John C. Calhoun Letters for the years 1814 thru 1850

John C. Calhoun

John C. Calhoun wrote 300 Letters from a total of 15 locations including Washington, MD, Wilmington, SC, and War Department, MD. John C. Calhoun wrote a total of 25 people including Thomas Clemson, and James Edward Calhoun. Most of John C. Calhoun's letters were written in the year 1846. Several other letters were written in 1847 and 1848. Who did John C. Calhoun know? View John C. Calhoun's social graph.

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  • John Calhoun letter to Patrick Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 4 January 1814

    I think the price of cotton will again rise. There is no doubt of a great failure on the Mississippi.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 26 February 1815

    As to your future course; my advice would be not to continue in the army during peace, but I would not resign. The probability is that the military establishment will be much reduced

  • John Calhoun letter to Floride Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 29 November 1815

    The more I reflect on it, I am the better satisfied you ought to go to Charleston at the time of your labour.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Wilmington, SC - 1 November 1817

    I am impressed with the importance of the trust which you have tendered to me

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    War Department, MD - 20 December 1817

    I find that living here will be much more expensive than what I expected. I am but temporarily fixed yet, with Mr. Lowndes

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    War Department, MD - 13 January 1818

    I have examined the case of Mr. Poirey; and find that the report of Mr. McHenry (which I transmit) contains all of the information in relation to it

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    War Department, MD - 22 August 1818

    as I cannot postpone any longer the proposals for supplying the troops the next year, they will be issued immediately.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Jackson.

    War Department, MD - 22 August 1818

    it is possible that you may not have received a copy of the instruction to Genl. Smith, in relation to the contemplated post at the mouth of the Yellow stone river.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    War Department, MD - 29 August 1818

    Mr. Adams left here yesterday; and requested me to open and read the dispatches from abroad; and to forward to you such as might have any interest.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    War Department, MD - 6 September 1818

    Agreeably to your suggestion, I will direct the Commissioner appointed to run out the lines under the late treaty with the Creeks

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    War Department, MD - 19 September 1818

    I enclose for your approval regulations for the Medical Department. They have been drawn up with care; and I believe are as good as can be devised for the commencement of the system.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Jackson.

    War Department, MD - 28 December 1818

    Experience has proved, that the opinion which you had formed of the movements of the Spaniards on our South western frontier, is correct.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Jackson.

    War Department, MD - 5 January 1819

    In order to meet Indian hostilities the boat will be prepared with strong bulwarks and will want a few light pieces on her deck.

  • John Calhoun letter to Winfield Scott.

    War Department, MD - 5 March 1819

    I have laid your statement before the President in order to take his direction in relation to it

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Jackson.

    War Department, MD - 6 March 1819

    You are already informed of the motives of the President and of the arrangements which have been made to occupy in force the contemplated posts on the Missouri.

  • John Calhoun letter to Winfield Scott.

    War Department, MD - 11 March 1819

    The President concurs with me in opinion that any relaxation of the order of the 21st February 1818, as it relates to the correspondence between yourself and Genl. Jackson, would be improper.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Jackson.

    War Department, MD - 10 August 1819

    You will perceive on reading the report, that in many particulars the orders and regulations of the Department have not been complied with.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    War Department, MD - 14 September 1819

    It was impossible to make a station for the collectorship at Charleston, which would not have given offence to the rival candidates and their friends.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Quincy Adams.

    War Department, MD - 22 December 1819

    This Department has no certain information in relation to the number of Spanish Troops in Florida; but it is believed that it does not exceed 800.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Jackson.

    War Department, MD - 24 December 1819

    Before my return to the City the President had directed preparatory arrangements for the military occupation of the Floridas if such should be the pleasure of Congress

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Jackson.

    War Department, MD - 31 December 1819

    In the event of Congress authorizing the occupation of Florida every necessary preparation originating at the subordinate offices of this Department will be made in time, and ample funds will be transmitted

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Jackson.

    War Department, MD - 15 March 1820

    In this state of uncertainty the President is of the opinion, that it would be improper to take any military measure now

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    War Department, MD - 23 March 1820

    We have had the misfortune to loose our your youngest child. She died last night at 10 o'clock after a most painful illness of 16 days, the last ten of which we had but little hope of her living.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    War Department, MD - 7 May 1820

    Your mother is residing with us and appears to be very well satisfied. She will not return to Carolina this summer; and I hope she will make up her mind to take up her permanent residence with us.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    War Department, MD - 14 July 1820

    Mrs Calhoun and myself are much obliged to you for your kind suggestion and offer in relation to the springs near your residence in London.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    War Department, MD - 23 October 1820

    Setting jesting aside, I am glad, that you offered for the legislature; and hope sincerely, that you have succeeded

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    War Department, MD - 26 November 1820

    I have received the money paid to Dr. Simonds; and I hope that your collection will enable you to make me a farther remittance.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    War Department, MD - 8 January 1821

    I know of but few instances of sickness among the residents; among them however is your mother.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Jackson.

    War Department, MD - 22 March 1821

    To execute the instructions which you have received, through the Department of State to take possession of East and West Florida, you will proceed with as little delay as may be practicable

  • John Calhoun letter to Timothy Pickering.

    Washington, MD - 29 March 1821

    On the defence of the eastern portion of our northern frontier, I substantially concur, with the exception of works to command lake Champlain.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 6 May 1821

    Our last arrival from Europe has brought us important intelligence. We may not only hope, but have some confidence, that the allied powers will be baffled.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    War Department, MD - 13 May 1821

    We have had very late news, from Europe. The Neapolitans have acted most cowardly. They yielded all without resistance.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    War Department, MD - 18 June 1821

    The truth appears to be, that the Officers of the Army, at the end of the War, had a very erroneous mode of thinking, as well on this, as many other points, which took some years to correct.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    War Department, MD - 20 July 1821

    I enclose for your consideration, and direction in relation to it, a letter from Gen'l. Scott

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    War Department, MD - 18 August 1821

    Col Gadsden having accepted the office of Adjutant-General it has become -necessary to select some one to fill the place, which he occupied.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 27 September 1821

    The sickness is not peculiar to this place, but spreads with little exception over the whole country quite into the Mountains.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    War Department, MD - 28 September 1821

    The condition of the Seminole Indians in Florida is such as to require the immediate attention of Government.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    War Department, MD - 14 October 1821

    You will perceive, on the perusal, that the subject involves the extent of the military powers of the Governor of Florida, and is one of some delicacy.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 16 January 1822

    We congratulate you most sincerely on the birth of your son, and hope that you may enjoy all of the anticipated happiness that such an event is calculated to inspire.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 19 March 1822

    You have not informed us of your marriage, but we have learned by letters from Charleston that the event has taken place. I congratulate you most sincerely on the occasion.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 14 May 1822

    You will call us very fickle when I inform you that we have declined our journey to the South.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 1 July 1822

    I have received Your favour of the 17th June and am very happy to hear that You have so flattering a prospect as to your corn and cotton crop.

  • John Calhoun letter to Nicholas Biddle.

    Washington, MD - 2 December 1822

    Feeling as I do deep solicitude in the prosperity of the Bank, I have been very much gratified with your nomination

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 14 April 1823

    Your Mother has no objection to Mr Huger occupying her house. He would be an acquisition to your neighbourhood, which with so many agreeable additions must be very pleasant.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 27 May 1823

    On the 19th ins't, we had the addition of a fine boy to our family. I would have informed you earlier of so agreeable an event, but was indisposed at the time with a slight fever

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 24 August 1823

    I wrote to Gov'r Cass and requested him to advance you $200 should [you] require that sum.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 28 September 1823

    By the last arrival cotton was a little depressed, but I have no doubt, that it was merely temporary. The consumption is enormous; not less in Great Britain alone than 500,000 bales

  • John Calhoun letter to Virgil Maxcy.

    Washington, MD - 11 December 1823

    We were deeply afflicted with your loss. It is the most trying of all dispensations.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 30 January 1824

    We deeply deplore your loss, and sympathize with you in your affliction. The loss is irreparable, and time alone can apply an assuaging hand. He is the only healer of such deep afflictions.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 11 September 1824

    I was much gratified with my visit to the summit of the Allegaheny. It is a region of singular formation, and the prospect is fair, that there will be an ample supply of water for the great national work in contemplation.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    York Town, PA - 20 October 1824

    On his part, Gen'l. La Fayette acquitted himself remarkable well. His replies were all appropriate, and his toasts, tho' evidently unpremediated, were such as to strike forcibly.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Richmond, VA - 28 October 1824

    I entirely accord in the view, which you have taken on the question, whether I should continue with Gen'l. La Fayette till his arrival in Albemarle.

  • John Calhoun letter to Floride Bonneau Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 12 November 1824

    We are all well. Patrick had the scarlet fever while I was absent, but is now quite hearty. John is still a little pale and feeble, but has a good appetite, and is gradually getting stout.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 20 February 1825

    The expidition will not proceed this year. I brought the subject before the Cabinet at the commencement of the session; but the opinion was, that it could not be conducted as it ought to be without the consent of the Mexican government

  • John Calhoun letter to James Madison.

    War Department, MD - 25 February 1825

    Mr Owen, the bearer is desirous of forming the acquaintance of one, so distinguished by the affection and esteem of his fellow citizens as yourself.

  • John Calhoun letter to Floride Bonneau Calhoun.

    Georgetown - 28 May 1826

    We never had in the same time as much sickness. All of the children, except James, have had very severe colds with coughs accompanied by fever in every instance but Andrew.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 14 June 1826

    I must request the favour of you, preparatory to our return, to have Clergy Hall repaired, so as to answer for a temporary residence.

  • John Calhoun letter to Floride Bonneau Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 14 June 1826

    It is my intention to fix permanently in Pendleton, and to commence building immediately on my return, if an exchange can be had with Col Lewis.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 24 December 1826

    I have read with great interest your observations and reflections on the state of things in Brazil. It is a most important section of our Continent

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 15 January 1827

    I am sorry to learn from your sister, that the negroes at Clergy Hall have been in some instances disorderly. She feels quite uneasy about it.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 31 January 1827

    I was glad to receive so full an account of my business as you gave me in your last; but regret that the plantation business seemed to go on so badly after I left home.

  • John Calhoun letter to Virgil Maxcy.

    Washington, MD - 12 February 1827

    You mention nothing of my last letter in answer to your former, and I fear you may not have received it.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 30 February 1827

    The letter of the 9th September 1818 is doubtless the one, to which my informant refers; and I am only surprised, how the letter could have passed out of my possession, and how any one could perceive the least mystery in it

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Pendleton, SC - 26 August 1827

    The political world has assumed a very boisterous appearance, which at the approaching session, will probably work up into a storm. I never have seen such abundant elements of discord

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 9 December 1827

    Knowing your aversion to being involved, in any degree, in the political discussions of the day, I regret exceedingly to be compelled by a regard to my character to request you to furnish me with a statement of the facts connected with my appointment

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 9 December 1827

    Nothing but necessity has compelled me to break in on your retirement, by making the request contained in the enclosed communication.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 22 December 1827

    me. Within the last few days, I accidentally heard of a letter, which I suppose to be the same, with such circumstances, as leave me no doubt where it is.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 3 January 1828

    I have received your letters with the enclosed correspondence, which I find agrees with the list of letters attached, and which obviously forms a chain, that contains the whole correspondence on the occasion.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 23 January 1828

    I am here without my family. The inconvenience of bringing a large family so far is so great as to deter your sister from the undertaking.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 7 March 1828

    The letter, that has been the subject of our correspondence, proves. to be, as we had supposed it would, the one of the 9th Sept, 1818

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 0 April 1828

    It stricks me, that I cannot with propriety discuss the subject of the orders with Maj'r. Lee, tho I would have no objection to enter fully into it in a correspondence with General Jackson

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 1 May 1828

    Through out the whole of this affair, I have felt the greatest solicitude, that the arts which have been adopted to cause a rupture between yourself and Gen'l. Jackson, should not succeed.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 4 May 1828

    Never was there such universal, and severe pressure on the whole South excepting the portion, which plants sugar. Our staples hardly return the expense of cultivation

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Pendleton, SC - 10 July 1828

    I have received a letter from Gen'l. Jackson, in which he makes the following remarks

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 7 August 1828

    Knowing your negligent habit as a correspondent, we were fearful, that we should not hear from you till your return.

  • John Calhoun letter to Patrick Noble.

    Washington, MD - 10 January 1829

    In relation to the tariff, I think there is a lowering of tone on the part of the Tariff states

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 0 October 1830

    I enclose a letter and packet, which I received by the last mail for you; and also several news papers containing accounts of the last intelligence from France.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 0 January 1831

    I was much gratified to hear from you; and to learn, after so many arrangements, you were fixed so much to your satisfaction, and had recommenced your studies with so much sperit.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 11 January 1831

    It is with unfeigned regret, that I am again constrained to trouble you on any subject that relates to myself

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 13 January 1831

    Mr Crawford's correspondence with Mr Adams and Mr Crowninshield placed the opponents of the administration in possession of the knowledge of the correspondence between us, and their policy has been to force it out.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 27 January 1831

    I am much obliged to you for your suggestions, as to the shape that ought to be given to my call on you.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 27 January 1831

    It is with extreme regret, that I intrude on your retirement, but events have occurred, since the date of my letter to you last Spring

  • John Calhoun letter to John Quincy Adams.

    Washington, MD - 29 January 1831

    I deem it important, as a means of vindicating my character against an attack on my course in the deliberations of the Cabinet on the Seminole affair, to obtain a statement of Mr Crawford's course on the same occasion

  • John Calhoun letter to John Quincy Adams.

    Washington, MD - 3 February 1831

    will proceed to state the point mainly at issue between Mr Crawford and myself, relative to what occurred in the deliberation of the Cabinet on the Seminole question

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 4 February 1831

    I find mine to which your's is an answer by being too concisely expressed in the part that refers to my course towards Gen'l. Jackson has lead you very naturally into an error, as to the information I desired.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Monroe.

    Washington, MD - 16 February 1831

    I have been compelled very reluctantly to place before the publick my correspondence with Gen'l. Jackson on my course in the Cabinet, on the Seminole subject.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 27 August 1831

    The heavy rains and great rise in the Water courses must of course make you solicitous to hear about your planting interest in this quarter.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 10 September 1831

    Your letter gave me the first information of the extent of my loss at Bath. That added to my loss here, which is literally everything, except about 50 acres of cotton, renders it a calamitous year to me.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 16 November 1831

    Should the administration be decidedly beaten in the State Van Buren will be compelled to retire and the administration, as a party, will dissolve, which would change the whole aspect of the political horizon

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 25 December 1831

    The weather has been exceedingly severe, more so than I have ever known both for the intensity and duration of the cold.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 30 December 1831

    I do not know, that I ought to censure you for your aversion to writing, as I believe it is in some degree hereditary

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 13 February 1832

    I am much gratified to learn, that you are so well pleased with the institution and your situation. The change of your room mate must add to the agreeableness of your situation.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 26 February 1832

    I will without delay attend to the Bank dividend; and, when obtained, will dispose of your share, as you desire. You have taken the true view of our agriculture.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 10 March 1832

    With your great aversion to early rising, you deserve much praise for not having in any instance "missed prayers"; and, I do hope, that your anticipation, that habit will make it agreeable to you, will prove correct.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 28 April 1832

    I am pleased to see you so earnestly engaged in planting, and so desirous of improving our agriculture. It is the first of pursuits

  • John Calhoun letter to Patrick Noble.

    Fort Hill, SC - 8 November 1832

    I foresee a good deal of agitation ahead in relation to the rail road, I which must distract and divide the State, unless there should be much prudence, and good management on the part of the Legislature.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 10 January 1833

    Our cause is doing well. Let our people go on; be firm and prudent; give no pretex for force, and I feel confident of a peacable and glorious triumph for our cause and the state.

  • John Calhoun letter to Francis Pickens.

    Washington, MD - 12 December 1833

    I find that we are a good deal stronger in the House of Representatives both in numbers, and in sperit and Union, than what we were at the last session.

  • John Calhoun letter to Francis Pickens.

    Washington, MD -

    I see the court has decided against us; and the grave question is now presented what shall be done ?

  • John Calhoun letter to Francis Pickens.

    Senate Chamber, MD - 4 January 1834

    I received your letter this morning, and have conversed with Mr. McDuffie in relation to its contents.

  • John Calhoun letter to Francis Pickens.

    Washington, MD - 20 January 1834

    I took the liberty of showing it to Mr. McDuffie, as it appeared to me to be due to him that he should be apprised of its contents.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Ewing Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 30 January 1834

    Your sister writes, that Mr Davis has ceased to work on my mill and Gin, and that neither of them are going. It is too bad. I fear that he will never finish unless he is perpetually urged.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 8 February 1834

    I fear there is no hope of the impeachment; but that which you will think the next best event, the overthrow of Jacksonism, is certain; and with it, Van Buren and his party.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 16 February 1834

    Our cause is growing daily. The deposit question is still before us and its fate uncertain.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 26 March 1834

    You will find my speech on Mr Webster's motion in tomorrows Telegraph.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 3 April 1834

    You cannot imagine how much I am gratified to learn, that you bestow so much of your time and attention, and with so much success on your little scholars.

  • John Calhoun letter to Francis Pickens.

    Washington, MD - 15 April 1834

    I am gratified to learn, that my remarks on the currency has been so well received both by you and our other friends in Carolina.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 14 May 1834

    Were it not for your letters, there are a thousand incidents that are daily occurring, where every incident, even the smallest, is interesting to me, of which I should remain ignorant.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 21 May 1834

    Nothing, I think, will be done as to the currency this session. The administration is going down faster, than it ever rose.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 20 September 1834

    Every body is for strict construction; Mr Webster, Mr Ritchie and all; but in fact, it will ever be found to be the construction of the permanent minority against the permanent majority, and of course of itself valueless.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 30 August 1835

    I am gratified, but not surprised, to learn the change of sentiment to the North in reference to our doctrines.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 23 September 1835

    Unionism is extinct in our state I think.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Washington, MD - 24 January 1836

    I was much gratified with the contents of your letter and hope you may realise your anticipations.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 2 September 1836

    There is a good tone getting up here in reference to the rail road. I cannot doubt of the vast superiority of the route by the Carolina gap.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 19 September 1836

    I have just returned from a laborious examination of the country between this and the mouth of Tuskyseege in company with Col Gadsden.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 11 November 1836

    Among others, I met with Maj'r. Haynes, an intelligent gentleman who resides a few miles below Kingston, and who had come on to take a contract on the Georgia rail road

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Columbia, SC - 9 December 1836

    I have had a pretty full conversation with him on the rail road, and have got him to assent to go to Knoxville, on the condition you will go, as one of the proxies.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD -

    Things are doing well here. Van Buren has been forced by his situation and the terror of Jackson to play directly into our hands and I am determined, that he shall not escape from us.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Abbeville - 22 March 1837

    Van Buren goes in very weak and may be easily crushed with anything like a vigorous effort. There is a great and growing change in our favour.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 12 May 1837

    Our government by its folly and vice has lost all control for good over the banks and the currency.

  • John Calhoun letter to Robert Hunter.

    Fort Hill, SC - 0 June 1837

    I write to say to you how much I am gratified with the success of your election.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 26 June 1837

    It will be impossible to form a definitive opinion, as to the proposed convention, to which you refer, till we see the objects distinctly stated, and the motives, which actuate those who propose it fully developed.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 27 July 1837

    I am distressed to hear of your difficulties with the paper and would do anything in my power, to which I could by any possibility bring my feelings, that would afford relief

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 8 September 1837

    We expected, when I first wrote, to change our lodgings, but Co'l Pickens, and myself both concluded, after looking about, that we could not better ourselves, and have determined to remain with Miss Cocran for the Session.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 30 September 1837

    I was quite refreshed, my dear Anna, with the account you gave me of the Wedding and wedding parties and the gay hours, which you and Maria have spent.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 27 October 1837

    I returned home on the 24th and had the pleasure of finding the sick all on the recovery.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 27 October 1837

    I arrived here day before yesterday after a safe and pleasant journey with the exception of the Dust, which was very troublesome throughout the whole way.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Columbia - 0 December 1837

    I find the resolution of the company is to purchase and complete the Hamburgh road, to unite with the Athens and to unite finally with the Georgia state road

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 20 December 1837

    I took my seat on Monday, and the time of the Senate has ever since been mainly occupied with abolitionism.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 24 December 1837

    The action of our state on the Divorce has made a deep impression out of the state, and will do much to rally the South on our position.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 24 December 1837

    The Vermont resolutions to abolish Slavery in this District and the Territories, to prevent the Sales and transfer of slaves from State to State and against the annexation of Texas are to be presented on the 3d Jan'y

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 0 January 1838

    I enclose you some Siberian spring wheat, which I received a few days since. I would advise the Sowing of it, in our climate, early in March

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 7 February 1838

    The Divorce question is up, and I will have to take a prominent part.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 24 February 1838

    You know it is much more easy to make a speech to the Senate, than to the country. The former may be delivered in two or three hours, but the latter requires several days to prepare

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 5 April 1838

    MY DEAR SON, I am glad to learn by yours of the 23 d April, that you are so deeply impressed with the importance of caution in all your money movements.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 30 April 1839

    I have just received a letter from Anna, which says, that you may possibly be compelled to visit Philadelphia in order to attend to our note in bank, as the pressure on the money market has been so great

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 0 May 1839

    You have in my opinion concluded wisely, in determining- to sell for whatever you can realize.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 5 October 1839

    The death of Gen'l. Hayne and Co'l Blanding are really surprising events, under the circumstances under which they occurred; and are destined to effect a great change in the system

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 2 November 1839

    I am exceedingly desirous to see you placed on solid ground, in these critical times, as to pecuniary affairs. But let me advise you, as a friend, not to think of the step, which you suggest.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 17 November 1839

    I cannot possibly be at Washington before the day proceeding the session. I propose to leave this on the 23 d , taking the route by Charleston

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 7 December 1839

    I hope the negroes arrived shortly after the date of your last, and that they have been sensibly felt in getting out our crop.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 8 December 1839

    Harrison is nominated at Harrisburgh, as the Whig candidate. It will, I think, throw off the Southern division of the party.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 18 December 1839

    My life is quite a contrast to yours. I have much company, but very little society.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 20 December 1839

    The nomination of Harrison will not, I take it, be well received in the South.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Washington, MD - 17 January 1840

    When I took my seat in the Senate this morning, I found on my table your letter of this instant, the contents of which not a little surprised me.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Washington, MD - 18 January 1840

    Were I not apprehensive, that you would misconstrue my motives, I would say to you, that you would make a great mistake to attack personally any one in your vindication.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 25 January 1840

    As far as the consulate at Havannah may bear on your dicision, it is proper to remark, that I regard the contingency as a remote one.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 0 February 1840

    So far from being offended, my dear daughter, the sentiments you have expressed but elevates you, if possible, in my estimation.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 1 February 1840

    The House has refused to receive abolition petitions; the strongest measure yet taken and which must be productive of good consequences.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 12 February 1840

    We are now in the midest of an exciting question, the assumption of state debts.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 14 February 1840

    I send you in pamphlet form my speech on the assumption of the State debts. You will see what bold grounds I took

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 24 March 1840

    I have had a subject on hand of not a little interest to the South; I mean the case of the Enterprise, one of the three Brigs, which have been so long in negotiation

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 29 April 1840

    The Presidential race is going to be a close one. Preston, Thompson, and Dawson have come out boldly, after all their denials, on the side of the bank tariff

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 30 May 1840

    I was distressed to hear through Francis, that your health was not good, and could not but feel somewhat mortified, that you had not mentioned, or hinted at your indisposition, in any of your letters to me

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Senate Chamber, MD - 8 June 1840

    As to the Presidential election, my impression remains unchanged; that Gen'l. Harrison will be defeated, and such, I think, begins to be the prevailing opinion here.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 5 August 1840

    Co'l Pickens has no opponents, but I was surprised to learn, that there is so much Harrisonism in Abbeville.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 10 August 1840

    This state is relatively quiet, though there is a sprinkle of Harrisonism, more or less, all over the state.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 25 September 1840

    Co'l Gadsden is with me, on his return from a meeting at Ashville of the direction of the rail road. Not a sufficient number attended to do business.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 1 November 1840

    We have nothing new. The state has gone with great unanimity against Harrison, though from every appearance he will succeed.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 2 November 1840

    The Whigs are shouting and rejoicing over their brilliant victory, as they call it; but, if I do not greatly mistake, it will prove the cause, among other things, of their speedy and utter overthrow.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 13 December 1840

    The weather has been so bad, that I fear the out door work has been much interrrupted. It is now raining and thawing, with very sloppy streets.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 26 December 1840

    I do not despair, (if we can preserve it,) of defeating the National bank. There will be found great difficulty in getting one.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 0 January 1841

    I am happy to hear, that you think Anna something better. I have been exceedingly uneasy about her

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 3 January 1841

    There is nothing, that concerns you, that is indifferent to me, or in which I would not take more interest, than if it concerned nryself individually.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 17 February 1841

    As the time approaches, the office seekers begin to flock to the city and set seige to Gen'l. Harrison; who I understand is profuse of promises.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 23 February 1841

    The enthusiasm of log Cabin is abating and in its place discord begins to show itself in the ranks of the Whigs.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 10 March 1841

    The debate to day was warm and personal between Mr King of Alabama and Mr Clay of Kentucky, so much so, that it is rumoured, that the latter has challenged the former.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 0 June 1841

    The warm and moist weather must have a powerful effect on the crop, and backward as the cotton was will I hope bring it out.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 28 June 1841

    The very existence of our institutions is at stake. We have brought to the ground the old compactly built system of federal measures; funded debt, national bank, Tariff, and illegal and unconstitutional appropriations.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 11 July 1841

    When I last heard from Alabama, the prospect there was exceedingly fine, both corn and cotton, and what is important, in reference to the corn, very early.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 26 July 1841

    The bank bill is now at the engrossment. We, the Republicans, proposed the question

  • John Calhoun letter to Martin Van Buren.

    Washington, MD - 5 August 1841

    Under such circumstances, I feel it to be a duty, belonging to my domestick and private relations, not to lose a day in my return home

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 8 August 1841

    I hope, that the getting in of my crop will be pushed from the first, so that my hands intended to be sent out, may go as early as possible.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 12 September 1841

    You will have seen ere this reaches you that the fiscal corporation has been vetoed; that the Secretaries of the Treasury, of War and the navy, with the attorney General have resigned

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 18 September 1841

    The fiscal corporation will be taken up to day and will, I think, be sent to the President tomorrow. It will be vetoed.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 1 November 1841

    I am in correspondence with Mr King of Augusta, and Co'l Gadsden on the subject of the road, with some hope of obtaining aid

  • John Calhoun letter to Wilson Lumpkin.

    Washington, MD - 26 December 1841

    You must have been struck with the fact that the session has commenced with great quiet. This results from the state of the parties.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 31 December 1841

    We have not got more than fairly under way. In the Senate we are engaged in the discussion of the Exchequer Scheme presented by the Executive. It fares badly.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 8 April 1843

    I hope you and Maria will not fail to make us a visit during the summer. We shall be glad to see you. It will give you an opportunity to look at your mountain property.

  • John Calhoun letter to Robert Hunter.

    Fort Hill, SC - 0 May 1843

    I hope you do not err in supposing, that Gov'r Van Ness will be appointed collector of N. York.

  • John Calhoun letter to Robert Hunter.

    Fort Hill, SC - 3 June 1843

    The indication every where South of Virginia is favourable. In this state, there is perfect unanimity and much devotion to the cause.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 7 June 1843

    There is, I think, no danger of any state South of North Carolina. That State will be taken either by Mr Clay, or myself

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 6 July 1843

    If I do not mistake, we hold in our hands the means of forcing on the friends of Mr Van Buren in Virginia and N. York the choice of delegates by District and the per capita mode of voting

  • John Calhoun letter to Robert Hunter.

    Fort Hill, SC - 10 July 1843

    I regret, that you could not take the Charge of the Spectator, but doubt not, that you have decided correctly all things considered.

  • John Calhoun letter to Robert Hunter.

    Fort Hill, SC - 6 August 1843

    My impression is and has been, that it would be difficult, if not impossible to get up a general organization. It required the aid of office and patronage for Mr V. B. to effect it

  • John Calhoun letter to Robert Hunter.

    Fort Hill, SC - 26 August 1843

    A member of our State Convention has propounded two questions to Mr Ritchie, which will throw the onus on him.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 8 September 1843

    England has but one alternative; to harmonize her interest with that of the other portions of the civilized world, or resort to force to maintain her pre-eminence.

  • John Calhoun letter to Robert Hunter.

    Fort Hill, SC - 12 September 1843

    I have no doubt, but that the cause to which you refer has a powerful effect in the North and North West; and that it has been secretly used by Van Buren and his friends to weaken me.

  • John Calhoun letter to Robert Hunter.

    Fort Hill, SC - 22 December 1843

    Those who expect to live on the Gov't. have proved stronger than the people, and political machinery stronger than arguments.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 15 January 1844

    I have modified my Address as far as I could consistently with the principles on which I act, to meet the views of my friends.

  • John Calhoun letter to Robert Hunter.

    Fort Hill, SC - 1 February 1844

    Our friends ought by no means [to] give a pledge unless conditional to support the nominee of the Baltimore convention.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 7 February 1844

    I have written to the Editor of the Mercury to correct the statement, that my name was withdrawn by myself.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 10 February 1844

    They entertained the hope (a vain one I am sure) that they could compel the friends of Mr V. B. to redeem their pledges, in reference to the Tariff and Abolition, and were adverse to taking any step, which would lead to a seperation.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 14 February 1844

    The great mass of my friends and supporters, who disagree with the course you are in favor of, still hope, that the party will redeem their pledges, both in reference to the tariff and Abolition

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    State Department, MD - 14 September 1844

    I have been much engaged between the Oregon negotiations, preparing dispatches, and the ordinary duties of the office.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Donelson.

    Washington, MD - 16 September 1844

    The mail of yesterday brought the melancholy intelligence of the death of General Howard, our Charge at Texas

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 7 October 1844

    The friends of Polk now regard his election as about certain. I think the prospect good; but the Whigs are making great efforts

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 12 November 1844

    I arrived here on my return from home day before yesterday, accompanied by Mrs Calhoun, Cornelia, James and Eugenia Calhoun. We had a very pleasant journey, with fine weather all the way.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 13 December 1844

    The great question of the session will be the annexation of Texas. It will be brought up without delay in both Houses and pressed with Zeal by its friends.

  • John Calhoun letter to Robert Hunter.

    Washington, MD - 29 December 1844

    In answer to your enquiry, how the Western Democrats voted on the repeal of the 25th rule, I am sorry to say, that the great body voted for it.

  • John Calhoun letter to John Tyler.

    Washington, MD - 10 February 1845

    whether Mr. Duff Green does now hold, or has lately held any Diplomatic or official station near the Government of Texas

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 26 February 1845

    I have delayed writing to the last day by the Steamer, in the hope, that I should be able to give you information of the fate of the question of annexation of Texas and the formation of the Cabinet.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 11 March 1845

    I leave today for Fort Hill. Yesterday I terminated my official character as Secretary [of] State, and passed the office to Mr Buchanan.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 23 March 1845

    I wrote Anna by the last Steamer, just before I took my departure from Washington; and informed her, that on my return, I would visit the Cane Brake and write you, as to the State of your affairs there.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 25 April 1845

    Since then, the most important, is the dismissal of Blair and the Globe, and the adoption of Ritchie and a new paper to be published by him, as the organ of the administration.

  • John Calhoun letter to Francis Pickens.

    Fort Hill, SC - 6 May 1845

    I cannot disapprove of your declining the mission to England. I see many difficulties in any Southern man accepting it under existing circumstances

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 22 May 1845

    It was scarcely in the power of Mr Polk to treat me badly. I would consider it, at least, as much a favour to him for me to remain in office under his administration, as he could to me, to invite me to remain.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Donelson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 23 May 1845

    the latter containing the gratifying intelligence, that all the obstacles in the way of the annexation of Texas have been removed

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 7 June 1845

    Your political reflections are just. Nothing is wanting to enable the South to have a decided control in the presidential election, but firmness, but the great difficulty has heretofore been with Virginia

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 23 June 1845

    I fear with you, that Wise is pursuing an injudicious course in reference to the Slave trade. My instructions to him were full and pointed on the necessity of preserving the most friendly relations with Brazil in every respect.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 12 August 1845

    The Administration is very weak. Its course has neither indicated wisdom nor firmness.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 18 September 1845

    I am much urged to return to the Senate. My inclination is against it; but the state of our affairs, external and internal, is so critical, that I should feel it my duty to serve

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Cane Brake - 13 December 1845

    You will have seen, that I have again been elected to the Senate, much against my inclination, but under such circumstances that I could not with propriety decline accepting.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Cane Brake - 14 December 1845

    I have read the Message hastily. I fear we shall have trouble about Oregon.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 16 January 1846

    The question of peace and war is still very uncertain. Every thing will depend on the Senate, and the course of Whigs in the body.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 16 January 1846

    You seem to think, that I yielded to the solicitations of a few persons, who were not my real friends, and that I came under pledges to renounce all pretensions to the Presidency.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 29 January 1846

    You will have seen by previous conveyance, that I have taken my stand on the side of peace, with what success time only can decide.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 25 February 1846

    I will submit your proposition about your negroes to Andrew, before I give an answer. Your proposal is based on fair and equitable principles.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 23 March 1846

    Of the other copies of my speech on the Oregon question, one is intended for yourself and the others to be disposed of as you please. The translation and publication of one in the German language might have a good effect.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 23 March 1846

    But in the midst of these gratifying indications, I soon saw, that I had excited the jealousy of party leaders on both sides. Their Organs, the Intelligencer and the Union, gave sure indications of that.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 29 March 1846

    I now write simply to inform you, that the treaty has been ratified by the Senate in a manner highly honorable to you.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 0 April 1846

    With proper management the Oregon question and the Mexican difficulties could have been long since settled

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 1 April 1846

    I sent a few days since a copy of my speech on the Oregon question and Fremont's report to you and also to James. I hope they both have been received.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 12 May 1846

    As a Mexican question, it is to be deplored without looking beyond; but I regard that far less so, than its effects on our European relations.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 14 May 1846

    You will have seen by the papers that war is declared, and the course I deemed it my duty to take in reference to it. Never was so momentous a measure adopted, with so much precipitancy; so little thought; or forced through by such objectionable mean

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 28 May 1846

    You will see by the papers, that our Army has achieved brilliant Victories over the Mexicans, who by the by fought well. The Military feeling of the country is much excited and very high.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 29 May 1846

    I have seen enough of publick men to come to the conclusion, that there are few, indeed, whose attachment to self is not stronger, than their patriotism, and their friendship.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 11 June 1846

    The most important political news is, that it is now almost certain, that the Oregon question will be settled.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 11 June 1846

    I came here to preserve the peace of the country, if it could be, consistently with its honor and durable interest. It was menaced with an English and a Mexican war, in consequence of the great mismanagement by the Executive

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 2 July 1846

    The settlement of the Oregon question has given great, and, I may almost say, universal satisfaction.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 11 July 1846

    The South and the West have never been so strongly united before; not only in reference to the Tariff, but the publick bonds, the warehousing policy; and all other questions save Oregon, which now that it is settled, will soon disappear.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 29 July 1846

    The Whigs will make violent efforts to produce a reaction. They yield their hold on us with deep growles.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 30 July 1846

    The Subtreasury is now before the Senate and will doubtless pass. Indeed, it is not a little remarkable, that all the great measures I have advocated are in a fair way of being consummated

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 8 August 1846

    I leave here in the morning tomorrow for the White Sulphur Springs where Mrs Calhoun and Cornelia are waiting me to join them; and write in all the haste

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 8 August 1846

    I expect to leave tomorrow morning to join your Sister and Cornelia at the White Sulphur Springs on my way home.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 15 September 1846

    The course you indicate as proper to be taken in reference to Mexico, however wise, is one, which I cannot hope that the Administration would be induced to adopt.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 20 September 1846

    Your remarks in reference to my Memphis Report shows, that you rightly appreciate the state of parties with us, and its probable effects, in bringing about a reorganization of parties.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 29 October 1846

    I have just finished the preperation of a paper giving my views on the subject of changing the mode of appointing the electors, in complyance with the request of several of the members elect of this District.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 21 November 1846

    You evince good judgement, in preferring a new and growing country to an old, and decaying, or even a stationary one.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 12 December 1846

    I can see no immediate end of the Mexican War. It seems certain, that an attack is contemplated on Vera Cruz both by sea and land; but mainly by the latter.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 27 December 1846

    Your letter made your Grandfather very happy.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 27 December 1846

    The Mexican war is the great and absorbing question. Many now begin to see, that it is like to prove a very troublesome and embarrassing affair

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 30 January 1847

    Nothing stands between the country and unbounded prosperity in all branches of its industry, but the unfortunate Mexican war.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 17 February 1847

    The country is, indeed, in a sad Condition, and the principles and doctrines of the Republican party are in a fair way of being permanently subverted through the weakness and folly of the administration.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Charleston, SC - 9 March 1847

    I have just returned from addressing a very large and enthusiastick meeting. It is said to be the largest ever held here. I find perfect unanimity here, including Whigs and democrats.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 19 March 1847

    On my return, I met Mrs Calhoun in Charleston waiting my arrival. My reception by the city authorities and the citizens generally was warm, and even enthusiastick never more so.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 20 March 1847

    The grievance of which you speak, in reference to the proposed substitution of a horse mail from Abbeville to the Double wells on the Georgia rail road, admits of no remedy, but the repeal of the act of Congress passed three years since

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 28 March 1847

    I see by the contents of your letter, that you have misunderstood me on a point, where I had supposed my meaning was very obvious.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 11 April 1847

    The spring has been very backward; but the weather has been warm and dry since the commencement of the month, and vegitation has pushed forward with great rapidity.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 17 April 1847

    The mistake, which I think you and the most of my friends make in reference to myself is, that you do not fully realize how completely I hold my own advancement subordinate to what I deem my duty to the Country.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 6 May 1847

    The views you take in reference to Ritchie, and the position in which it has placed me in reference to the hunker portion of the party are perfectly correct.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 10 June 1847

    I am happy to hear, you are all so well, and that the children are making such progress; not in what is called learning only, but what is vastly more important at their age, in good sense and habits.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 10 June 1847

    After giving the subject the most deliberat consideration, I cannot concur with you in opinion as to the expediency or propriety of my attending.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 15 June 1847

    By having done my duty fully in reference to the Mexican war, as it relates both to its origin and the mode it ought to have been conducted, I stand free of all responsibility, and independent of both parties, and their entanglement.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 1 July 1847

    There begins to be a good deal of feelings in this quarter in reference to the navigation of the Savanah River and Mr Sloane has been appointed by the farmers society

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 8 July 1847

    The difference between North and South is daily increasing, in reference to the Slave question. It is hard to say to what it is destined to come.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 24 July 1847

    The Mexican war has been at a stand. There is ever[y] now and then a movement in favour of General Taylor.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 13 August 1847

    I am not at all surprised, that the victories our arms have achieved in Mexico should make so, deep an impression in Europe.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 6 September 1847

    I agree with you, that the political condition of all western Europe is very unsettled, and especially France. Nor are we much better off. Our future is very uncertain.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 24 October 1847

    You will have seen by the papers, that the City of Mexico is in possession of our army

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 9 November 1847

    I foresee a session of great distraction and confusion. The old party organization cannot much longer hold together.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 13 November 1847

    The position of the country is very critical. Great caution and great firmness combined are necessary to extricate it from its present difficulties

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 10 December 1847

    The Whigs have a small, but appearantly decided majority in the House, and the Democrats a large, but not a very reliable majority in the Senate.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 11 December 1847

    You of course have seen the Message and the course it indicates to be pursued towards Mexico. The impression here is, that it is intended to conquor and subject the whole country.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 26 December 1847

    If they should be defeated, We may look for the entire conquest and subjugation of Mexico. What a fearful result it will be for our country and institutions!

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 4 February 1848

    It brought to the surface the strong feeling, which had been working below in favour of the conquest and holding as a Province, or annexing all Mexico

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 20 February 1848

    We have constant rumours of peace, but I can see no certain prospect of getting it.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Senate Chamber, MD - 23 February 1848

    The treaty with Mexico has just been laid before the Senate, and read. It will be warmly opposed, but I think it will be approved by the body.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 7 March 1848

    You must not suppose, that in contending against corruption and interest, that I am impelled by the hope of success. Had that been the case, I would long since have retired from the conflict.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 7 March 1848

    the only occurrence, in the political world on this side, of marked importance, is the treaty with Mexico. It is now under deliberation in the Senate, and has been for the last nine days.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 22 March 1848

    The Cambria brought us the intelligence of the Revolution in Paris, the overthrow of the late dynasty and the establishment of a Republick.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 1 April 1848

    I am very happy to learn by your's and Anna's letters by the Caledonia, that you were all well, and that Belgium was so quiet

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 13 April 1848

    The prospect of peace with Mexico has not changed, and the presidential question continues as doubtful as it was.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 15 April 1848

    It is clear, that the old monarchies on the continent of Europe are about coming to an end. The intelligence and progress of the age have out grown them

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 16 April 1848

    Everything here is in a state of uncertainty, in reference to the Presidential election. The parties are more distracted than ever.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 28 April 1848

    We all, on this side of the Atlantick, look with intense solicitude on the great events, transpiring in Europe, and no one more so than myself.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 13 May 1848

    My apprehension is, that the old system of things have been overthrown, before Europe had become prepared to establish a new and better; and that a long period of confusion and disorder, if not anarchy, may intervene

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 22 May 1848

    I am happy to have your approval of my remarks in reference to the French Revolution. I see they have attracted much attention in England, and drawn forth high compliments.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 26 May 1848

    I see by our last arrival, that France and Germany are begining the work of reconstruction.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 23 June 1848

    There is no prospect of a successful termination of the efforts of France to establish a free popular Government; nor was there any from the begining.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 9 July 1848

    The Senate is engaged in a debate on the Oregon territorial bill.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 23 July 1848

    As to the Presidential election, it is very doubtful, and will probably remain so, to the last. There is no enthusiasm about it. There are great objections to both candidates.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 11 August 1848

    The Oregon territorial bill from the House was passed last evening by the Senate with an amendment attaching the Missouri Compromise to it.

  • John Calhoun letter to James Edward Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 19 November 1848

    I am much gratified to learn, that you have made a conditional sale of your Millwood property on such favourable terms.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 24 January 1849

    The meeting of the Southern members took place again last Monday night. My address was adopted by a decided majority.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 10 April 1849

    I had a safe and pleasant journey home. The weather was pleasant and Spring was rapidly advancing. The Jessamine and Dogwood were in bloom, and the forest had just commenced clo[th]ing itself with green.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 15 June 1849

    It is, indeed, distressing to be so far off and for so long a time from those so dear to us; but let us rather look forward to when we shall again meet, than indulge in unavailing sorrows.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 23 June 1849

    I read the account of your proceedings with reference to the Slave question with pleasure. Both tone and substance are good.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 24 July 1849

    It is high time the South should begin to prepare. I see no hope of bringing the North to a sense of justice, but by our united action, and for that purpose, a Convention of the South is indispensable.

  • John Calhoun letter to Duff Green.

    Fort Hill, SC - 4 August 1849

    You are right, as to the source, whence Benton draws his support. He has bribed the papers at the seat of Government by jobs at the publick expense

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Fort Hill, SC - 24 August 1849

    Politically I have nothing good to write. The appearance is, that Taylor's administration will prove a failure. I fear he is in the hands of the Northern Whigs

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 14 October 1849

    My correspondence is necessarily heavy. It occupies one day and sometimes two a week; but what mainly occupies me, is the work I have on hand.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Fort Hill, SC - 22 October 1849

    Mississippi has acted well on the slave question, and I hope Alabama and every other Southern State will back her and send delegates to Nashville.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 2 December 1849

    There is much confusion in the ranks of both parties and it is thought it will be difficult to elect a Speaker.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 8 December 1849

    Congress has been in Session now for four days without being able to elect a speaker. It is uncertain when one can be elected.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 31 December 1849

    Since my arrival here I have allotted most of my spare time to preparing my manuscript for the press.

  • John Calhoun letter to Andrew Pickens Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 12 January 1850

    The issue between the South and the North is the all absorbing subject here, although one would not think so who would judge from the party Organs here.

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 6 February 1850

    I received yours of the 8th Jan'y. a short time before the commencement of my recent illness, of which I suppose the papers have informed you. The disease was a modified case of the Pneumonia.

  • John Calhoun letter to Anna Maria Calhoun.

    Washington, MD - 24 February 1850

    My strength gradually continued to return, but slowly, until I had so far recovered, that I was enabled to take my seat in the Senate last monday and hoped to be able to address the Senate

  • John Calhoun letter to Thomas Clemson.

    Washington, MD - 10 March 1850

    Since then, my health continues to improve and my strength is so far returned, that I am able to take my seat in the senate and a part in the discussions of the body.