Letters written to Henry Clay during the years 1804 thru 1848

Henry Clay

119 Letters written to Henry Clay from 27 author(s) including Peter Buell Porter , and James Madison from places such as Black Rock, NY, Washington, MD and New Orleans, LA. Who did Henry Clay know?

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  • Peter Buell Porter letter to Henry Clay.

    Black Rock, NY - 23 May 0

    I have noticed, with great satisfaction, the accounts of the numerous demonstrations of confidence and respect shown to you by the people of the South, during your late tour

  • James Brown letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 16 September 1804

    Your last letter was dated at the Springs, where you were reveling in the enjoyments of ease, mirth, and engaging society.

  • James Brown letter to Henry Clay.

    New Orleans, LA - 12 March 1805

    It gives me real pleasure to hear from every quarter that you stand in Kentucky at the head of your profession.

  • James Brown letter to Henry Clay.

    New Orleans, LA - 1 September 1808

    Before I had the pleasure of your last very agreeable letter, the news of the death of our venerable friend [Colonel Hart] had reached us.

  • Langdon Cheves letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 30 July 1812

    You ask me, "What notice you ought to take of Randolph's reply?"" certainly none none whatever.

  • James Monroe letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 28 August 1812

    We have just heard with equal astonishment and concern, that General Hall has surrendered, by capitulation, the army under his command at Detroit, to the British force

  • William Henry Harrison letter to Henry Clay.

    Cincinnati, OH - 29 August 1812

    The rumored disasters upon our north-western frontier, are now ascertained to be correct.

  • William Henry Harrison letter to Henry Clay.

    Cincinnati, OH - 30 August 1812

    Without farther preamble then, I inform you that in my opinion, your presence on the frontier of this State would be productive of great advantages

  • James Monroe letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 17 September 1812

    Every effort has been made by the government to remedy the shameful and disastrous loss of the army and fort at Detroit

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Paris, FRA - 8 April 1814

    William Crawford letter to Henry Clay... The events which have within a few days passed in this city, and in its neighborhood, have changed every thing in France...

  • Albert Gallatin letter to Henry Clay.

    London, ENG - 22 April 1814

    We have just heard of your arrival, but have received no letters ; and I am yet ignorant whether I am one of the new commission to treat of peace.

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Paris, FRA - 10 June 1814

    William Crawford letter to Henry Clay... The change in the place of the negotiation for peace will enable me to write to you frequently...

  • Albert Gallatin letter to Henry Clay.

    London, ENG - 13 June 1814

    The armament fitted against America will enable the British, besides providing for Canada, to land at least 15 to 20,000 men on the Atlantic coast.

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Paris, FRA - 4 July 1814

    William Crawford letter to Henry Clay... I am not sanguine in my expectations of peace. If the failure of your exertions, to put an end to the war, shall succeed in producing unanimity at home, we shall have no cause to lament that failure.

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Paris, FRA - 9 July 1814

    William Crawford letter to Henry Clay... It appears that we differ in opinion upon two points. You believe that the British Government will not hesitate to make peace...

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Paris, FRA - 19 July 1814

    William Crawford letter to Henry Clay... I dined a few days ago in company with the Marquis of Buckinghamshire. We conversed long and freely upon the subject of the approaching negotiation.

  • James Monroe letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 30 October 1815

    Since the overthrow of France, Russia has acquired the highest degree of political importance in relation to these States.

  • Albert Gallatin letter to Henry Clay.

    New York, NY - 23 November 1815

    You must have received a letter from the Treasury similar to that written to me respecting duties on our baggage. I have not answered mine, wishing first to know what you intend to do.

  • Albert Gallatin letter to Henry Clay.

    New York, NY - 4 January 1816

    On 7th of June we delivered to the British plenipotentiaries our project of treaty, containing, as part of the 2d Article

  • James Madison letter to Henry Clay.

    Montpelier, VA - 30 August 1816

    Mr. Dallas seems to have made up his mind to retire early in October from the department in his hands

  • James Monroe letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 4 March 1817

    I had the honor to receive your letter of yesterday last night

  • Peter Buell Porter letter to Henry Clay.

    Albany, NY - 29 January 1822

    I think I do not deceive you when I say that your prospects here are highly flattering.

  • Peter Buell Porter letter to Henry Clay.

    Black Rock, NY - 8 July 1822

    It has been the misfortune of this State, that for a number of years past, its political concerns have been managed, or rather distracted, by a few ambitious men, whose views have extended only to their own personal aggrandizement

  • Langdon Cheves letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 July 1822

    I have put your brother in nomination, and his and your wish will be duly and respectfully considered.

  • Peter Buell Porter letter to Henry Clay.

    Black Rock, NY - 17 November 1823

    The cleverest fellow in our delegation is Dudley Marvin, a new member from Ontario, to whom I have given a letter of introduction to you.

  • James Madison letter to Henry Clay.

    Montpelier, VA - 24 April 1824

    candor obliges me to add that I can not concur in the extent to which the pending bill carries the tariff, nor in some of the reasoning by which it is advocated.

  • Josiah Johnston letter to Henry Clay.

    New York, NY - 19 August 1824

    There is little feeling in New England for Adams. The ultra Federalists hate him, the moderate feel indifference

  • Josiah Johnston letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 September 1824

    I purposely avoided seeing General M'Clure at Albany, satisfied it was better for Rochester to communicate with him than me

  • Josiah Johnston letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 September 1824

    I attended a meeting of your friends

  • Josiah Johnston letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 September 1824

    We agree in every particular with regard to the Vice-Presidency. You can not change your position, and your friends are not disposed.

  • John Jordan Crittenden letter to Henry Clay.

    Frankfort, KY - 15 February 1825

    We are all waiting with breathless impatience, to know the result of the Presidential election.

  • William Creighton letter to Henry Clay.

    Chillicothe, OH - 19 February 1825

    I was gratified to learn by the mail of this morning that the long agony is over, and particularly that the contest was terminated on the first ballot.

  • John Tyler letter to Henry Clay.

    Charles City, VA - 27 March 1825

    I am on the contrary fully impressed with the belief that the United States owes you a deep debt of gratitude

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 0 April 1825

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... I am obliged to you for a copy of your address to your constituents.

  • John Marshall letter to Henry Clay.

    Richmond, VA - 4 April 1825

    I have long since ceased to credit charges destitute of proof, and to consider them as mere aspersions.

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 8 June 1825

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... We are glad to learn, through the papers, that you have been able to leave the city for a little visit into Maryland...

  • John Quincy Adams letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 12 August 1825

    There is in my mind but one objection to the appointment which you suggest

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 28 September 1825

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... Under another cover I send you what has occurred to me on the subject of our trade with England.

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 13 October 1825

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... The subject of the recent British order is exciting some little attention, as you will have observed, in the commercial cities...

  • James Brown letter to Henry Clay.

    Paris, FRA - 13 October 1825

    most sincerely sympathize with you and Mrs. Clay in the sad calamity you have suffered in the loss of your dear little daughter.

  • John Quincy Adams letter to Henry Clay.

    Quincy, MA - 12 September 1826

    I learn, with much concern, that your health did not derive, from your visit home, so much benefit as you had anticipated.

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 1 January 1827

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... I am satisfied, upon my conscience, that the whole business originated with General J. himself...

  • James Madison letter to Henry Clay.

    Montpelier, VA - 24 March 1827

    Its object is to obtain from Mr. Gallatin a small service for our university, and that with as little delay as may be.

  • Richard Rush letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 23 June 1827

    I have just read Lord Grey's speech, and can not resist the desire I have to send it to you.

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 24 July 1827

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... Your reply to General Jackson's letter is admirable, and has been most favorably received every where, at least on this side the Allegheny.

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 22 August 1827

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... I can not think General Jackson will ever recover from the blow which he has received.

  • Richard Rush letter to Henry Clay.

    unknown - 18 December 1827

    Your invitation and Mrs. Clay's to your winter evenings, got to my hands this morning, and I have passed it to my wife's.

  • John Marshall letter to Henry Clay.

    Richmond, VA - 5 January 1828

    I thank you for the copy of your address on the charges made against you respecting the election of President

  • James Madison letter to Henry Clay.

    Montpelier, VA - 6 January 1828

    I have duly received the copy of your address politely forwarded to me.

  • James Barbour letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 27 January 1828

    I intentionally delayed writing till the last moment, under a high hope of giving you some determinate information of the person best to present for the Vice-Presidency

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Woodlawn, VA - 28 February 1828

    William Crawford letter to Henry Clay... I hope you know me too well to suppose that I have countenanced the charge of corruption which has been reiterated against you. The truth is, I approved of your vote for Mr. Adams

  • Francis Brooke letter to Henry Clay.

    Richmond, VA - 28 February 1828

    They decline to accept the appointment, as was apprehended, though with the expression of sentiments

  • Nicholas Biddle letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 May 1828

    I began by ascertaining from the records of the Bank the accuracy of your statement

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 0 June 1828

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... The toast in which you were named was received with the most enthusiastic applause.

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 1 July 1828

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... A strong manifestation of kindly feeling toward you, personally, has very generally appeared...

  • Peter Buell Porter letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 15 July 1828

    For the first ten days of my official labor, or, rather, reconnoissance, I found myself located in a field so entirely new and strange, that I could not move a single step without encountering some serious obstacle.

  • Richard Rush letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 3 August 1828

    I congratulate you on the issue of the Louisiana election, hoping that you will follow suit in old Kentuck.

  • John Marshall letter to Henry Clay.

    Richmond, VA - 28 November 1828

    I need not say how deeply I regret the loss of Judge Trimble. He was distinguished for sound sense, uprightness of intention, and legal knowledge.

  • John Jordan Crittenden letter to Henry Clay.

    Frankfort, KY - 3 December 1828

    Though recent occurrences have a good deal depressed my spirits, my principles forbid me to despair.

  • James Brown letter to Henry Clay.

    Paris, FRA - 13 February 1829

    I am happy to find that you have borne your disappointment and loss of place with so much true philosophy.

  • Francis Brooke letter to Henry Clay.

    Richmond, VA - 23 February 1829

    I hasten to answer your letter of to-day. The intelligence it gives of the proposed Cabinet had reached here on yesterday, and filled the Jackson party with consternation.

  • John Quincy Adams letter to Henry Clay.

    Meridian Hill, MD - 21 April 1829

    A struggle by certain individuals of the old Federal party to recover the ascendency they had lost, may render a reaction of the Republicans necessary for their own defense

  • John Quincy Adams letter to Henry Clay.

    Meridian Hill, MD - 2 May 1829

    The Catholic Question has assumed in England an aspect entirely new ; and is presenting appearances quite unexpected.

  • James Brown letter to Henry Clay.

    New York, NY - 1 November 1829

    You will see by the papers our safe arrival announced in the unusually short passage of twenty-four days, during which time we enjoyed fine weather

  • John Quincy Adams letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 11 December 1829

    I offer you my warm and sincere thanks as well for your condolence as for your congratulations.

  • William Henry Harrison letter to Henry Clay.

    Maysville, KY - 11 April 1830

    I had forwarded your letter to General Bolivar, from Bogota, and that I had received a note from him acknowledging its reception

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 18 April 1830

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... The President means to be re-elected. He has meant so all along.

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 29 May 1830

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... The passage of the Indian bill, and the rejection of the maysville Turnpike bill, have occasioned unusual excitement.

  • Peter Buell Porter letter to Henry Clay.

    Black Rock, NY - 6 October 1830

    This cursed anti-masonry embarrasses every thing, and defeats all attempts at systematic operation against the common enemy.

  • James Madison letter to Henry Clay.

    Montpelier, VA - 9 October 1830

    I have just been favored with yours of the 22d ultimo, inclosing a copy of your address delivered at Cincinnati.

  • Josiah Johnston letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 October 1830

    We have been greatly shocked to-day by the sudden and unexpected death of Mrs. Brown.

  • Nicholas Biddle letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 November 1830

    I am now satisfied, that it would be inexpedient to apply at present for the renewal of the charter.

  • Biddle Nicholas letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 November 1830

    After keeping the subject long under advisement, in order to observe the latest development of facts, I am now satisfied that it would be inexpedient to apply at present for the renewal of the Charter.

  • Richard Rush letter to Henry Clay.

    York, NY - 14 April 1831

    Is there no way in which, without doing violence to whatever opinions or feelings you may have as respects masonry, or without offending that institution, you could conciliate to a fair and reasonable extent the good will of Anti-Masons

  • John Quincy Adams letter to Henry Clay.

    Quincy, MA - 7 September 1831

    I have availed myself of both these occasions to lay before our countrymen throughout the Union, the opinions which I have constantly entertained upon the doctrine of Nullification

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 31 October 1831

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... Mr. Everett was kind enough to show me your letter to him, stating the results of the Kentucky election.

  • James Barbour letter to Henry Clay.

    Barboursville, VA - 7 March 1832

    You have obliged me much by furnishing me with your speech on the Tariff.

  • James Madison letter to Henry Clay.

    Montpelier, VA - 22 March 1832

    I know only that the Tariff, in its present amount and form, is a source of deep and extensive discontent ; and I fear that, without alleviations, separating the more moderate from the more violent opponents, very serious effects are threatened.

  • Nicholas Biddle letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 August 1832

    You ask what is the effect of the Veto. My impression is that it is working as well as the friends of the Bank and of the country could desire.

  • James Brown letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 September 1832

    I have received, with feelings of the deepest sorrow, the intelligence of the decease of our lamented Mrs. Hart, conveyed by your letter.

  • James Brown letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 November 1832

    The intelligence of your death was accompanied, perhaps preceded, by its contradiction.

  • Biddle Nicholas letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 28 February 1833

    I have a great deal to say, or rather to ask, about the manner in which you have been able to draw out the lightning from all the clouds which were lowering over the country

  • John Marshall letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 13 March 1833

    My nephew, Marshall Jones, purposes to remove to New Orleans with a view to the practice of the law, and is, I believe, now in that place.

  • Biddle Nicholas letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 March 1833

    For such an exhibition, I substituted a large meeting of gentlemen at my own house, where his friends could have the pleasure of seeing him, without imposing upon him the necessity of making any exposition of his views on any subject.

  • James Madison letter to Henry Clay.

    Montpelier, VA - 2 April 1833

    May there not be a more important alleviation in embryo an assimilation of the employment of labor in the South to its employment in the North?

  • James Madison letter to Henry Clay.

    Montpelier, VA - 0 June 1833

    It is obvious that the Constitution meant to allow the President an adequate time to consider the bills, etc., presented to him, and to make his objections to them ; and on the other hand, that Congress should have time to consider and overrule the o

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Columbus, OH - 10 June 1833

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay... I have at length reached this point, after having been greatly delayed by the state of the roads, produced by excessive rains.

  • letter to Henry Clay.

    Chillicothe, OH - 22 June 1833

    Daniel Webster letter to Henry Clay...Now that the scourge has departed, as I hope, from your immediate neighborhood... yet I can well conceive that you must have lost valued friends

  • Harrison Gray Otis letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 22 October 1833

    My youngest son, the delight of our eyes and our lives, is suddenly arrested by disease, in the bloom and vigor of youth, and is, as his physicians fear, on his dying bed.

  • Biddle Nicholas letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 January 1835

    I have been thinking for some days past whether the time had not come when another interposition of yours is not needed to save the country from great trouble.

  • James Madison letter to Henry Clay.

    Montpelier, VA - 31 January 1835

    War is the more to be avoided, if it can be done without inadmissible sacrifices, as a maritime war, to which the United States should be a party, and Great Britain neutral, has no aspect which is not of an ominous cast.

  • James Barbour letter to Henry Clay.

    Barboursville, VA - 2 August 1835

    since our retrograde movement in April, in this State, I have desponded almost to despair.

  • George Mcduffie letter to Henry Clay.

    Abbeville, FRA - 27 January 1836

    We go to war for five millions, which is sponged out by the declaration, and with a certainty that we shall lose ten times as much, and never can compel France to pay one cent.

  • Dolley Madison letter to Henry Clay.

    Montpelier, VA - 8 November 1836

    The sources of consolation in my bereavement which you suggest, are those which my heart can most truly appreciate.

  • Nicholas Biddle letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 February 1838

    You may readily suppose that we are not idle while this insane Sub Treasury scheme is urged forward

  • Nicholas Biddle letter to Henry Clay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 September 1838

    Your introduction of Mr Burnley, Commissioner of Texas, makes it not unnatural to confer with you on the subject of the loan which he is endeavoring to negotiate.

  • Harrison Gray Otis letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 24 December 1838

    Anti-Masonry I consider as effete in itself. There is no longer zeal among its votaries.

  • Harrison Gray Otis letter to Henry Clay.

    Boston, MA - 11 January 1839

    Wednesday is assigned for choice of Senator. Mr. W. will be nominated at his own request, and will, doubtless, be chosen.

  • William Henry Harrison letter to Henry Clay.

    North Bend, OH - 15 November 1840

    Since my letter to you, I have thought that our personal meeting might give rise to speculations, and even jealousies, which it might be well to avoid

  • Peter Buell Porter letter to Henry Clay.

    Saratoga Springs, NY - 28 January 1841

    I was met, on my arrival here, by a confidential communication, through my nephew, the Speaker, from Mr. Webster

  • Peter Buell Porter letter to Henry Clay.

    Niagara Falls, NY - 20 February 1841

    As you may not have correctly understood that part of my nephew's communication, I will now state it a little more at large.

  • Peter Buell Porter letter to Henry Clay.

    Niagara Falls, NY - 20 August 1841

    I wrote you from Albany, a few days since, on the subject of a National Bank, to be owned by the several States in their corporate capacities

  • Richard Rush letter to Henry Clay.

    Sydenham, PA - 14 February 1842

    I am living here- on a few acres that I like so much better than the town, that although near enough to hear its bells, when the wind sets right, I never go there when I can help it

  • Richard Rush letter to Henry Clay.

    Sydenham, PA - 15 February 1842

    I am contemplating some continuation of the work, and may have occasion to speak somewhat more fully perhaps on that topic

  • Martin Van Buren letter to Henry Clay.

    Hills Of Santee, SC - 26 March 1842

    It is not quite certain that I will be able to stay long enough in Kentucky to pay Mrs. Clay and yourself a visit

  • Peter Buell Porter letter to Henry Clay.

    New York, NY - 11 October 1843

    Mr. Webster, on leaving here two days ago, assured this friend, that he should return to Massachusetts with a determination to re-unite himself to the Whig party, and give it his best support.

  • John Quincy Adams letter to Henry Clay.

    Quincy, MA - 11 October 1843

    Nothing could give us more pleasure than to accept your offered hospitality and to visit you at your residence at Ashland.

  • Peter Buell Porter letter to Henry Clay.

    New York, NY - 13 October 1843

    it seems to have been generally known among Mr. Webster's friends here, that I had, at the pressing solicitation of one of them, although under the declared conviction that it could produce no useful result, written to you on the subject of a reconci

  • John Sloane letter to Henry Clay.

    Columbus, OH - 9 May 1844

    About the time mentioned by Buchanan, or, perhaps, some earlier, I met with General Houston at Mr. Fletcher's boardinghouse

  • John Sloane letter to Henry Clay.

    Wooster, MA - 20 June 1844

    I had thought of delaying my statement until then, but since the receipt of your last, I have determined to make it to-morrow

  • John Sloane letter to Henry Clay.

    Wooster, MA - 20 June 1844

    In December, 1824, about the time that the choice of President by the House of Representatives was beginning to attract attention at Washington, I happened in company with General Houston

  • John Jordan Crittenden letter to Henry Clay.

    Frankfort, KY - 13 November 1844

    The intelligence brought to us this morning has terminated all our hopes, our suspense, and our anxieties, in respect to the Presidential election.

  • John Quincy Adams letter to Henry Clay.

    Washington, MD - 4 January 1845

    Commodore Jesse D. Elliot has committed to my charge, to be transmitted to you, a bronze medal, which he has caused to be struck in honor of Mr. J. Fenimore Cooper

  • George Howard letter to Henry Clay.

    Castle Howard, ENG - 17 April 1846

    The reason for my breaking in at all upon the repose. of Ashland (a repose, however, against the cause of which I protest in common with the sound sense of mankind at large), is to satisfy the request of a friend

  • Zachary Taylor letter to Henry Clay.

    Monterey, MEX - 4 November 1847

    I fully agree with you in the necessity for more deliberation in the selection of a candidate for the Presidency, and I truly regret that my name should have been used in that relation.

  • Zachary Taylor letter to Henry Clay.

    Baton Rouge, LA - 28 December 1847

    I left Mexico after it was determined the column under my orders was to act on the defensive, and after the capital of the enemy had fallen into our hands, and their army dispersed, on a short leave of absence, to visit my family

  • Zachary Taylor letter to Henry Clay.

    Baton Rouge, LA - 30 April 1848

    I conceive I am, owing to circumstances which I could not well avoid, placed in rather a peculiar situation, as regards my being a candidate for the Presidency.

  • Winfield Scott letter to Henry Clay.

    Elizabethtown, NJ - 19 July 1848

    It is now sixty days since I landed on the Jersey shore, with a Mexican disease upon me, and although obliged to travel and to engage in the most vexatious and disgusting work, I have not had the strength to walk three hundred yards

  • Zachary Taylor letter to Henry Clay.

    Baton Rouge, LA - 17 November 1848

    I trust I have many devoted personal friends, who, from various causes, were opposed to my reaching the office in question, and took every honorable and proper means in their power, and no other, to prevent my success