 7 September 1812

    mention is made of a work of your brother, then in the press, viz. "Memoirs of the War in the Southern Department." The subject and the author naturally excited my attention, and my desire to procure a copy.

  • John Jay letter to Calvin Chapin.

    Bedford, NY - 2 December 1812

    Such institutions become the religion we profess, and the blessings we enjoy. Be pleased to assure the board that I am very sensible of the honour they have done me

  • John Jay letter to Morse.

    Bedford, NY - 1 January 1813

    Whether our religion permits Christians to vote for infidel rulers, is a question which merits more consideration than it seems yet to have generally received, either from the clergy or the laity.

  • John Jay letter to Jeremiah Evarts.

    Bedford, NY - 12 January 1813

    Notwithstanding the inducements I have to make frequent visits to New-York, I have not been there for four years past. The state of my health, and the regimen it requires, not permitting me to be far or long from home.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Bedford, NY - 22 February 1813

    You request me to be one of the godfathers. Baptism is too generally regarded as being little more than a customary ceremony ; and yet the purpose of it, and the names used on the occasion, show it to be a solemn procedure.

  • John Jay letter to Joseph Mckean.

    Bedford, NY - 14 April 1813

    Marks of respect to the characters of such men as Dr. Elliot, not only tend to console their afflicted relatives, but also to cherish the virtues by which they were distinguished.

  • John Jay letter to Noah Webster.

    Bedford, NY - 31 May 1813

    The literary productions of Britain and America being interesting to each other, many are of opinion, and I concur in it, that the English language and its orthography should be the same in both countries.

  • John Jay letter to Morse.

    Bedford, NY - 25 October 1813

    I have chosen for this letter a subject that is more within your province than in mine.

  • John Jay letter to William Miller.

    Bedford, NY - 20 September 1814

    The cold weather you mention has also prevailed here. I do not recollect so cool a summer. Our corn does not look well. The crops of rye were slender ; those of wheat were good.

  • John Jay letter to Timothy Pickering.

    Bedford, NY - 1 November 1814

    Every independent nation has, as such, a rightful and exclusive jurisdiction over the country within its acknowledged boundary lines.

  • John Jay letter to Richard Peters.

    Bedford, NY - 9 January 1815

    My health continues to wear away, but I seldom suffer severe pain. Conversation, books, and recollections still enable me, with the blessing of Providence, to amuse confinement, and to glide on placidly towards that ocean to which the stream of time

  • John Jay letter to Richard Peters.

    Bedford, NY - 11 March 1815

    Unless discontents should arise between France and Britain, French influence will not soon be very active in America ; and, consequently, will not administer much fuel to renew and feed a flame against England.

  • John Jay letter to Morse.

    Bedford, NY - 14 February 1816

    As to the work you mention, I am glad you have undertaken it, because it is desirable, and because I expect it will be well performed. It would give me pleasure to afford the aids you request, but the state of my health admits of very little exertion

  • John Jay letter to John Mason.

    Bedford, NY - 22 May 1816

    Accept my thanks for the friendly letter, and for the book which you was so obliging as to send me by my son.

  • John Jay letter to Romeyn.

    Bedford, NY - 12 June 1816

    I rejoice in the institution of that national society, and assure the Board of Managers, that I am very sensible of the honour they have done me, in thus connecting me with it.

  • John Jay letter to John Sinclair.

    Bedford, NY - 8 August 1816

    Your exertions to improve agriculture, and render it more productive, are known and acknowledged.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Bedford, NY - 0 October 1816

    Having heard much of your discourse before the New-York Historical Society, it gave me pleasure to receieve copy of it, and to find from the direction that I owed it to your friendly attention.

  • John Jay letter to John Murray.

    Bedford, NY - 12 October 1816

    Whether war of every description is prohibited by the gospel, is one of those questions on which the excitement of any of the passions can produce no light. An answer to it can result only from careful investigation and fair reasoning.

  • John Jay letter to John Adams.

    Bedford, NY - 31 January 1818

    I have not seen Mr. Wirt's book, nor heard of the "passage" in it, of which your letter contains a copy.

  • John Jay letter to John Murray.

    Bedford, NY - 15 April 1818

    In my letter to you of the 16th October Inst, I hinted that I might perhaps write and send you a few more lines on the question, Whether war of every description is forbidden by the gospel ?

  • John Jay letter to Richard Peters.

    Bedford, NY - 25 January 1819

    As you are in the seventy-fifth year of your age, and I in the seventy- fourth of mine, our leases have expired. We are holding over, and others will soon occupy our places.

  • John Jay letter to John Murray.

    Bedford, NY - 27 February 1819

    The lawfulness of the invasion and conquest of Canaan, being made by express Divine command, is indubitable. It does not decide the question, whether any wars, unless so commanded, are permitted by the moral law

  • John Jay letter to Daniel Raymond.

    Bedford, NY - 21 December 1819

    The remarks and statements contained in it place the pernicious influence of slavery on the welfare of our country in conspicuous and impressive points of view.

  • John Jay letter to Richard Peters.

    Bedford, NY - 26 December 1820

    Men who are ardent in the pursuit of influence and its fruits, and more attentive to the prosecution than to the propriety of their schemes, usually become and remain hostile to those who steadfastly disapprove of their manoeuvres.

  • John Jay letter to George Otis.

    Bedford, NY - 13 January 1821

    I have received your letter of the 23d ult. expressing a desire that Botta's History and your Translation of it may have my approbation

  • John Jay letter to Richard Peters.

    Bedford, NY - 12 March 1821

    My letter to you of the 20th December last, contained some remarks relative to the perversions and obliquities which you had noticed, and which I observed were neither recent nor unexpected.

  • John Jay letter to Lindley Murray.

    Bedford, NY - 24 April 1821

    We have both experienced afflicting dispensations. Your portion of health has for a long time been diminished ; and I have not had a well day for the last twelve years.

  • John Jay letter to E Brown.

    Bedford, NY - 30 April 1821

    Controversies between the national and a state government, or any of their respective departments, are to be regretted. It is desirable that the one which occasioned this report, should be brought to an amicable and satisfactory termination

  • John Jay letter to Noah Webster.

    Bedford, NY - 3 December 1821

    Your Dictionary will doubtless derive utility and reputation from the extensive investigations you mention. The assiduity with which you have for many years persevered, and still persevere, in accomplishing that arduous task, will, I hope, be followe

  • John Jay letter to Edward Livingston.

    Bedford, NY - 28 July 1822

    That the government of a State should have authority to appoint "particular days for rendering thanks to God" for any signal blessing, or imploring his assistance "in any public calamity," is certainly proper.

  • John Jay letter to Peter Van Schaack.

    Bedford, NY - 23 January 1827

    A kind Providence has extended our lives to the commencement of another year. Very few of our early a ciates remain with us.