Letters written to George Washington during the years 1775 thru 1797

George Washington

872 Letters written to George Washington from 74 author(s) including Nathanael Greene from places such as Providence, RI, Lebanon, CT and Saratoga, NY. Who did George Washington know?

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  • sponsored contentBenedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Fort Western, ME - 25 September 1775

    I found the bateaux completed, but many of them smaller than the directions given, and very badly built ; of course I have been obliged to order twenty more, to bring on the remainder of the provisions

  • sponsored contentAlexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 0 November 1777

    I arrived here yesterday, at noon, and waited upon General Gates immediately, on the business of my mission ; but was sorry to find his ideas did not correspond with yours for drawing off the number of troops you directed.

  • sponsored contentJohn Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 25 July 1787

    Permit me to hint whether it would not be wise and seasonable to provide a strong check to the admission of foreigners into the administration of our national government

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 12 July 1775

    I beg leave to congratulate your Excellency upon your being appointed General of the Armies of the United Colonies, which hath given sincere pleasure to every friend of America

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 13 July 1775

    Suffer me to join in congratulating you, on your appointment to be General and Commander-in-Chief of the troops raised, or to be raised, for the defence of American liberty.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Saratoga, NY - 15 July 1775

    I wish I may be able to proceed to Ticonderoga, as I am very much wanted there, the greatest confusion having taken place in the controversy between the officers claiming the command in that quarter.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 17 July 1775

    On the 1st instant I met the Honorable Assembly of this Colony, to deliberate on the request and pressing reasons sent us from the Massachusetts for an immediate augmentation of troops from this Colony.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 18 July 1775

    You will expect that I should say something about this place and the troops here. Not one earthly thing for offence or defence has been done ; the commanding officer has no orders

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 31 July 1775

    Since my last I have been most assiduously employed in preparing materials for building boats to convey me across the Lake.

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 31 July 1775

    I desire your Excellency to oblige me with a return of the army ; and when any thing of importance occurs, I shall esteem an early communication of it a favor.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 31 July 1775

    By the resolve in Congress of the 19th instant, it is recommended to the New England Colonies to complete the deficiencies in the -regiments belonging to them respectively.

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 August 1775

    We understand here, that batteries may be constructed at the entrance of the Bay of Boston, so as to prevent the egress and regress of any ships what ever.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 6 August 1775

    Immediately on my arrival here, I issued such orders respecting the provisions and stores, (which I found had been most scandalously embezzled or misapplied,) as I hoped would effectually have brought matters into a right train

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 8 August 1775

    This Colony, the last fall, not confiding entirely in the precarious supply of powder that might be expected from the merchants, imported a considerable quantity, though not so large as was ordered.

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 11 August 1775

    some of the Bermudians had been at Philadelphia, soliciting for liberty to import provisions for the use of the Island. They gave information of the powder mentioned in your letter to me, and were of opinion it might be easily obtained.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 11 August 1775

    I am informed a quantity of powder for the camp is to be at Hartford this evening, and more to follow soon. We have none lately arrived, which is daily expected.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 27 August 1775

    on my arrival at Saratoga, I received information, that a large body of Indians of the Six Nations were to be here on Tuesday last, and that my presence was indispensably necessary.

  • David Wooster letter to George Washington.

    Oyster Ponds, NY - 29 August 1775

    The inhabitants here think that, had General Schuyler known their very exposed situation, he would not have ordered the companies away. The New York Congress suppose they have no right to counteract his orders.

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 30 August 1775

    She hath since returned. The sending her on the enterprise you propose could not be done without some new and further powers from the General Assembly, which sat here last week

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 31 August 1775

    General Montgomery leaves Crown Point to-day, with twelve hundred men and four twelve-pounders. I follow him this evening

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 2 September 1775

    The Committee, appointed to act during the recess of the General Assembly, have given your proposal for taking the powder from Bermuda a full consideration, and have come to a resolution to make the attempt.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 5 September 1775

    Our coasts are kept in continual alarm. Three ships of war, with thirteen other vessels of divers sorts, were seen off Fisher's Island, and in the Sound, yesterday.

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 9 September 1775

    zealous to do every thing in our power to serve the common cause of America, the Committee have determined, instead of the small armed sloop, to send the large vessel, with fifty men, upon the Bermuda enterprise

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 14 September 1775

    This, Sir, is the time to exert ourselves in sending to Europe for powder, as the vessels may perform their voyages and return upon this coast in the winter, when the enemy's ships are unable to cruise.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 15 September 1775

    New London and Stonington are still so menaced by the ministerial ships and troops, that the militia can not be thought sufficient for their security, and it is necessary to cast up some intrenchments.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 20 September 1775

    We approached half a mile nearer and then landed without opposition, in a close, deep swamp, which extended to very near the fort. Here we formed, and marched in the best order we could towards the fort, to reconnoitre.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 26 September 1775

    If Job had been a General in my situation, his memory had not been so famous for patience. But the glorious end we have in view, and which I have confident hope will be attained, will atone for all.

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 26 September 1775

    The time for which the combined army was enlisted being nearly expired, it is of great importance to provide some method of reenlisting them, in order to keep up a sufficient force to restrain the enemy

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 September 1775

    We have no late accounts from England ; but from what we have had that can be relied on, it seems almost certain, that our enemies there must shortly meet with a total overthrow.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 September 1775

    Your letters, Numbers Four and Five, and two other letters not numbered, with the inclosures, have been duly received and laid before the Congress.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 October 1775

    If the vessels in the service of the Massachusetts Bay can be readily obtained, you are to employ them, and others, if you should think more necessary, to effect the purposes aforesaid if they can not, you will employ such as can be soonest fitted ou

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 10 October 1775

    I think it my duty to inform your Excellency, that the large sloop hath not yet returned from her Bermuda expedition, and that the small one is unfit for service

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 12 October 1775

    I am extremely apprehensive that a want of powder will be fatal to our operations. I have sent Express to Albany and New York, but have not yet learnt whether I shall be supplied or not.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Kennebec River, ME - 13 October 1775

    The men in general not understanding bateaux, have been obliged to wade, and haul them more than half way up the river.

  • George Mason letter to George Washington.

    Gunston Hall, VA - 14 October 1775

    During the first part of the Convention, parties ran so high, that we had frequently no other way of preventing improper measures, but by procrastination, urging the previous question, and giving men time to reflect.

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 October 1775

    Great bodies, you know, move slow, and it is as sure, that the most palpable and glorious events may be delayed, and the best causes finally lost by slow, timid, and indecisive counsels.

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 25 October 1775

    Captain Whipple returned here from his voyage to Bermuda on Friday last. He had received authentic intelligence of the arrival of the packet at New York

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 26 October 1775

    The reduction of Chamblee will, in all probability, be followed by that of St. John's, especially as General Montgomery has now a supply of powder

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Portsmouth, NH - 29 October 1775

    I arrived here in about twenty-four hours after I left you; have collected powder, so as to make up near thirty barrels, and have since been preparing to set an example to the other seaports, by setting the fleet at defiance.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 6 November 1775

    Should success crown our endeavours at St. John's, of which there seems to be little doubt, the entire reduction of Canada will, in all probability, be the consequence

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Point-aux-trembles, QC, CAN - 20 November 1775

    It was judged prudent, in our situation, not to hazard a battle, but retire to this place, eight leagues from Quebec, which we did yesterday, and are waiting here with impatience the arrival of General Montgomery

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 28 November 1775

    The evening before General Montgomery landed on the Island of Montreal, Mr. Carleton embarked his garrison on board of some vessels and small craft, and made two attempts to pass our batteries

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 5 December 1775

    I continued at Point-aux-Trembles until the 3d instant, when, to my great joy, General Montgomery joined us, with artillery, and about three hundred men.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Fort George, NY - 5 December 1775

    I arrived here yesterday, and made preparation to go over the Lake this morning, but General Schuyler reaching here before day, prevents my going over for an hour or two.

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 December 1775

    The proclamation, there alluded to, we have seen. It proclaims martial law through Virginia, and orders freedom to all the slaves, calling their masters rebels, &c.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 December 1775

    They have also directed General Schuyler to make diligent search for lead ; and, retaining so much as may be wanted there, to send the remainder to your camp.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Winter Hill, MA - 17 December 1775

    Agreeably to your order, have again waited on Major Rogers, and strictly examined him. Have seen his several permits, and think them genuine, and in every respect agreeable to the copy sent you.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Fort George, NY - 17 December 1775

    I returned from Ticonderoga to this place on the 15th instant, and brought with me the cannon, &c.; it having taken nearly the time I conjectured it would to transport them here.

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 19 December 1775

    Should the force sailed from Boston be destined for Rhode Island, I tremble for the consequences, as the Colony, in its present exhausted state, cannot, without assistance, defend the Island.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 December 1775

    I am authorized to inform you, that it is the pleasure of Congress that Mr. Mifflin, the Quartermaster-General, hold the rank of Colonel in the Army of the United Colonies, and that you establish his rank accordingly.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 1 January 1776

    By accounts received from the various parts of the Colony, the recruiting officers, for the Continental service, have good success in enlisting men.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 5 January 1776

    now or never is the time for every virtuous American to exert himself in the cause of liberty and his country ; and that it is become a duty cheer fully to sacrifice the sweets of domestic felicity, to attain the honest, and glorious end America has

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 13 January 1776

    My amiable friend, the gallant Montgomery, is no more ; the brave Arnold is wounded; and we have met with a severe check in an unsuccessful attempt on Quebec.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 14 January 1776

    Our loss and repulse struck an amazing panic into both officers and men, and, had the enemy improved their advantage, our affairs here must have been entirely ruined.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 15 January 1776

    The condition and circumstances of the Colony of New York give me pain, lest the friends to American liberty in that Colony should be too much neglected and become disheartened

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New Haven, CT - 16 January 1776

    I believe we shall find no difficulties in procuring a sufficient body of volunteers for the New York expedition. The unhappy accounts from Canada seem to animate these people, rather than depress.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 January 1776

    By the inclosed resolutions, you will perceive that the Congress, in providing for the defence of Canada, have directed that two battalions should be raised out of the troops now serving there.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 January 1776

    The Congress are anxious, as Avell from motives of policy as of justice and humanity, to repair our losses in that quarter, and, if possible, to gain possession of Quebec, and drive our enemies out of that country before they can be reinforced in the

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 21 January 1776

    We had procured upwards of an hundred blankets, which were designed for the army under your immediate command; but the descent upon Prudence obliged us to send forty of them to our troops upon that Island

  • David Wooster letter to George Washington.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 21 January 1776

    I herewith inclose a letter just received from Colonel Arnold, and take this opportunity most heartily to condole with you for the loss of the brave and most amiable General Montgomery

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 24 January 1776

    I thought fit this morning to acquaint Colonel Burrell, appointed to command the regiment destined to Canada from hence, that a month's pay will be advanced to officers and men by you.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Stamford, CT - 24 January 1776

    I find the people through this Province more alive and zealous than my most sanguine expectation. I believe I might have collected ten thousand volunteers.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 January 1776

    The Congress have received your letter of the 19th instant, and highly commend your prudence and zeal in applying to the Governments of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, and Connecticut, to raise forces for the service of Canada at this exigency.

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Salem, MA - 31 January 1776

    We were therefore induced to try another method, and the Committee of Safety gave the enlisting orders to a worthy man and good soldier who had served as a Lieutenant in the army the last campaign, and offered a month's pay in advance to all who woul

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 5 February 1776

    The battalion raising in this Colony, to march to the assistance of our friends at Canada, are enlisted to serve until the 1st of February next, with bounty, pay, wages, and allowances, agreeable to resolve of Congress

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 5 February 1776

    I should apprise you that General Clinton arrived almost at the same instant with myself. lie has brought no troops with him, and pledges his honor that none are coming. he says it is merely a visit to his friend Tryon

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 12 February 1776

    I am greatly concerned for the scarcity of powder and arms. We have not half a sufficiency for our selves, as the circumstances may be ; yet, anxious to furnish you, for the common good, with every supply in our power

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 14 February 1776

    We have fixed on a -spot in Long Island for a retrenched camp, which I hope will render it impossible for them to get footing on that important Island.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 27 February 1776

    The enemy, to the number of about five hundred, have twice sallied out at Palace Gate, with design of seizing our field-pieces

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 29 February 1776

    What to do with the City, I own, puzzles me. It is so encircled with deep, navigable water, that who ever commands the sea must command the town.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 29 February 1776

    The stripping Ticonderoga so entirely of its heavy cannon, is a most unfortunate circumstance, as the transportation of them from this place is a business of monstrous difficulties, expense, and labor.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 3 March 1776

    As I am the only general officer on the Continent, who can speak and think in French, I confess I think it would have been more prudent to have sent me to Canada; but I shall obey with alacrity, and hope with success.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 March 1776

    The Congress highly approve your care and attention in stopping Lord Drummond's letter, and entirely concur with you in sentiment with regard to his Lordship's officious and unwarrantable zeal.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 March 1776

    I had the honor of receiving, yesterday, yours of the 19th, containing the agreeable information of the Ministerial troops having abandoned Boston.

  • George Mason letter to George Washington.

    Gunston Hall, VA - 2 April 1776

    We have just received the welcome news of your having, with so much address and success, dislodged the Ministerial troops, and taken possession of the town of Boston.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 5 April 1776

    I most sincerely congratulate you, I congratulate the public, on the great and glorious event, your possession of Boston. It will be a most bright page in the annals of America

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Fort George, NY - 12 April 1776

    All is in readiness to move, as soon as the Lakes open, which, I hope, will be in a day or two.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 April 1776

    The Congress being determined on the reduction of Quebec, and the security of that country, for reasons too obvious to be mentioned, have left nothing undone which can any ways contribute to that end.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 25 April 1776

    The grief I feel on the evacuation of Canada by our troops, is greatly alleviated by the little loss sustained in the retreat, and the hope I have, that we shall maintain a superiority on the Lakes.

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 6 May 1776

    I also inclose a copy of an act, discharging the inhabitants of this Colony from allegiance to the King of Great Britain, which was carried in the House of Deputies, after a debate, with but six dissentient voices

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 8 May 1776

    I heartily congratulate you on the success of your arms against Boston, and am sorry it is not in my power to give you a more pleasing account of our affairs in this country, which wear no very favorable aspect at present.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 10 May 1776

    We have just received an express from North Carolina, informing us of the arrival of eight large transports in Cape Fear River, in the whole containing, as it is supposed, about two thousand men.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 May 1776

    [I] cannot help expressing the very great pleasure it would afford both Mrs. Hancock and my self to have the happiness of accommodating you during your stay in this city.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Long Island, NY - 21 May 1776

    As I have no desire of quitting the service, I hope the Congress will take no measure that will lay me under the disagreeable necessity of doing it.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Chamblee, QC, CAN - 3 June 1776

    General Thompson writes, that about eight hundred of the enemy had arrived at Three Rivers, forty-five miles below Sorel, where he is. This he has by report only.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Sorel, QC, CAN - 5 June 1776

    I arrived here at a very critical moment with my brigade. General Thompson was left but with very few men to defend this important post, the troops being scattered about in a most shocking manner.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Sorel, QC, CAN - 8 June 1776

    I received a letter from General Thompson, of which the inclosed is a copy. I find that he has proceeded in the manner proposed, and made his attack on the troops at Three Rivers, at daylight

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 June 1776

    The Congress have agreed to settle the mode of paying the troops in the Eastern Department this morning, and to proceed to the appointment of a Deputy Paymaster-General.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 12 June 1776

    I have, within this half hour, received a letter from General Arnold, of which the inclosed is a copy. I fear the next will announce the evacuation of Canada by our troops, probably with loss

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 June 1776

    I am informed that a certain Mr. Eustace, now in New York, but some time ago with Lord Dunmore, is acquainted with a practice that prevailed, of taking letters out of the post-office in Virginia, and carrying them to Dunmore for his perusal

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 June 1776

    they have bent their whole attention to our affairs in Canada, and have adopted such measures, as, in their opinion, are calculated to place them on a better and more reputable footing for the future.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 June 1776

    The Congress, having the greatest reason to believe there has been very gross misconduct in the management of our affairs in Canada, have come to a resolution to have a general inquiry made into the behaviour of the officers employed on that expediti

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Isle-aux-noix, QC, CAN - 24 June 1776

    I find myself under an absolute necessity of quitting this Island for a place more healthy- other wise the army will never be able to return, as one fortnight longer in this place will not leave us well men enough to carry off the sick

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 25 June 1776

    By this express you will receive advice from General Schuyler of our evacuating Canada, an event which I make no doubt (from our distressed situation) you have some time expected.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 June 1776

    I am, however, to request you will give orders to have a stop put to raising the Mohegan and Stockbridge Indians, as soon as possible.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Isle-aux-noix, QC, CAN - 25 June 1776

    This was not owing to my being deceived with respect to the enemy on the ground at the time I wrote, but to the sudden arrival of such a number under General Burgoyne, the night before the battle of Three Rivers

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 1 July 1776

    Yesterday morning General Gates introduced a Mr. Avery to me, who applied to me for money to carry on the Commissary-General's department here. I asked if Mr. Livingston was superseded, and begged to see how he (Avery) was authorized to act here.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 1 July 1776

    They immediately commenced the most furious fire I ever heard or saw. I confess I was in pain, from the little confidence I reposed in our troops ; the officers being all boys, and the men raw recruits.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 4 July 1776

    The retreat of the Northern army, and its present situation, have spread a general alarm. By intelligence from Major-General Schuyler, received last-evening, I have reason to conclude that they are now at Crown Point and Ticonderoga, in a weak state

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 July 1776

    the Congress have judged it necessary to dissolve the connection between Great Britain and the American Colonies, and to declare them free and independent States, as you will perceive by the in closed DECLARATION

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 July 1776

    Should the United States of America give their sanction to the Jesuitical and villanous distinction which Captain Forster adopts to justify his conduct, there would be no end to butchering our prisoners.

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Fort Montgomery, NY - 15 July 1776

    At the same time I issued orders to all the regiments in my brigade, to stand ready to march on a moment's warning, and despatched expresses to all owners of sloops and boats twenty miles up the west side of the river

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Long Island, NY - 25 July 1776

    The science or art of war requires a freedom of thought, and leisure to reflect upon the various incidents that daily occur, which cannot be had where the whole of one's time is engrossed in clerical employments.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 August 1776

    Should Congress ever empower its Generals to fill up the vacancies in the army, they know of no one in whom they would so soon repose a trust of such importance as in yourself

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 5 August 1776

    The troops from this State, destined to the northward, are marched to Bennington, and from thence to Skenesborough.

  • Thomas Mifflin letter to George Washington.

    Mount Washington, NH - 6 August 1776

    Agreeably to your order, by Colonel Reed's letter, I have directed Colonel Holden to march with his three companies this evening to King's Bridge.

  • William Livingston letter to George Washington.

    Elizabethtown, NJ - 12 August 1776

    The two thousand men for the Flying Camp, under General Dickinson, are in great forwardness, and (although very little acquainted with their duty) might answer a valuable purpose in New York

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Kings Bridge, NY - 17 August 1776

    The fire-ships were well conducted ; the armed schooner was grappled and burnt ; the Phoenix was grappled for about ten minutes, but got herself clear. The Lady Washington galley and Independence, were conducted with great judgment and bravery.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Kings Bridge, NY - 18 August 1776

    Early this morning, the Phoenix man-of-war, Rose frigate, and the two tenders, came to sail, and stood down the river, keeping close under the east shore, in order to avoid the fire of our cannon.

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 28 August 1776

    As the smallpox is now perfectly removed from the army, I shall, in consequence of the intelligence received of the motions of the enemy, immediately assemble my principal strength to maintain this important pass

  • Nicholas Cooke letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 6 September 1776

    The necessity, which caused the unexpected evacuation of Long Island, hath alarmed the General Assembly of this State, as it seems that communications cannot be kept open with an island where the enemy's ships can approach.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 9 September 1776

    I am informed that the army is in the greatest distress for medicines. As every misfortune and want they labor under is imputed to me, so is this.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 7 October 1776

    I find the enemy are encamped right opposite, to the number of between three and four thousand ; and the Major adds, from their disposition and search after boats, they design to cross the river.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 9 October 1776

    The stores at Dobbs's Ferry I had just given orders to the Quartermaster to prepare wagons to remove. I think the enemy will meet with some difficulty in crossing the river at Dobbs's Ferry. However, it is not best to trust too much to the expected d

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    New Haven, CT - 11 October 1776

    Our naval expedition against the ships of the enemy in the Sound is still in contemplation, and preparations are making for the same as fast as we can.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 24 October 1776

    Inclosed you have a copy of the letter, in answer to mine to Congress, relative to cartridges. As soon as the cartridges come up, they shall be forwarded.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Fort Lee, NJ - 31 October 1776

    The enemy have possession of Fort Independence, on the heights above King's Bridge. They made their appearance the night before last. We had got every thing of value away.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philipsburg, PA - 12 November 1776

    I am far from being satisfied with the conduct of our scouts. I do not think they venture far enough, for they generally bring back very lame, imperfect accounts.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philipsburg, PA - 19 November 1776

    The recommendation of General Greene, which you transmitted to me ; threw the officers to whom. I communicated it into so great a flame of discontent, that I ventured, notwithstanding your orders, to hesitate.

  • Charles Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philipsburg, PA - 26 November 1776

    It never was my idea to leave the Highlands unguarded, but only for expedition's sake that Heath should detach two thousand of his corps immediately over the river, and to replace these two thousand by the same number

  • Robert Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 December 1776

    I am well pleased to see the attention they pay General Lee ; and I shall make it a point to collect and send your Excellency, soon as possible, the one hundred half Johannes they order.

  • John Cadwalader letter to George Washington.

    Bristol, PA - 26 December 1776

    The river was so full of ice that it was impossible to pass above Bristol, where I intended, and there fore concluded to make an attempt at Dunks's Ferry.

  • John Cadwalader letter to George Washington.

    Burlington, PA - 27 December 1776

    As I did not hear from you this morning, and being prepared to embark, I concluded you were still on this side, and therefore embarked, and landed about fifteen hundred men about two miles above Bristol.

  • Thomas Mifflin letter to George Washington.

    Bristol, PA - 28 December 1776

    I came here at four o clock this afternoon. Five hundred men, sent from Philadelphia yesterday, crossed to Burlington this morning. This evening I sent over near three hundred more.

  • Robert Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 December 1776

    I have just received your favor of this day, and sent to General Putnam to detain the express until I collect the hard money you want, which you may depend shall be sent, in one specie or other, with this letter

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Baltimore, MD - 1 January 1777

    Your letter of that date, containing the very agreeable intelligence of the success of the Continental arms under your command, was last night delivered to me by your Aid-de-camp, Colonel Baylor

  • Robert Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 January 1777

    ever solicitous to comply with your requisitions, I am up very early this morning to despatch a supply of fifty thousand dollars to your Excellency.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Peekskill, NY - 4 January 1777

    I have just arrived here; find only part of two regiments of the militia, from the Massachusetts. The badness of the roads hath much retarded the troops.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Baltimore, MD - 6 January 1777

    General Lee's situation seems to be extremely dangerous and critical, and from General Howe's behaviour to him, it is highly probable he will be brought to a trial for desertion.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 13 January 1777

    There are, at this place and in the vicinity, about two thousand men, part of six thousand ordered from the New England States. The others are on their march, and expected in, a few days.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Williams Tavern, MA - 19 January 1777

    I summoned the fort to surrender. I have taken the liberty to inclose a copy. The answer to the summons was verbal, and in substance, that, as the Americans were excepted, they, although Britons, had no answer to return.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Burlings - 30 January 1777

    I have just received the honor of yours of the 27th instant. The last evening we moved back from the neighbourhood of King's Bridge ; General Lincoln's troops to Dobbs's Ferry and Tarrytown

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 31 January 1777

    By the best intelligence we have been able to procure of the enemy's force on Rhode Island, it consisted of about six thousand men; eleven regiments of British, and four of Hessians.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Westchester, NY - 6 February 1777

    When I received your Excellency's orders to march towards King's Bridge, nothing could be more agreeable than the manoeuvre ; but I cannot say the taking the command of a body of troops, entirely militia, was so.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 21 February 1777

    although it would have made me very happy to have been able to procure a release of all our officers in captivity, I freely acknowledge and acquiesce in the justice and impartiality of the measures you have taken respecting them.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Baltimore, MD - 25 February 1777

    From the resolves, which I have the honor of transmitting herewith, you will perceive the measures Congress have taken to reenforce your army at this juncture.

  • Robert Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 March 1777

    It is truly lamentable, that we have never been able to this day to conquer that fundamental error made in the outset by short enlistments.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Peekskill, NY - 9 March 1777

    When I had completed the disagreeable retreat from Canada, I was with circumstances of indignity. Since which, and before, every Major-General, except myself, has had the honor of commanding posts, separated from the main army.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 11 March 1777

    The new levies of the Massachusetts Bay being all ordered to Ticonderoga, and those of Connecticut inoculated for the smallpox, deprives us of the aid of Continental troops, on whom we had placed our chief dependence.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Wethersfield, CT - 16 March 1777

    But one thing still more important, concerning which should be glad to know your Excellency's mind, is the inoculation of the several Troops belonging to Col.o Sheldon's Reg.t

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 March 1777

    The principle of retaliation was early adopted by the States of America, and, if adhered to, will be the most likely way to prevent our enemies from making distinctions, which have no other foundation but the gratification of their revenge

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 26 March 1777

    I was made very unhappy, a few days since, by hearing your Excellency was exceedingly ill with a fever.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 March 1777

    The Congress have authorized you to proceed in the exchange of prisoners, agreeably to the cartel at present existing, or such other regulation. as you may think proper to make in the matter

  • letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 29 March 1777

    Patrick Henry letter to George Washington... I am very sorry to inform you, that the recruiting business of late goes on so badly, that there remains but little prospect of filling the six new battalions from this State...

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 April 1777

    The regulation. relative to the payment of the troops and the department of the Paymaster-General will, I hope, be the means of introducing order and regularity into that part of the army, where, it must be confessed, they were extremely wanted.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 April 1777

    Yesterday evening, the Congress completed the business of the Medical Department, and on so large and liberal an establishment that we may rationally expect the most beneficial effects will flow from it.

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Salem, MA - 9 April 1777

    I esteem it a singular honor done me by your Excellency in offering me the post of Adjutant-General ; and it pains me sensibly that I am obliged to decline it.

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 April 1777

    My wishes are, Sir, and I think they correspond with the true interests of America, that you should quickly be possessed of a strong army ; that your powers might be such as to gratify your wishes of crushing our enemies

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Salem, MA - 14 April 1777

    I sent, by the express, an answer to your letter respecting the office of Adjutant-General, and gave what appeared to me sufficient reasons to excuse my declining to accept it ; but I have since been uneasy lest you should deem them otherwise

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 7 May 1777

    And since, notwithstanding all my objections, tis your Excellency's pleasure, I am happy to declare my acceptance of it. At the same time, I am constrained, from my real feelings, again to express my fears that I shall fall short of your Excellency's

  • Robert Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 May 1777

    The bearer of this, the Marquis Armand de la Rouerie, is entitled to my warmest recommendations, because he brought from his own country letters to me that I am obliged to attend to, and put great faith in

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 June 1777

    the Congress have authorized you to fix on such rewards or sum of money as you may judge proper, to encourage deserters from the enemy, both horse and foot.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 5 June 1777

    A resolution, of the 30th ultimo, has been shown to me by some French officers attached to the corps of artillery under my command, ordaining that all officers of artillery, ... shall take rank, in the American artillery, according to the dates of th

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 June 1777

    You will perceive, from the inclosed resolves, the fixed determination of Congress to retaliate, as nearly as lies in their power, on our enemies, should they think proper to send any of their prisoners to Great Britain, or to any other part of the B

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Saratoga, NY - 14 June 1777

    Our numbers are so few to the northward, and we have so little prospect of their increasing, that should a disaster befall us at Ticonderoga, we should have very few troops indeed to oppose them.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Cornells Ferry, PA - 16 June 1777

    As the militia can be but illy spared at this busy season, I wish to know, as early as possible, your Excellency's orders respecting them ; if you wish to have them in the Jerseys or on this side the Delaware.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Fort Edward, NY - 16 June 1777

    If the information which Amsbury gives is to be relied upon, as I think it is, we shall soon be air tacked at Ticonderoga

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 June 1777

    Your favor of the 23d, containing the agreeable intelligence that the enemy had retreated from Brunswick, I had the honor of receiving yesterday afternoon

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 28 June 1777

    Should an accident happen to the garrison of Ticonderoga, and General Burgoyne make a push to gain the south part of the Lake, I know of no obstacle to prevent him.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Saratoga, NY - 7 July 1777

    just before they arrived at Skenesborough, they were overtaken by the enemy's vessels and gunboats, and were obliged to abandon the vessels, in which we lost all our ammunition.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Fort Edward, NY - 9 July 1777

    Since I wrote you from Saratoga, I have not been able to learn what is become of General St. Clair and the enemy. The army followed the troops that came to Skenesborough as far as Fort Ann, where they were yesterday repulsed

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Fort Edward, NY - 14 July 1777

    On the 12th instant General St. Clair arrived here. As he fell in with Hudson's River about twelve miles below this, I ordered the troops to halt at Fort Miller, having no kind of shelter for them at any other place

  • Arthur St. Clair letter to George Washington.

    Fort Edward, NY - 17 July 1777

    although I am not solicitous about the opinion of the world, though very far from Disregarding it, I wish to hold a character with your Excellency something more than merely negative.

  • Aaron Burr letter to George Washington.

    Peekskill, NY - 21 July 1777

    I was this morning favoured with your excellency's letter of the 29th ult., and my appointment to Colonel Malcolm's regiment.

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Fort Montgomery, NY - 26 July 1777

    When I had the pleasure of seeing your Excellency at Ramapo, I mentioned that the terms, for which the two militia regiments stationed at this post were engaged in service, expired the last of this month

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Saratoga, NY - 28 July 1777

    So far from the militia that are with me increasing , they are daily diminishing, and I am very confident that in ten days, if the enemy should not Disturb us, we shall not have five hundred left

  • Israel Putnam letter to George Washington.

    Peekskill, NY - 31 July 1777

    I received your favor of the 28th instant, and have, according to your direction, ordered two brigades, namely, General McDougall's and Huntington's, to put their heavy baggage over the river, and to be in readiness to march

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Stillwater, NY - 4 August 1777

    By the unanimous advice of all the General Officers, I have moved the army to this place. We propose to fortify our camp, in hopes that re-enforcements will enable us to keep our ground

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Fort Montgomery, NY - 9 August 1777

    I never knew the militia come out with greater alacrity ; but as many of them yet have great part of their harvests in the field; I fear it will be difficult to detain them long, unless the enemy make some movements that indicate a design of coming t

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Stillwater, NY - 12 August 1777

    I waited upon General Schuyler, on my way to the militia who had assembled and were assembling at Manchester, on the Grants, received his instructions, and met the troops the 2d instant.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 August 1777

    The complaints of the want of men to the north ward are so great and urgent, that Congress, with a view of affording them some assistance, have come to the inclosed resolve

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Van Schaicks Island, NY - 19 August 1777

    I have the honor to congratulate your Excellency on a signal victory gained by General Stark over a detachment of about fifteen hundred of the enemy near Bennington

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 August 1777

    This moment an express is arrived from Maryland, with an account of near two hundred sail of Mr. Howe's fleet, being at anchor in the Chesapeake Bay.

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    , NY - 22 August 1777

    Upon my leaving Philadelphia, the prospect this way appeared most gloomy, but the severe checks the enemy have met with at Bennington and Tryon county, have given a more pleasing view of public affairs.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 September 1777

    the Congress have appointed a committee to collect and arrange the evidence relative to the evacuation of Ticonderoga, which will be afterwards transmitted to you, that a court-martial may be thereupon instituted for the trial of the General Officers

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 September 1777

    Congress, desirous of reenforcing the army at this critical period, have recommended to the States of Pennsylvania and New Jersey to order out immediately a considerable part of their militia

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 September 1777

    the Congress have directed General Putnam to hold in readiness fifteen hundred men, under the command of a Brigadier, to cross the North River when you may think proper to order it.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 September 1777

    I am sorry for the unfortunate issue of the day; but from the troops keeping up their spirits, I flatter myself it will still be in our power to retrieve the loss of yesterday.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 30 September 1777

    I wish soon to receive the most pleasing accounts from you. We are in daily expectation of agreeable tidings, and that General Howe is totally reduced.

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Behmus Heights, NY - 5 October 1777

    I am sorry to repeat to your Excellency the Distress I have suffered for want of a proper supply of musket cartridges from Springfield, or the materials to make them.

  • Israel Putnam letter to George Washington.

    Fishkill, NY - 8 October 1777

    the enemy, after making a variety of movements up and down the North River, landed, on the morning of the 4th instant, about three thousand men, at Tarrytown

  • Israel Putnam letter to George Washington.

    Fishkill, NY - 8 October 1777

    I have waited on Governor Clinton, to consult about our present circumstances, and fix upon the most effectual measure that could be pursued against the enemy, who are now landing a considerable number of troops at Fort Constitution

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 9 October 1777

    It is with the highest pleasure I comply with the order of Congress, in conveying to you the inclosed resolve, expressing the thanks of that body to you for the wise and well-concerted attack upon the enemy, near Germantown

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 9 October 1777

    They have, for this end, authorized you to sentence, by court-martial, any person convicted of either of the above-mentioned offense

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 12 October 1777

    the enemy have, at different times, compelled our troops, who are prisoners with them, to labor, and that a number are at this time actually engaged in throwing up some works at and near Kensington

  • Christopher Greene letter to George Washington.

    Red Bank, NJ - 14 October 1777

    I arrived here on Saturday last with my regiment. They were much fatigued with the march, as I forced thirty-five miles one day. They are now in high spirits, and go to their duty with the greatest cheerfulness.

  • Israel Putnam letter to George Washington.

    Fishkill, NY - 16 October 1777

    Last Monday, General Parsons, with about two thousand troops, marched down and took possession of Peekskill and the passes in the Highlands.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 17 October 1777

    As the Congress will doubtless proceed to appoint a successor in my stead, on him, therefore, will devolve the business of the chair. It will fall within the line of his duty to keep up that connection and correspondence with you

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    York, NY - 20 October 1777

    was a good deal surprised to find you had been told that Congress had appointed General Conway a Major-General. No such appointment has been made ; nor do I believe it will

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    York, NY - 20 October 1777

    General Conway has not lately been mentioned in Congress, nor has there been much talk of an Adjutant-General, since it is not certainly known whether Colonel Pickering will accept his new appointment.

  • Thomas Wharton letter to George Washington.

    Lancaster, PA - 24 October 1777

    In consequence of this application we have ordered out two classes of militia, offering an exemption from their fines to such delinquents of the former classes as can be prevailed upon to join them

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 25 October 1777

    A few months relaxation will, I hope, restore my health and constitution, and enable me still to contribute my feeble efforts, in some mode or other, to the advancement of the cause of freedom in America

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 25 October 1777

    We find, by the destination of the prisoners of General Burgoyne's army to this neighbourhood, a wide and difficult field opens to us. To provide quarters, provisions, fuel, &c., for five or six thousand men, will be no small task.

  • Israel Putnam letter to George Washington.

    Fishkill, NY - 25 October 1777

    By a deserter, and two of our people who escaped from the enemy at Yerplanck's Point, day before yesterday, I am informed that four regiments are gone from New York to reenforce General Howe

  • letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 29 October 1777

    Patrick Henry letter to George Washington... The Regiment of Artillery commanded by Colonel Charles Harrison is yet in this State.

  • Patrick Henry letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 30 October 1777

    Although it seems impossible to enlist Continental recruits here, yet the zeal of our countrymen is great and general in the public cause. I wish some proper exertions of that spirit were wisely directed to the general good.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Fishkill, NY - 2 November 1777

    I understand, from Colonel Morgan, that all the Northern army were marching down on both sides the river, and would probably be to-morrow at New Windsor

  • Israel Putnam letter to George Washington.

    Fishkill, NY - 7 November 1777

    as they are raised only till the 1st of December, the officers and men think it exceeding hard that they should be obliged to make that long march, and their times out soon after they could reach you.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    New Windsor, NY - 10 November 1777

    I am pained, beyond expression, to inform your Excellency that, on my arrival here, I find every thing has been neglected and deranged by General Putnam

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    New Windsor, NY - 12 November 1777

    The enemy appear to have stripped New York very bare. The people there (that is, the Tories) are in a very great fright.

  • Israel Putnam letter to George Washington.

    Fishkill, NY - 14 November 1777

    The inclosed is a copy of a letter from Colonel Hamilton to me, by which you will see that I am positively ordered to send all the Continental troops from here. This letter contains some most unjust and injurious reflections

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Peekskill, NY - 15 November 1777

    The troops now remaining with General Putnam will amount to about the number you intended, though they are not exactly the same. He has detached Colonel Charles Webb's regiment to you.

  • Christopher Greene letter to George Washington.

    Red Bank, NJ - 17 November 1777

    Our fleet here are now moving as fast as possible to Timber Creek. The river is so open to the enemy's shipping, that topsail and other vessels are now passing between Mud Island and Province Island to the Schuylkill, unmolested.

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 23 November 1777

    I have never entertained the smallest idea that General Burgoyne should be permitted to ex change the port of embarkation, or that the least variation of the spirit and letter of the Convention would be indulged to the troops under his command.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Haddonfield, PA - 26 November 1777

    General Lafayette letter to General Washington...I went down to this place since the day before yesterday, in order to be acquainted of all the roads and grounds around the enemy.

  • Kazimierz Pulaski letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 0 December 1777

    I make no doubt but your Excellency is acquainted with the present ineffective state of the cavalry. In this situation it cannot be appropriated to any other service than that of orderlies, or reconnoitering the enemy's lines

  • Patrick Henry letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 6 December 1777

    Inclosed I have the honor to transmit you an ac count of necessaries sent off in nine wagons, for the Virginia regiments in Continental service. The goods have been delivered to Colonel Finnic, the Quarter master

  • Kazimierz Pulaski letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 19 December 1777

    The advantages that would arise from a superiority in cavalry are too obvious to be unnoticed.

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 20 December 1777

    When the enemy left the river, it was my opinion that as many of the troops from the Northern Department should be sent to reenforce the Grand Army under your Excellency's more immediate command

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Valley Forge, PA - 26 December 1777

    I have consulted some of the General Officers who I thought most capable of advising upon the proper steps to take in our present circumstances. They say that they can by no means advise for or against an attack.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Valley Forge, PA - 31 December 1777

    General Lafayette letter to General Washington...I should have much reproached myself the liberty I took of writing to your excellency, if I had believed it could engage you in the trouble of answering that letter.

  • Kazimierz Pulaski letter to George Washington.

    Trenton, NJ - 9 January 1778

    I arrived here yesterday with the cavalry, where I expected to have found forage sufficient to subsist the cavalry, at least for a few days.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Trenton, NJ - 12 January 1778

    Add to this that the men of the Navy are so quartered thro' the Town that it is with the greatest difficulty our men can get covering from the weather, & at best must be billeted with the Jacks scattered thro the Town.

  • Thomas Wharton letter to George Washington.

    Lancaster, PA - 15 January 1778

    how ever it may be in other States, we cannot reasonably expect, in this State, where property is in general very equally divided, that farmers will exert them selves to enlist their neighbours children in the service

  • letter to George Washington.

    Hemingtown - 9 February 1778

    General Lafayette letter to General Washington...I go on very slowly; sometimes drenched by rain, sometimes covered by snow, and not entertaining many handsome thoughts...

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Chatham - 9 February 1778

    I am happy to inform that I have already better than 100 pairs of leather breeches on hand & the remaining Complement for the Regt. is are engaged & will be ready for us shortly

  • William Livingston letter to George Washington.

    Trenton, NJ - 16 February 1778

    It would give me pleasure to consent to let three troops of Jersey horse enter into the Continental service till the opening of the next campaign

  • letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 19 February 1778

    General Lafayette letter to General Washington...Why am I so far from you and what business had the board of war to hurry me through the ice and snow without knowing what I should do, neither what they were doing themselves?

  • letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 20 February 1778

    Patrick Henry letter to George Washington... But there may possibly be some scheme or party forming to your prejudice.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Valley Forge, PA - 2 March 1778

    Nothing can be more painful to me, than the repetition of a request, which is known to be disagreeable to a Commander, to whom America in general, and myself in particular, stand so much indebted.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 5 March 1778

    Patrick Henry letter to George Washington... I am anxious to hear something that will serve to explain the strange affair, which I am now informed is taken up respecting you.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Chatham - 7 March 1778

    Am now to inform that L.t Col.o Blackden has obtained Coats & Waistcoats for the Regt. & Col.o Sheldon has been for some time expecting orders for Recruiting purchasing horses for the Regt.

  • Thomas Wharton letter to George Washington.

    Lancaster, PA - 10 March 1778

    There is not any State on this Continent which has been so oppressed with Continental business as this has been, from the beginning of the present controversy to this hour.

  • John Cadwalader letter to George Washington.

    , MD - 12 March 1778

    Recruiting in this and the next county below succeeds better than I expected. One half of the quota required of each county is, I am well informed, made up, and the remainder will soon be completed.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Hingham - 17 March 1778

    Would not an early attempt upon the city of New York, by part of the Continental troops and the eastern militia, be attended with great probability of success ?

  • Kazimierz Pulaski letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 19 March 1778

    in the language of an old soldier and of a citizen, that, in coming to America, my sole object has been to devote myself entirely to her welfare and glory, in using every exertion in my individual power to secure her freedom.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 25 March 1778

    General Lafayette letter to General Washington...I have received a letter from the board and a resolve of congress, by which you are directed to recall me and the Baron de Kalb...

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 4 April 1778

    While General Burgoyne was at General Schuyler's house, in Albany, he wrote as follows to Lord George Germain, October 20th, 1777, concerning the American troops.

  • John Burgoyne letter to George Washington.

    Cambridge, NY - 4 April 1778

    I should have few greater private gratifications in seeing our melancholy contest at an end, than that of cultivating your friendship.

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 8 April 1778

    Upon reading the first, I took occasion to intimate to Mr. Duer the distressed situation of his friend General Schuyler, as described by the General himself in a late letter of the 15th of March

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 14 April 1778

    Congress, with great concern, perceive that your sensibility is wounded by their resolutions. Placing the firmest confidence in your prudence, abilities, and integrity, they wish to preserve that harmony with you, which is essential to the general we

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    York Town, PA - 18 April 1778

    We have determined to send Gates to Hudson River, where he is to command very largely. But he is to receive instructions, which shall be proper.

  • John Cadwalader letter to George Washington.

    , MD - 27 April 1778

    I always proposed spending the active part of the campaign in camp, but I did not conceive the enemy could possibly take the field till towards the 1st of June

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 27 April 1778

    I am directed, by Congress, to request your Excellency will immediately require all officers, civil as well as military, in the army, who are at present delinquent, to comply with the terms of an act of Congress of the 3d of February last

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 27 April 1778

    Your Excellency is too well acquainted with the integrity of your own heart, and too well assured of the good opinion of your countrymen., to admit any anxious impression from the forgeries of an enemy.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 1 May 1778

    I found, upon my journey home, That there was not the least probability of the enemy's attempting to rescue General Burgoyne and army. I therefore went to New Hampshire, where I tarried about twelve days.

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 3 May 1778

    The present will cover an act of that date for ascertaining the rank and pay annexed to Brevet commissions. Whether this is, or is not, intended to have a retrospective effect, I think is not clearly expressed

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Chatham - 3 May 1778

    I should be wanting in my duty should I omit to mention that our Supply's of every kind have been much retarded for want of money. Capt. Seymour's Troop has been supply'd wholly on Credit...

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 5 May 1778

    Human nature pervades every human breast. A residence at Paris will not exempt men from infirmities of the mind

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    York, NY - 16 May 1778

    Give me leave, dear Sir, to congratulate you on the happy event of our treaty with France being so effectually concluded. Congress have ratified it on their part

  • letter to George Washington.

    Valley Forge, PA - 19 May 1778

    General Lafayette letter to General Washington...Give me leave, now, to present you with some observations delivered to me by many officers in that brigade...

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    York Town, PA - 21 May 1778

    the bulk of us bipeds know well how to balance solid pudding against empty praise. There are other things, my dear Sir, besides virtue, which are their own reward.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    York Town, PA - 27 May 1778

    I have a word to say to you on the subject of promotion, which we have just now finished, or rather unfinished, at least if that matter was before in an unfinished situation.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Worcester, MA - 1 June 1778

    I was honored with your kind favor of the 7th ultimo, on the 19th, accompanying your valuable present, the epaulettes and sword-knot.

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 8 June 1778

    My colleague, Mr. Drayton, having shown me, about a fortnight ago, the draft of a report which he had prepared, stating charges against the General Officers who lately abandoned Ticonderoga, and flattering me with assurances that he would soon offer

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Artillery Park, RI - 15 June 1778

    In all considerable armies in Europe, a General Officer has the command and direction of the artillery, and the preparation of every thing pertaining to the ordnance department

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Yorktown, PA - 18 June 1778

    Yesterday there was an extraordinary motion on our floor for calling upon members to lay before Congress such letters as they had received from the Commissioners, or other persons, meaning persons in Great Britain, on political subjects.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 June 1778

    Fifty volunteers have engaged to go with General Cadwalader, who this minute informs me he expects to collect a considerable number more in the morning

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Peekskill, NY - 25 June 1778

    To prevent the enemy's army, now marching across the Jerseys, from receiving any considerable reenforcement from the troops in and near New York, I propose moving the main body of this army to the White Plains

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Allentown, PA - 26 June 1778

    We have halted the troops at this place. The enemy, by our last reports, were four miles from this (that is, their rear), and had passed the road which turns off towards South Amboy, which determines their route towards Shrewsbury.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    , NJ - 28 June 1778

    The result of what I have seen and heard concerning the enemy is, that they have encamped with their van a little beyond Monmouth Court-House, and their rear at Manalapan's River, about seven miles from this place.

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 July 1778

    my hearty congratulations with my countrymen on the success of the American arms, under your Excellency's immediate command, in the late battle of Momnouth,

  • Charles Hector letter to George Washington.

    At Sea - 8 July 1778

    I have the honor of imparting to your Excellency the arrival of the King's fleet, charged by his Majesty with the glorious task of giving his allies, the United States of America, the most striking proofs of his affection.

  • Charles Hector letter to George Washington.

    Sandy Hook, NJ - 13 July 1778

    The desire of communicating speedily with your Excellency determines me to make a debarkation on the coast of Jersey, in a village which, according to the map, is to the northward of the river Shrewsbury.

  • Charles Hector letter to George Washington.

    Sandy Hook, NJ - 17 July 1778

    The bar of the River Shrewsbury, the officer, sailors, and boats that I have lost in the waves, have not hindered Colonel Laurens from braving them twice, to come and deliver me himself the letter that you did me the honor to write

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 July 1778

    Prizes are finding the way into the Delaware. One, laden with rum, limes, &c., intended for the enemy's refreshment, embraced one of our wharves the evening before last, and I learn a rich ship is on her way up.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Black Point, NJ - 20 July 1778

    Inclosed I transmit your Excellency a letter from Count D Estaing. He has had the river sounded, and finds he cannot enter. He will sail for Rhode Island to-morrow evening

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Camp At The Plains - 21 July 1778

    Your Excellency has made me very unhappy. I can submit very patiently to deserved censure ; but it wounds my feelings exceedingly to meet with a rebuke for doing what I conceived to be a proper part of my duty, and in the order of things.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Newark, NJ - 23 July 1778

    The Count had received his expected despatches from Congress, and was to sail, as I mentioned before, the first fair wind.

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 24 July 1778

    I have already ordered out one fourth part of the militia of Orange and Ulster to the western frontier of those counties, who will amount to near six hundred men

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 25 July 1778

    General Sullivan estimates the enemy's land force here at seven thousand. The state of their shipping, he informs me, is as follows...

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 August 1778

    I was in your debt. It is my fate always to be so with my friends. But, believe me, my heart owes nothing.

  • Charles Hector letter to George Washington.

    At Sea - 3 August 1778

    General Sullivan has done me the honor to come and see me, and to communicate his views. I will second them with all my power. He is full of that spirit of activity and combination, with which you inspire

  • letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 6 August 1778

    General Lafayette letter to General Washington...I willingly part with the half of my detachment, though I had a great dependence upon them, as you find it convenient to the good of the service.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 13 August 1778

    Should the enemy come out to attack us, our dependence must be upon the superiority of our numbers and the point of the bayonet. How our militia may behave on such an occasion, I am unable to determine.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 23 August 1778

    It seems that the Captains of the French fleet are so incensed at the Count D Estaing's being put over them, he being but a land officer, that they are determined to prevent his doing any thing that may redound to his credit or our advantage.

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 23 August 1778

    General Sullivan will inform your Excellency of the fatal determination of the Count's officers in a Council of War, as well as of the several remonstrances, and final solemn protest, made by the American Generals.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 28 August 1778

    In my last I communicated to your Excellency the departure of the Count D Estaing with his fleet, for Boston. This disagreeable event has, as I apprehend, ruined all our operations.

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 August 1778

    This morning, upon inquiry, I was confirmed in my belief that the former Camp Committee had made no application to Congress for gold or silver, to be deposited in your Excellency's hands for public uses

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 2 September 1778

    The movements which your Excellency has observed at New York, the arrival of seventy sail of vessels in the road of Newport, the appearance of twenty sail off Boston, are circumstances which keep us in suspense

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 3 September 1778

    I found means to restore the former harmony between the American and French officers of the army. The Count D Estaing and myself are in the same friendship as heretofore. The reason of the protest has been explained to him

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 16 September 1778

    The growing extravagance of the people, and the increasing demand for the article of forage in this quarter, have become a very alarming affair. Hay is from sixty to eighty dollars a ton, and upon the rise.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Roundhill - 23 September 1778

    The Scarcity of forage in this Department has induced Col.o Sheldon to order an assortment of the Horses belonging to this Regt. that those which in all probability will never be fit for the Dragoon Service again may be put to some other service...

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Danbury - 30 September 1778

    I am sorry for the disgrace we have suffered in the Jerseys; but imagine that the enemy take ad vantage of the supine ness that constantly seizes our people, when they have been long unmolested.

  • Charles Hector letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 0 October 1778

    Those who have the happiness to be under your Excellency's orders, find in you a father. The Marquis de la Fayette has a superior title to your Excellency's affection ; he respects, admires, and loves you.

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 October 1778

    description

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 October 1778

    in removing my desks and their contents from one part of the house to a more convenient, I have mislaid among my private papers, and, after as much search at different times, and particularly this morning

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 October 1778

    The conduct, which the enemy may pursue, with relation to us, is not quite decided. But I have not a doubt, that their efforts during the next campaign will be chiefly towards our frontiers, with a view to weary us into submission.

  • Aaron Burr letter to George Washington.

    Elizabethtown, PA - 28 October 1778

    The excessive heat and occasional fatigues of the preceding campaign, have so impaired my health and constitution as to render me incapable of immediate service.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Bedford, CT - 19 November 1778

    I have been hourly waiting, for more then two Days, for a letter from Culper, & I am confident the failure must be attributed to those employed in crossing the sound...

  • Henry Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 November 1778

    I believe, and upon good ground, the scheme for an expedition into Canada, in concert with the arms of France, originated in the breast of the Marquis De Lafayette, encouraged, probably, by conferences with Count D Estaing

  • John Cadwalader letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 December 1778

    It is no small mortification to me, that, by not entering early into the service, I lost the opportunity of sharing the honors which many officers have gained by serving under your command.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 19 December 1778

    The troops have been supplied by this State ; and the heads of the several departments of Medical, Commissary, and Quarter-master, when supplies were necessary, have applied to the civil authority

  • William Livingston letter to George Washington.

    Elizabethtown, NJ - 21 December 1778

    I am happy to find your Excellency concur with me in sentiment respecting the prisoners lately be longing to the British ship, stranded on our coast

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Purysburg, SC - 5 January 1779

    On the evening of the 25th ultimo, I received information at Charleston, that the enemy had arrived, with upwards of twenty ships, at Tybee, near the mouth of the River Savannah, and in a harbour south of the river.

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 4 March 1779

    I am sorry to find your Excellency seems to have given over all thoughts of penetrating into Canada by the route of Coos

  • Aaron Burr letter to George Washington.

    Phillipsburgh, PA - 10 March 1779

    I find my health unequal to the undertaking, and have acquainted him of my intentions to retire. He has ordered an officer to relieve me before the 15th of March...

  • Patrick Henry letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 13 March 1779

    My last accounts from the South are unfavorable. Georgia is said to be in full possession of the enemy, and South Carolina in great danger. The number of disaffected there is said to be formidable, and the Creek Indians inclining against us.

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 18 March 1779

    The Legislature, before they adjourned, empowered me to embody one thousand men for the defence of the northern and western frontiers, or such other service as I should judge proper to employ them in.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Mill Stone, NJ - 16 April 1779

    The variety of reasons, which I urged yesterday, for passing with the main body up the Mohawk River, and down by Wood Creek to the Cayuga Lake, still have their weight in my mind

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Fairfield, CT - 20 April 1779

    Agreeable to your Excellency's Instructions, I have forwarded the Vial delivd. me, & all the Directions for C.s future Conduct.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 April 1779

    I was sure of your politeness, but not certain of a more than usual degree of confidence. The latter has now been made manifest, and, permit me to assure you, it shall be mutual.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 April 1779

    I am happy to find you have wrote so fully to Congress, upon the disagreeable consequences that may follow from starving the Quarter master's department at this critical season.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 April 1779

    Most certain, my inclination leads me to a resignation. My reputation I value more than any advantages of gain ; and I consider it in great danger.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 April 1779

    While the maritime affairs of the Continent continue under the direction of a Committee, they will be exposed to all the consequences of want of system, attention, and knowledge.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 May 1779

    If your Excellency thinks me criminal, for Heaven's sake let me be immediately tried, and, if found guilty, executed. I want no favor ; I ask only for justice.

  • Israel Putnam letter to George Washington.

    Reading, MA - 7 May 1779

    I am now taking the earliest opportunity to acquaint your Excellency with my arrival in camp, to resume the command of my division.

  • William Livingston letter to George Washington.

    Trenton, NJ - 8 May 1779

    the militia of the country should be drawn out by the authority of the Government, rather than by the pecuniary reward attached to their service.

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 18 May 1779

    I was called by an alarm on the frontiers of Ulster county, occasioned by the appearance of about one hundred Indians and Tories, at Shendeacon, a small settlement in the gorge of the mountains, about twenty miles west of Kingston

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Durham, CT - 26 May 1779

    I have the Honour of enclosing to your Excellency a Return of the British Qt. Infantry, previous to their leaving the E. End of Long Island

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Hartford, CT - 29 May 1779

    I suppose your Excellency is not wholly unacquainted with the character of Mr. David Bushnell, the bearer. He has had a liberal education, and discovers a genius capable of great improvement

  • Arthur St. Clair letter to George Washington.

    Pompton, NJ - 3 June 1779

    Colonel Burr arrived here about three o clock, from General McDougall, and brings intelligence of the surrender of the Fort upon Verplank's Point, yesterday, about eleven o clock, by capitulation.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 23 June 1779

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I have the pleasure to enclose you the particulars of Colonel Clarke's success against St. Vincennes...

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Pittsburgh, PA - 10 July 1779

    An expedition against Detroit, in the winter season, will doubtless put us in possession of the enemy's shipping, and, of course, give us the command of Lake Erie.

  • Joseph Reed letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 July 1779

    though it was and is the universal opinion, that the number of men under General Sullivan is greater than can be fed, when he proceeds a little further on the expedition, yet we gave early and peremptory orders to the companies of rangers to join him

  • letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 17 July 1779

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I some time ago enclosed to you a printed copy of an order of Council, by which Governor Hamilton was to be confined in irons, in close jail...

  • letter to George Washington.

    Stoney Point, NY - 17 July 1779

    Anthony Wayne letter to George Washington... Official Report of the Capture of Stony Point

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Bald Hill, NY - 18 July 1779

    On my arrival, I found General Howe had sent off his cannon, and his division was filing off towards the Highlands. The enemy appeared to be advancing in force near the New Bridge.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Mandevilles, NY - 19 July 1779

    By intelligence received since I had the honor to write in the morning, I learn that the enemy's advanced sentinels and videttes were posted, the last night, on the New Bridge.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Ridgfield, CT - 25 July 1779

    enclosed is a Scheme for carrying on the Correspondence in future with C

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Granfield, CT - 28 July 1779

    Webb was handed me yesterday - The phials therein Previous to which I had sent refered to came duly to hand.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Ridgfield, CT - 11 August 1779

    I am extremely anxious to have the men properly armed, for which purpose the Capt. Edgar who will Commd them goes with this letter to Hd Qrs to receive your Excellency's further directions

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 August 1779

    Britain refused the mediation of Spain at a time when their spirits were elated by their successes in the West Indies and the Southern States, and by the accounts they received of discord in Congress

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Canaan, CT - 30 September 1779

    I furnished the officers with Recruiting orders agreeable to the tenor of your own.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 1 October 1779

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... On receipt of your letter of August 6th, during my absence, the Council had the irons taken off the prisoners of war.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 2 October 1779

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... Just as the letter accompanying this was going off, Colonel Mathews arrived on parole from New York, by the way of headquarters, bringing your Excellency's letter...

  • letter to George Washington.

    Havre, FRA - 7 October 1779

    General Lafayette letter to General Washington...Not a line from you, my dear, general, has yet arrived into my hands, and though several ships from America...

  • letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 8 October 1779

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... The advice of Council to allow the enlargement of prisoners, on their giving a proper parole, has not been recalled...

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 October 1779

    The only satisfaction I promise myself from this appointment, will flow from the rectitude with which the duties of it will be discharged, and not from a prospect of general approbation.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Hartford, CT - 5 November 1779

    The keeping up large guards of the militia on the coasts, besides the enormous expense attending, injures the public service by withdrawing the men from the field, and lessening our ability to supply the army with men or provisions.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Sufferns Tavern, NY - 6 November 1779

    I find that the whole of the Rhode Island army is encamped on Staten Island, in addition to the troops before stationed there

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Sufferns Tavern, NY - 6 November 1779

    I am sorry to inform your Excellency, that I am under the painful necessity of leaving a service to which I am, by principle and interest, attached ; and, among the variety of mortifications I must suffer in quitting it

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 7 November 1779

    We remain unsupported by troops, unsupplied with many essential articles, and uncovered with works ; and, what adds to the unhappiness, is the little prospect that our affairs will speedily be in a better channel.

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 8 November 1779

    Thursday night I had the honor to receive your Excellency's letter of the 1st instant, and immediately gave orders for moving the Continental troops over the bay to Greenwich

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    West Point, NY - 14 November 1779

    Your Excellency undoubtedly has frequently had under consideration a proper position for winter-quarters. It is not always in the power of a General to take a position most favorable to his wishes

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Hartford, CT - 15 November 1779

    In obedience to the orders contained in your Excellency's letters of the 1st and 2d instant, I marched the whole of the Continental troops from the State of Rhode Island, and arrived yesterday morning

  • Joseph Reed letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 November 1779

    we never exhibited any other charge against General Arnold to Congress, than that of appropriating the public wagons of the State to private uses

  • letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 28 November 1779

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... Your Excellency's letter on the discriminations which have been heretofore made, between the troops raised within this state, ... was delivered me four days ago.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Pompton, NJ - 1 December 1779

    Perhaps there was never more justice in any ad vice than that given by the philosopher to his prince, namely, "Always beware of the man that flatters you, and appears to coincide with your sentiments on all occasions."

  • letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 10 December 1779

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I take the liberty of putting under cover to your Excellency some letters to Generals Phillips and Reidesel...

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Morristown, NJ - 0 January 1780

    I have repeatedly mentioned to your Excellency, for some months past, that the supplies of money furnished the department were very unequal to the current expenses.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 8 January 1780

    I hear, but have no official notice of it, that the Virginia line are ordered from the main army, to reenforce this department. If this should prove true, it will be fortunate indeed for this country

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 23 January 1780

    I had, a few days since, the honor of your favor of the 12th ultimo, by Colonel Laurens, announcing that the Virginia line were ordered to this department, than which nothing could be more acceptable, saving that of their not being needed.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Morristown, NJ - 7 February 1780

    The inclosed copy of a representation from Colonel Barry, an Assistant Deputy-Quartermaster-General in this State, will show your Excellency that a new difficulty has arisen to delay transportation.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 10 February 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... It is possible you may have heard, that in the course of last summer an expedition was meditated, by our Colonel Clarke, against Detroit...

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 11 February 1780

    neither have I seen the Deputy Quartermaster-General since last March. I have not a tent for my men, and, by the inclosed return, you will see that the provisions are scanty ; but I hope to be better supplied in the spring.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 12 February 1780

    I have received information that, on the 3d instant, the enemy landed about eight thousand troops, commanded by Sir Henry Clinton.

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 14 February 1780

    The day before yesterday, we had certain intelligence of the arrival of forty-five sail at North Edisto. A debarkation immediately commenced on Shnmons's Island; and an advanced corps, it is said, of five hundred, proceeded the following day

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Highlands, NY - 17 February 1780

    In the following I shall give your Excellency a state of facts relative to the late capture of Lieutenant-Colonel Thompson and part of his detachment, on the lines of this post, on the 3d instant.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 4 March 1780

    Sir Harry seems to be collecting his force on James's Island, and is there throwing up some works ; one among the ruins of Fort Johnson, another a little to the westward of it.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 March 1780

    From the injury I have received in my leg, and the great stiffness in my ankle, my surgeons are of opinion it will not be prudent for me to take a command in the army for some time to come.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 March 1780

    I do not mean, Sir, to convey the most distant idea, that I solicit a restoration to the rank and place I held in the army

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Morristown, NJ - 6 March 1780

    Inclosed I send your Excellency a copy of my last letter to Congress, to which they have given no answer, and which necessarily involves very important consequences.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 March 1780

    I believe it will be necessary for General Greene to address Congress very pointedly on the subject of the wagoners, as I find a disposition in many to have them drawn from the army.

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 14 March 1780

    The enemy's present disposition of his force, and all his late operations, indicate a design to attack Charleston by a siege in form. To complete the in vestiture, he must introduce his ships of war into the harbour.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Amboy, NJ - 17 March 1780

    The enemy are still in the dark about their fleet and army gone that way, as we gather from the Commissioners. They pretend to have little European news, though a vessel arrived two or three days since from England

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 18 March 1780

    The savages have already begun their hostilities. Last Sunday, they killed five men at a sugar camp upon Raccoon Creek, in Youghiogany county, and took prisoners three girls and three lads.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 24 March 1780

    Since my last, the enemy have, very unexpectedly, brought over the ships mentioned in the inclosed paper. It has been thought there was not water enough for a sixty-four gun ship.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 March 1780

    Many people are apprehensive for the fall of Charleston ; and I think it in jeopardy, as well as the troops under Lincoln's command. I am more anxious for the fate of the troops than the city.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 April 1780

    There would be no difficulty, either in the one case or the other, could the treasury furnish the proper supplies of cash. But in its present exhausted state, with the enormous demands upon the department, the agents have neither credit nor influence

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 April 1780

    I have entreated General Greene to remain a day or two longer in town, that I may be able to advise with him on the measures necessary to be pursued to prevent the ill consequences of his being driven to the necessity of a resignation

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 9 April 1780

    The enemy crossed the Ashley, in force, near the ferry, on the 29th ultimo, and the next day moved down, and encamped about three thousand .yards from our lines.

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 24 April 1780

    I received the act of Congress respecting the troops proposed to be raised for the defence of our frontiers. Some considerable time will necessarily elapse before they can be embodied

  • letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 27 April 1780

    General Lafayette letter to General Washington...I have affairs of the utmost importance which I should at first communicate to you alone.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Roxbury, MA - 30 April 1780

    Several officers have already come from West Point on the recruiting service, and others are on the road. I wish they may be successful, but am at a loss, from the tenor of your Excellency's letter, to determine what bounty the recruits, raised by th

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 13 May 1780

    Several persons have lately been killed and wounded in Westmoreland county, which will probably prevent my receiving any aid from the militia of that county.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Morristown, NJ - 23 May 1780

    I have had a long conversation with General Schuyler this morning, and have seen the powers and appointments upon the present business intrusted to the direction of the Committee, as well as their powers to act under.

  • Israel Putnam letter to George Washington.

    Pomfret, CT - 29 May 1780

    After I was prevented from coming on to the army, by a stroke of the paralytic kind, which deprived me, in a great measure, of the use of my right leg and arm, I retired to my plantation, and have been gradually growing better ever since.

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 30 May 1780

    Since my last, ten persons have been killed and wounded, taken by the Indians in Westmoreland county. Parties of regulars and militia have endeavoured to overtake them, but without success.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Roxbury, MA - 31 May 1780

    I have been endeavouring to obtain intelligence of the situation of the enemy at Halifax, &c. I learn that their naval force, not long since, consisted of one ship of seventy-four guns, one of twenty, one sloop of war, and two or three privateers.

  • Joseph Reed letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 June 1780

    I do not know by what means the expected assistance from France has been procured; but it will certainly give a complexion to the alliance in future, according to the reception it meets with here.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 8 June 1780

    I have seen the enemy. Those in view I calculate at about three thousand. There may be, and probably are, enough others out of sight.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 11 June 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... Major Galvan, as recommended by your Excellency, was despatched to his station without delay, and has been furnished with every thing he desired, as far as we were able.

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Kingston, NY - 13 June 1780

    I am apprehensive that the other three regiments (they having, previous to the receipt of your Excellency's order, marched to the respective stations mentioned in my brother's letter) will not be able to reach West Point on as early a day as might ha

  • Joseph Reed letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 June 1780

    I have received your favor of the 16th instant, directing the march of the city light-horse, for which the necessary orders will be given, and they will proceed with all possible despatch.

  • Robert Livingston letter to George Washington.

    Trenton, NJ - 22 June 1780

    My anxiety for the supplies of the army has brought me to this place, in order that I might satisfy myself as to the quantity on hand, and the means of forwarding them.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Bryants Tavern, PA - 23 June 1780

    I now acquaint you that they proceeded, with vigor, until they had gained Connecticut Farms ; they then were checked by Colonel Dayton's regiment.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Springfield, PA - 24 June 1780

    the whole force of the enemy, which has been in Jersey, went from Elizabethtown Point between twelve and one o'clock this morning.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 2 July 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I have received from the Committee of Congress, at headquarters, three letters calling for aids of men and provisions.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 12 July 1780

    I arrived here the last night, and this morning had the honor of congratulating Monsieur le Compte De Rochambeau, and Monsieur le Chevalier De Ternay, on their safe arrival in this harbour.

  • John Stark letter to George Washington.

    Exeter, NH - 13 July 1780

    Very much fatigued, I arrived in New Hampshire in seven days from the time I left you, and am very happy to acquaint you that the people of New Hampshire behave with the greatest spirit.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 16 July 1780

    The French troops are landed, and encamped in a fine situation, to the south-east of the town, and extend nearly across the Island.

  • Joseph Jones letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 July 1780

    A report from the Board of War, in consequence of a letter of General Gates's to Congress, referred to the Board, respecting the promotion of Colonel Daniel Morgan to the office of Brigadier-General, now lies upon the table

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Bedford, CT - 18 July 1780

    The Enemy are very busy collecting forage wood &c from L.I. A fleet of 40 Sail are constantly passing & repassing the Sound transporting those supplies

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 21 July 1780

    A few days ago I received intelligence, that a party, consisting of thirty odd Wyandot Indians, had crossed the Ohio River, five miles below Fort Mcintosh, and had hid thirteen small bark canoes upon our shore.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 21 July 1780

    This afternoon, fifteen or sixteen British ships of war have made their appearance off this harbour, to the eastward of Block Island. More than half of them, I think, are ships of the line.

  • Antony Wayne letter to George Washington.

    New Bridge - 21 July 1780

    Being convinced that our field-pieces were too light to make the wished impression on the block-house by Bull's Ferry, from an experience of more than an hour (at no greater distance than from fifty to seventy yards)...

  • Jean Baptiste De Vimeur letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 22 July 1780

    The enemy are doing what they ought to do. Graves, immediately after having joined Arbuthnot, comes to cruise before us with nine or ten ships of the line, five frigates, and four other small vessels.

  • Antony Wayne letter to George Washington.

    Totowa, NJ - 22 July 1780

    On reconnoitring the refugee post, near Bull's Ferry, we found it to consist of a block-house, surrounded by an abatis and stockade to the perpendicular rocks next to the North River, with a kind of ditch, or parapet, serving as a covered way.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Veals Ford, CT - 22 July 1780

    I have just recd the Enclosed from the C's which I have the honour to enclose to your Excellency, & forward by express to Gen.l Howe.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 25 July 1780

    Their intention, undoubtedly, is to block up the squadron under the command of Monsieur De Ternay, intercept the expected second division of our allies, cut off all supplies by water

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 25 July 1780

    This afternoon the intelligence, contained in the inclosed, came to hand; upon which General Rochambeau immediately made a requisition for two thousand militia.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 26 July 1780

    By a variety of intelligence, from various quarters (all which agree) the enemy intend to make an attempt on the fleet and army of our great and good ally at this place.

  • Chevalier De La Luzerne letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 July 1780

    Congress have put under your orders the frigates, in directing them to come into the Delaware.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 31 July 1780

    The Count wishes to detain the three months men a few days, to secure the pass at Howland's Ferry.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Verplancks Point, NY - 3 August 1780

    To explain the reasons for the movement will give the army a high opinion of the confidence you have in their spirit and enterprise, and perfectly reconcile them to all the past fatigues, and to those which may follow

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Verplancks Point, NY - 5 August 1780

    I am sensible my conduct has been viewed by many in a very improper light; and I am persuaded many think the business can be done with more method, and at a less expense, than it has been.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Robinsons House, NY - 6 August 1780

    On my arrival at this post, I found every thing thrown into great confusion, by the troops removing from hence, and the militia coming in.

  • Joseph Jones letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 August 1780

    I have my hopes we shall yet be able to do somefhing important upon the arrival of the French reenforcement, as I presume their fleet will then command the water, without which, I confess, I have no sanguine expectations.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Robinsons House, NY - 8 August 1780

    I wish your Excellency would be kind enough to order Mr. Erskine to send me a map of the country from this place to New York, particularly on the east side of the river, which would be very useful to me.

  • Chevalier De Ternay letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 8 August 1780

    It would be very difficult for me to fix a point for my junction with the squadron, which was to follow me when I left the ports of France. I am absolutely ignorant of its force, and the part of America where it ought to make the land.

  • Chevalier De Ternay letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 10 August 1780

    I have received the letter, which your Excellency has done me the honor to write, the 6th of this month, on the subject of the American frigates which may join the squadron of the King of France.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 11 August 1780

    I propose to meet General Phillips at Elizabethtown, on the 12th of next month. If your Excellency's permission is necessary, for him to meet me at that place, I wish it might be sent to him.

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 August 1780

    You will doubtless, ere this reaches you, have been informed that Congress have been pleased to appoint me Quartermaster-General.

  • John Rutledge letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 August 1780

    I cannot forbear representing, that the state of South Carolina and Georgia is such as demonstrates the absolute necessity of expelling the enemy from those countries, as speedily as possible

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Hillsborough - 30 August 1780

    By the firmness and bravery of the Continental troops, the victory is for from bloodless on the part of the foe they having upwards of five hundred men, with officers in proportion, killed and wounded.

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Hillsborough - 3 September 1780

    If I can yet render good service to the United States, it will be necessary it should be seen that I have the support of Congress and your Excellency ; otherwise some men may think they please my superiors by blaming me

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 5 September 1780

    Yesterday, the Indians killed two men, of the frontier inhabitants, on Robeson's Run, in this county (Yougluogania), and fired at two soldiers who were taking some stores in a canoe from hence to Fort Henry.

  • Joseph Jones letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 September 1780

    I have received jour favor of The 10th ultimo, upon the subject of a report respecting a certain gentleman, and thank you for the freedom and candid manner of your communications.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 8 September 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... As I know the anxieties you must have felt, since the late misfortune to the South, ... I take the liberty of enclosing you a statement of this unlucky affair...

  • letter to George Washington.

    Steenropia - 10 September 1780

    Anthony Wayne letter to George Washington... I find the numbers rather in favor of the Enemy...

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 11 September 1780

    I came here this morning, in order to establish signals, to be observed in case the enemy came up the river ; to give some directions respecting the guard-boats ; and to have a beacon fixed upon the mountain

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Robinsons House, NY - 12 September 1780

    The order, contained in the postscript of your Excellency's letter of the 7th, to send the eight bargemen of Colonel Putnam's regiment to join their regiment, I conceive to be on a supposition of their being idle at West Point.

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 14 September 1780

    The French inhabitants at Detroit are much in our interest, and wish most heartily to see an American force approaching. I really believe that twelve hundred well-appointed men would carry that place without great difficulty

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Robinsons House, NY - 14 September 1780

    I am, therefore, of opinion, that the Pennsylvania line, which I suppose to amount to twenty-five hundred or three thousand men, should hold themselves in readiness to march

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Robinsons House, NY - 16 September 1780

    My answers to the questions proposed by your Excellency to the Council of War I will do myself the honor to deliver in person.

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 17 September 1780

    I have this moment received intelligence, that the enemy from Detroit intend paying a visit to this frontier.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 23 September 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washinton... I yesterday forwarded to you a letter from Colonel Wood, informing you of his situation.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 25 September 1780

    The prisoners, pained with regret, are become sore; their minds are soured, and their friends and connections think them neglected by the public. This may prevent the recruiting our battalions, and cause a disrelish for the service.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 26 September 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... The enclosed copy of a letter from Lord Cornwallis to Colonel Balfour, was sent me by Governor Rutledge...

  • Joseph Jones letter to George Washington.

    , VA - 2 October 1780

    Congress having taken some steps towards completing the Federal Union, which I anxiously wish to accomplish, induced me to be here early in the session

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 October 1780

    description

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 5 October 1780

    A new disposition of the army going to be made, and an officer appointed to the command of West Point and the district on the east side of the North River, I take the liberty just to intimate my inclinations for the appointment.

  • Arthur St. Clair letter to George Washington.

    West Point, NY - 7 October 1780

    The laying in a proper stock of fire-wood is a very heavy, but a very essential business, and the militia, which have been employed in cutting it, I am told, have done little more than supply the post at Fishkill

  • James Duane letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 October 1780

    Before this reaches jour hands, you will have received the new arrangement of the army. Submitted, as it is, to your opinion, it is only to be considered as an essay, open to such alterations as you may suggest.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    West Point, NY - 16 October 1780

    Your Excellency's letter of the 14th, appointing me to the command of the Southern army, was delivered me last evening.

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 17 October 1780

    The Delaware Chiefs, with upwards of thirty warriors, are come to aid me upon an expedition ; but, as I have neither bread nor meat to give them, they will soon discover that it is not in my power to act offensively.

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 18 October 1780

    Upon my arrival, I found the main body of the enemy, which appeared in the northward, had returned by the way of Lake George ; and that part of the country seemed again to be in a state of tranquillity.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    West Point, NY - 19 October 1780

    I had given over the thoughts of going home, even if I obtained your permission, before I received your pleasure upon the subject. My affairs require it ; but I am fully convinced that the time it will take, and the state of the Southern department

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 22 October 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I have this morning received certain information of the arrival of a hostile fleet in our bay, of about sixty sail.

  • Friedrich Steuben letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 October 1780

    It is with the greatest satisfaction I acquaint you that the plan of arrangement for the army, which your Excellency sent to Congress, has been agreed upon yesterday, without any alteration.

  • Henry Clinton letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 23 October 1780

    I must always consider an extract from a letter as a partial, and not always a candid description of a correspondence

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 25 October 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... By this express I hand on, from General Gates to Congress, intelligence of the capture of Augusta, in Georgia...

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 26 October 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington...The Executive of this State think it expedient, under our present circumstances, that the prisoners of war under the Convention of Saratoga, be removed from their present situation.

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 30 October 1780

    On my arrival at Schenectady, I was advised that the different parties of the enemy at Schoharie and Ballstown, had left those places ; the former moving towards the Mohawk River, and the latter shaping their course towards Sacondaga.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 October 1780

    On my arrival at this place, I laid your Excellency's letter before Congress, and addressed them on the business of the Southern department.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 3 November 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... Since I had the honor of writing to your Excellency, on the 25th ultimo, the enemy have withdrawn their forces from the north side of James river...

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 November 1780

    The arms we are likely to get from the Board of War and this State fall far short of my expectations. The whole will not exceed fifteen hundred.

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 9 November 1780

    On the night of the 1st instant, the enemy broke ground, and have been working slowly ever since. I scarcely know how to denominate what they have executed hitherto.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 10 November 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I enclose your Excellency a copy of an intercepted letter from Major General Leslie to Lord Cornwallis.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 November 1780

    The army is arranged, I hope, agreeably to your Excellency's wish. The officers have half-pay for life

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    , NY - 13 November 1780

    How far the sending of the Pennsylvanians towards Aquakanac, and going ourselves to the Hackensac position, may awaken the enemy, I cannot pretend to say.

  • Jean Baptiste De Vimeur letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 14 November 1780

    If your Excellency does not find a moment to come and see this part of your army, I am afraid that the whole of it will desert, so great is their desire to see their General.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 19 November 1780

    Your weight and influence, both with Congress and this State, in support of the southern operations, will be exceedingly important and necessary to my success.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 22 November 1780

    Some time last fall, when I spoke to your excellency about going to the southward, I explained to you candidly my feelings with respect to military reputation, and how much it was my object to act a conspicuous part in some enterprise

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 24 November 1780

    As no reenforcement can be had from your Excellency, the intended expedition against Detroit must be laid aside until a favorable turn of affairs takes place, unless you would recommend a junction of Colonel Clark's troops with mine.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Fairfield, CT - 24 November 1780

    I take this earliest opportunity to inform your Excellency that I have returned from Long Island with the Troops ordered for my command.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Fairfield, CT - 25 November 1780

    The Enemies loss was 7 killed & wounded, the most most of the latter mortally. The surprise was so compleat that before they could rally they were all Prisoners.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 26 November 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I am to apprize your Excellency, that the officers of every rank, both British and German ... have purchased within this State some of the finest horses in it.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paramus, NJ - 28 November 1780

    Unless, however, you were to cast your eye on a man who, I think, would suit better than any other in the world. Hamilton is, I confess, the officer whom I should like to see in that station.

  • John Stark letter to George Washington.

    West Point, NY - 30 November 1780

    The impaired state of my health and the situation of my family, together with the unsettled state of my accounts with New Hampshire, render my presence there, the ensuing winter, very necessary.

  • Chevalier De La Luzerne letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 December 1780

    I flattered myself that the clothing, destined for the army under the command of your Excellency, had at length arrived in the river, in the vessel of Paul Jones, or in one of those coming under his convoy

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Camp Charlotte, SC - 7 December 1780

    Immediately I called a Council, respecting the practicability of holding a Council of Inquiry upon General Gates's conduct, during his command in this department.

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 7 December 1780

    I have, for a long time past, had two parties in the country, commanded by Field-Officers, to impress cattle, and yet the troops are frequently without meat for several days together.

  • James Duane letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 December 1780

    Government, instead of possessing the confidence and the dignity necessary to enforce its counsels, is surrounded bv clamorous creditors and insidious speculators

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 15 December 1780

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I had the honor of writing to your Excellency on the subject of an expedition contemplated by this State, against the British post at Detroit...

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 25 December 1780

    No measure has been left untried to save the question for filling up our battalions for the war

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Cheraw, SC - 28 December 1780

    I was apprehensive, on my first arrival, that the country around Charlotte was too much exhausted to afford subsistence for the army at that place for any considerable time.

  • John Rutledge letter to George Washington.

    Pedee River, SC - 28 December 1780

    I fear that the effects of the enemy's possessing the two southernmost States much longer, will be altogether ruinous to many individuals (some of whom are already reduced to the greatest misery and distress), and injurious to the common cause.

  • Antony Wayne letter to George Washington.

    Mount Kemble, NJ - 2 January 1781

    The most general and unhappy mutiny suddenly took place in the Pennsylvania line, about nine o'clock last night. It yet subsists.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    West Point, NY - 6 January 1781

    As to burning the houses at Morrisania, although they are a nest for the nefarious enemy, yet, as many of them belong to persons friendly to our cause, who have been obliged to abandon their habitations, it may not only be impolitic but injurious to

  • Arthur St. Clair letter to George Washington.

    Morristown, NJ - 7 January 1781

    Your Excellency has heard of the shameful defection of the Pennsylvania line; and I am very much concerned to inform you that, as yet, there is no prospect, that we know of, of any desire appearing in them to return to their duty.

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Trenton, NJ - 7 January 1781

    The Committee appointed by Congress to quiet the disturbances of the Pennsylvania line, &c., think it proper to inform your Excellency that they arrived at this place last night, after dark

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 10 January 1781

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... We immediately despatched General Nelson to the lower country, with powers to call on the militia in that quarter, or act otherwise as exigencies should require...

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Trenton, NJ - 10 January 1781

    We are happy to inform your Excellency, that the terms offered to the Pennsylvania troops are at length finally, and, as we believe, cordially and satisfactorily, agreed on ; and, to-morrow, we expect the Pennsylvania line will be arranged in its for

  • Friedrich Steuben letter to George Washington.

    Camp Near Hoods - 11 January 1781

    The enemy, lying still at Westover on the 9th, and some vessels which had lain at the mouth of the Appamatox, dropping down that day to their fleet, I thought it evident they had no design against Petersburg

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Pedee, SC - 13 January 1781

    This country is so extensive, and supplies are so difficult to obtain, that it is impossible to carry on the war any length of time with the militia.

  • Thomas Chittenden letter to George Washington.

    Arlington, VT - 15 January 1781

    I am exceedingly unhappy when I view the critical situation of the interest of the United States, and the great evils which attend the people in this quarter by the unhappy internal broils and contentions, caused by the disputes

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 21 January 1781

    and most sincerely sympathize with you on the embarrassments which the disagreeable event in Jersey will occasion you. It is an awful lesson to the States

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Pedee, SC - 24 January 1781

    My public letter will inform your Excellency of the success of the troops under the command of General Morgan. The event is glorious ; and I am exceedingly unhappy that our wretched condition will not permit our improving it to the best advantage.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 25 January 1781

    I am informed that Congress have acceded to a general exchange, and that it is left with your Excellency to carry it into effect, at such time as you shall think proper.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Pedee, SC - 28 January 1781

    Lord Cornwallis continued at Weymsborough, making every preparation, and completely equipping his troops for the most active operations, until the 9th instant

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 4 February 1781

    Upon my arrival here the 25th ultimio, I found that men and money were still wanting to fit the Alliance frigate for sea. I immediately insisted on the necessity of an impress, and of having recourse to extraordinary means for the necessary supply of

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    New Windsor, NY - 7 February 1781

    I proceeded to the States of Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire, and delivered the despatches, with which I was charged, to the Governors and to the President, to whom they were addressed.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 8 February 1781

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I have just received intelligence ... that a fleet of the enemy's ships have entered Cape Fear river.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Guilford, NC - 9 February 1781

    Since I wrote your Excellency by Major Giles, Lord Cornwallis has been constantly in pursuit of the light infantry and the prisoners, and is now between the Shallow Ford, upon the Yadkin and Salem, one of the Moravian towns

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 12 February 1781

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I am informed, through a private channel, on which I have considerable reliance, that the enemy had landed five hundred troops under the command of a Major Craig...

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 14 February 1781

    we esteem it incumbent on us to afford your Excellency the perusal of a letter which we have addressed to Congress, a copy whereof we have the honor to inclose.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Irwins Ferry - 15 February 1781

    Lord Cornwallis has been at our heels from day to day ever since we left Guilford; and our movements from thence to this place have been of the most critical kind, having a river in our front, and the enemy in our rear.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 15 February 1781

    I have the pleasure to inform you that Colonel Laurens sailed on the 10th, after waiting several days in Nantasket Road for a fair wind.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 17 February 1781

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... we are informed that Lord Cornwallis had burned his own wagons in order to enable himself to move with greater facility...

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Newburg - 18 February 1781

    General Knox informed me, to-day, that no artillery was to go from hence. I had previously ordered fifty draught-horses to be impressed for transporting the artillery, ammunition, and tents.

  • Joseph Jones letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 February 1781

    I beg leave to mention to you a young gentleman, captured by the enemy when the Buckskin fell into their hands in the Chesapeake Bay, and who was put on shore under parole, and wishes to be discharged

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 25 February 1781

    The Indians have lately killed one man upon Ten Mile Creek, and the inhabitants are in great consternation. The frontier settlements will doubtless be deserted, as I have not troops to protect them.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 26 February 1781

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I gave you information in my last letter, that General Greene had crossed the Dan, at Boyd's Ferry...

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    High Rock Ford - 28 February 1781

    We have the most unequivocal and full evidence of the disaffection of a great part of this State. The enemy have raised seven independent companies in a single day; and we have the mortification to find, that most of the prisoners we take are inhabit

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 March 1781

    Your Excellency remembers that our shortest calculation for the arrival of the troops at the Head of Elk was for the 6th of March. I am happy to inform you that they will be there this day or to-morrow early

  • John Sullivan letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 March 1781

    After I wrote your Excellency, I found the eyes of Congress turned on Robert Morris, of this city, as Financier. I did not therefore nominate Colonel Hamilton, as I foresaw it would be but a vain attempt.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Head Of Elk River, MD - 7 March 1781

    Contrary winds, heavy rains, disappointments of vessels, and every inconvenience for which we had no remedy, have been, from the day of my arrival, combined against our embarkation.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 8 March 1781

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I had the pleasure of receiving a letter from General Greene...

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Iron Works, SC - 10 March 1781

    On the 2d, Lieutenant-Colonel Lee, with a detachment of riflemen, attacked the advance of the British army under Colonel Tarleton, near Alamanee, and killed and wounded, by report, about thirty of them.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    York, NY - 15 March 1781

    On my arrival yesterday afternoon, I found that Baron De Steuben had been very active in making preparations, and, agreeably to what he tells me, we shall have five thousand militia ready to operate.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Iron Works, SC - 18 March 1781

    My letter to Congress, a copy of which I inclose to your Excellency, will inform you of an unsuccessful action with Lord Cornwallis on the 15th. Our prospects were flattering ; and had the North Carolina militia seconded the endeavours of their offic

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Passy, FRA - 24 March 1781

    M. de Vergennes complains very much of the excessive demands of Congress, and seems to entertain an idea that they wish to throw too much of the burden of the war on their ally.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 25 March 1781

    My surprise at not hearing of the French fleet was, I confess, very great, nor could I reconcile my mind to this uncertainty. But intelligence, received yesterday, has put it out of doubt, that they have done their best endeavours towards the coopera

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 27 March 1781

    Indeed, this place is infested with such a set of disaffected inhabitants, that I have been under the necessity of ordering some away, and others must soon follow, to prevent greater injury to the service.

  • Chevalier De La Luzerne letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 March 1781

    I lament the ill success of an expedition. which, if it had succeeded, would have been doubly agreeable to us by its utility to our allies, and by the honor it would have reflected upon the arms of the King

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    New Windsor, NY - 27 March 1781

    There being no established principles to govern the appointments to the vacancies of officers in the artillery, some doubts have arisen since the last regulation of the army, whether the right of appointment is in Congress

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Deep River, SC - 29 March 1781

    an account from Richmond, of Admiral Arbuthnot's arriving in the Chesapeake, with six ships of the line and upwards of thirty transports, with a considerable reenforcement.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Madrid, ESP - 29 March 1781

    I take the liberty of sending you a cask of Packaretti, the favourite wine of our late friend, Don Juan, whose death I much lament.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 3 April 1781

    The motives which led Congress to postpone filling the War department have leaked out, and been communicated to me.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Hartfd, CT - 6 April 1781

    Having recent intelligence of the present situation & probable intentions of a body of the Refugees assembled at Lloyd's neck, I take the liberty to make a few observations to your Excellency on the subject.

  • John Stark letter to George Washington.

    Derryfield, NH - 9 April 1781

    But notwithstanding my physical ills, I have undertaken the business of sending the recruits of this State to the army, and have detained several officers that were on furlough in the State, to conduct parties.

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Passy, FRA - 11 April 1781

    It is his most Christian Majesty's determination to guarantee a loan of ten millions of livres, to be opened in Holland, in favor of the United States, in addition to the gratuitous gift of six millions granted before my arrival

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Susquehanna Ferry - 13 April 1781

    By a letter just received from General Greene, I find that he is strongly of opinion that I must go to the southward. His intention is to carry the seat of war into South Carolina

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Newburg - 14 April 1781

    I had the honor to inform you, on my return from Philadelphia, of what passed there relative to the means of procuring the numerous supplies requisite in my department for the ensuing campaign ; and was unhappy that no prospect was presented of my ob

  • Friedrich Steuben letter to George Washington.

    Chesterfield - 15 April 1781

    I am much at a loss what to do for arms, when the recruits do come in. I had reckoned on those by M. de Tilly; and I must entreat your Excellency to order them on by land, as we have not the least prospect of a single musket any other way.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Fairfield, CT - 20 April 1781

    I returned here to this place this morning & have, by different Persons, procured accurate Draughts of the Enemies Works...

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 23 April 1781

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... On the 18th instant, the enemy came from Portsmouth up James river, in considerable force, though their numbers are not yet precisely known to us.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Alexandria, VA - 23 April 1781

    When the enemy came to your house, many negroes deserted to them. This piece of news did not affect me much, as I little value those concerns.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Newport, RI - 25 April 1781

    In my late Interview with C~ the matter of a future Correspondence, to be rendered more regular & more advantageous was fully discussed.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    De Peysters Point, NY - 27 April 1781

    It is become necessary to me to apply to your excellency, to know in what manner you foresee you will be able to employ me in the ensuing campaign. I am ready to enter into activity whenever you think proper

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    , SC - 1 May 1781

    We fight, get beat and fight again. We have so much to do and so little to do it with, that I am much afraid these States must fall, never to rise again

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    De Peysters Point, NY - 2 May 1781

    I am extremely sorry to have embarrassed you by my late application, and that you should think there are insuperable obstacles to a compliance with it.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Wethersfield, CT - 2 May 1781

    Since my last letter to your Excellency from NewPort, the Count De Rochambeau has requested me to open a channel of intelligence from N.Y. via Long Island.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Bottoms Creek - 4 May 1781

    Every mark of friendship I receive from you adds to my happiness, as I love you with all the sincerity and warmth of my heart; and the sentiment I feel for you goes to the very extent of my affections.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 8 May 1781

    By letters from North Carolina I find that Lord Cornwallis, who, I had been assured, had sailed for Charleston, is advancing towards Halifax.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 9 May 1781

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... The enemy, after leaving Williamsburg, came directly up James river and landed at City Point...

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Mccords Ferry, SC - 14 May 1781

    They left it with great precipitation, after burning the greater part of their baggage, and stores belonging to the inhabitants. They also burnt the jail, mill, and several other houses, and left the town little better than a heap of rubbish.

  • William Heath letter to George Washington.

    Hartford, CT - 15 May 1781

    I arrived here yesterday afternoon, found the General Assembly sitting, and presented your letter to Governor Trumbull, together with a representation, containing the spirit of my instructions.

  • Joseph Jones letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 May 1781

    The late movements of Cornwallis and Phillips indicate a junction of their armies on the Roanoke, from whence they may direct their operations north or south, as they shall see best, without the fear

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Camp Wilton - 17 May 1781

    The next day the officer returned with the same passport and letter, and informed me that he was now at liberty to declare that Phillips was dead, and Arnold was Commander-in-chief of the British army in Virginia.

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 May 1781

    I have been honored with your letter of the 12th instant, declaring to me that no charge having been brought against me before your Excellency, the Court of Inquiry into my conduct could proceed upon no other principle, in the military way, than the

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 24 May 1781

    Public stores and private property being removed from Richmond, this place is a less important object. I do not believe it would be prudent to expose the troops for the sake of a few houses, most of which are empty.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Charlottesville, VA - 28 May 1781

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... I am now advised that they have evacuated Petersburg, joined at Westover a reinforcement of two thousand men just arrived from New York...

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Chantilly, VA - 12 June 1781

    Virginia, it is true, has nine times the number of men that now threaten its ruin; but they are dispersed, unarmed, without system, government, and very little probability at present of the Legislature assembling.

  • Robert Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 June 1781

    I am Financier electa, but that is all; for had I taken the oath and my commission, my seat in the Assembly must have been vacated. And I think it of the utmost consequence to preserve my right of appearing there

  • James Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 15 June 1781

    From a variety of accounts, received through different channels, I am informed the enemy's force at Crown Point is near two thousand, though I cannot persuade myself that they are near so strong.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Bush River, SC - 22 June 1781

    We are anxiously waiting the arrival of the second division of the French fleet. Virginia affords the most inviting object.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Mattapony River, MD - 24 June 1781

    My coming into this country has attracted this side a large portion of the enemy's force. In the meanwhile General Wayne was filing off towards Westover, and the remainder of the army to Ruffin's Ferry.

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 0 July 1781

    General Knox has called on me to-day, respecting a provision of horses for the light artillery. I have authorized Colonel Hughes to purchase one hundred for that service only

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Peekskill, NY - 2 July 1781

    If your Excellency should think fit to alter the time of the arrival of the stores from Philadelphia, I pray you to write to the Board of War on the subject.

  • Antony Wayne letter to George Washington.

    Chickahominy, VA - 8 July 1781

    After a variety of marches and countermarches, frequently offering battle to Lord Cornwallis upon military terms, the Marquis De Lafayette received intelligence on the 5th that the enemy had marched from Williamsburg for Jamestown

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 9 July 1781

    Your feelings of distress excite a sympathy in my breast, and a readiness to do all in my power to remove the occasion. That the Committee from the Connecticut line of the army did not accomplish a full settlement, was to me a matter of sorrow, and f

  • John Stark letter to George Washington.

    Derryfield, NH - 15 July 1781

    I shall set out for Saratoga The beginning of next week, and on my passage shall hold a treaty with the Green Mountain Boys.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Santee, SC - 17 July 1781

    It affords me great pleasure to hear that an attack is meditating against New York. This measure no doubt will create a powerful diversion in favor of this country

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 17 July 1781

    I wrote yesterday to the Treasurer, to inform me this week, what sum of hard money is and can be immediately collected for the army, which shall be sent forward without delay.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Malvan Hill - 20 July 1781

    When I went to the southward, you know I had some private objections. But I became sensible of the necessity there was for the detachment to go, and I knew that, had I returned, there was nobody that could lead them

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Malvan Hill - 30 July 1781

    There are, in Hampton Road, thirty transport ships full of troops, most of them red-coats ; there are eight or ten brigs, which have cavalry on board.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Santee, SC - 6 August 1781

    Governor Rutledge arrived in camp a few days since, and informed me that a French fleet of twenty sail of the line, besides frigates, were to be on the coast by the 25th of this month, to cooperate with the American army

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Pamunky, VA - 6 August 1781

    The embarkation, which I thought and do still think to have been destined to New York, was reported to have sailed up the Bay, and to be bound to Baltimore

  • James Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 9 August 1781

    On Tuesday night, about ten o'clock, a most daring attempt was made by a party of the enemy, headed by a Captain Myers, to surprise General Schuyler in his house, at this place.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    York River, VA - 21 August 1781

    The greater part of the enemy are at York, which they do not as yet fortify ; but are very busy upon Gloucester Neck, where they have a pretty large corps under Colonel Dundas.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Camden, SC - 26 August 1781

    the hanging of Colonel Hayne, one of our militia Colonels, whom the enemy hung in Charleston, a little time since, as a traitor, as they call him.

  • Robert Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 28 August 1781

    I directed the Commissary-General, immediately on my return from camp, to cause the deposit of three hundred barrels of flour, three hundred barrels of salt meat, and twelve hogsheads of rum, to be made at the Head of Elk

  • Daniel Brodhead letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 29 August 1781

    The Maryland corps was stationed at a post on the frontier of Westmoreland county, and have in a body deserted and crossed the mountains.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Trenton, NJ - 31 August 1781

    We have put, and are putting on board the vessels, the ordnance, ordnance stores, &c. I shall send, in the same vessels, the corps of artillery, corps of sappers and miners, and also General Hazen's regiment.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 8 September 1781

    Mine of yesterday mentioned that the ships in York River had gone down. Inclosed is an account I receive of an engagement off the Capes.

  • James Duane letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 September 1781

    we have thrown the solitary remnant of our Marine into the management of our Financier. It will save a capital expense, as the Admiralty, Navy Boards, and their subordinate offices, are dissolved.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Hartford, CT - 15 September 1781

    The loss of property by the conflagration was, however, very great, and ruinous to many individuals, as also a sensible damage to the public. Yet, what is more to be regretted, is the unhappy fate of that worthy officer. Colonel Ledjard

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Santee, SC - 17 September 1781

    Since I wrote to you before, we have had a most bloody battle. It was by far the most obstinate fight I ever saw. Victory was ours

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Epping Forest, VA - 17 September 1781

    I assure you. Sir, the Commissaries' and Quartermasters' departments in the State, so far as I have observed them, have in every thing been the reverse of right

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    York, NY - 30 September 1781

    I am far from laughing at the idea of the enemy's making a retreat. It is not very probable ; but it is not impossible. Indeed, they have no other way to escape

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 5 October 1781

    I immediately waited on the Intendant with Count Chastellux's letter, reciting the agreement he had made with me respecting the future employment of the vessels, and desiring him to pay me two thousand dollars

  • John Rutledge letter to George Washington.

    Santee, SC - 5 October 1781

    I wrote your Excellency about the 6th ultimo, by Colonel Morris, soliciting such aid as might be necessary for the recovery of Charleston, as soon as New York should fall.

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Berkley County - 7 October 1781

    The secrecy and expedition of your Excellency's movement from the North River, defeated my wish to have paid you my compliments in person upon your route, as I never knew of your being upon the march until you had passed Alexandria.

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Chantilly, VA - 12 October 1781

    By this time, I hope his Lordship begins seriously to repent the Quixote part that he has been acting in America. Surely the rage of despotism must be cooled by the total defeat of those great hopes, which have been entertained of southern conquest

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    York, NY - 16 October 1781

    Colonel Gimat's battalion led the van, and was followed by that of Colonel Hamilton, who commanded the whole advanced corps. At the same time, a party of eighty men, under Colonel Laurens, turned the redoubt.

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 23 October 1781

    At Gloucester the dragoon horses, with their accoutrements, and the wagonhorses and wagons, were delivered up that day, and the whole committed by Colonel Dearborn to militia guards.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Santee, SC - 25 October 1781

    I am happy to find the army under your command ready to commence operations against Lord Cornwallis ; but I am sorry to hear you think the issue somewhat doubtful.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    York, SC - 26 October 1781

    As Count de Grasse cannot aid us in our most favorite object, an expedition against Charleston, and if an attempt to reduce it is now made, it must be independent of a marine force

  • Charles Cornwallis letter to George Washington.

    York, VA - 27 October 1781

    Many of our officers having repeated their representation to me that they apprehend that they lose the benefit of tbe capitulation on that head by signing their paroles in the form proposed by your commissary

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 6 November 1781

    The very interesting and important news of the surrender of General Lord Cornwallis; with the British army, shipping, &c., &c., under his command, reached me on the 26th ultimo by a vessel from the Chesapeake

  • Thomas Chittenden letter to George Washington.

    Arlington, VT - 14 November 1781

    I herein transmit the measures by which this State has conducted her policy for the security of her frontiers

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    , SC - 21 November 1781

    The reduction of Charleston is an event much to be wished ; but to be able to cover the country and confine the enemy to that place, will be a great object.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 29 November 1781

    Inclosed you will find some numbers, a copy of which I have kept, and which contain some names that may probably occur in our correspondence.

  • William Irvine letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 2 December 1781

    At the time Congress directed me to repair to this place, I took for granted your Excellency would have information thereof through different channels

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 21 December 1781

    The moment I arrive in France, I will write to you minutely how things stand, and give you the best accounts in my power.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 15 January 1782

    It is now a notorious fact, that three parties have been expressly sent from Canada to take or put me to death.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    St. Pauls Parish, SC - 21 January 1782

    Through a good channel of intelligence I got information of troops expected, both from Cork and New York. I was so alarmed at it, that I sent off Captain Ragsdale to Virginia, and Lieutenant-Colonel Stewart to North Carolina, to try to hasten on supp

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 21 January 1782

    Induced by the situation of a number of the citizens of this State, who had been captured on the frontiers by ravaging parties of the enemy, and carried into Canada, I last spring addressed a line to Governor Haldiman, on the subject of their liberat

  • Robert Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 January 1782

    Recruiting the army is certainly of importance, and ought therefore to be urged upon the several States ; but, should it be necessary to expend money for that purpose, it must not be considered as a part of the quota called for by Congress

  • Jean Baptiste De Vimeur letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 5 February 1782

    As, by the intelligences I had from your Excellency, and those I got from the flag, it appears that the reenforcement from New York for Charleston does not exceed thirteen hundred men

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    St. Pauls Parish, SC - 7 February 1782

    my apprehensions were so great, and the consequences appeared to me so fatal to this country, I made application, without hesitation

  • William Irvine letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 February 1782

    The present strength of the garrison at Fort Pitt is two hundred and thirty. At least thirty of these are unfit for field duty, and several, even garrison duty

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 February 1782

    description

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Jacksonburg - 12 February 1782

    These being my sentiments, I apply with confidence to your Excellency, and beg leave to solicit, in the most earnest terms, your friendly attention to my father's circumstances.

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 February 1782

    Your Excellency advised that the ox-teams should be assembled by the middle of May last year. I would request your direction for the present year on this head. The longer their assembling is delayed, consistent with the expected operations, the bette

  • Jean Baptiste De Vimeur letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 27 February 1782

    The legion de Lauzun by this time must be arrived at Charlotte Court-House. It will be needful that it stay there some time, because the men are almost quite naked

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 March 1782

    The difficulties I experienced last campaign in obtaining a command, will not suffer me to make any farther application on that head.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 March 1782

    I wish them to be sensible that it is not a diminution of zeal which induces me voluntarily to withdraw my services, but that I only refrain from intruding them, when circumstances seem to have made them either not necessary or not desired

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Ponpon, SC - 9 March 1782

    Your Excellency will see by the King's speech, and other measures taking in Great Britain, the enemy are determined to prosecute the war

  • Thomas Chittenden letter to George Washington.

    Arlington, VT - 16 March 1782

    it affords us great satisfaction that your Excellency is willing to consider them as implying the right, which Vermont claims, to be a State, within certain described bounds.

  • Chevalier De La Luzerne letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 April 1782

    On my return here, I found letters from my Court, dated in February last. They do not announce any thing pacific on the part of our enemies.

  • William Irvine letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 20 April 1782

    I arrived here the 25th of March. At that time things were in greater confusion than can well be conceived. The country people were, to all appearance, in a fit of frenzy.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Greenfield, MA - 27 April 1782

    I have this morning returned from L.I. to which place I have been on an appointed Interview with Culper S.G. & others.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Worthington, MA - 9 May 1782

    I have just recd a letter from Mr. Silas Deane, which at the request of the author, I beg leave to present to Your Excellency for perusal...

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    , SC - 19 May 1782

    Count de Grasse is a prisoner, and has lost six ships of the line; and I fear the rest of the fleet are so shattered as to be incapable of attempting any thing for a long time.

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    Bacons Bridge, SC - 19 May 1782

    I am much obliged to you for honoring my bill in favor of General Lincoln. It includes the whole sum expended, on your account, in France.

  • William Irvine letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 21 May 1782

    A number of the principal people of this country made application to me, about two weeks since, for my consent to their collecting a body of volunteers to go against Sandusky

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 May 1782

    While the Financier held up to my view the prospect of supplies, I presented the same to Colonel Hughes and at my own office, and thereby kept alive the hopes of the public creditors

  • Chevalier De La Luzerne letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 June 1782

    I wait with extreme impatience the news of the arrival of the French division before New York; and no one can desire more warmly than I do to see it under your immediate command.

  • Jean Baptiste De Vimeur letter to George Washington.

    Williamsburg, VA - 8 June 1782

    The Captain of a flag, arrived yesterday from New York, assures that he had sailed with thirty-six transports, escorted by three ships of war, going to Charleston and Savannah. They are empty, and it is believed they are going to evacuate those place

  • John Laurens letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 12 June 1782

    the encouragement given me by Governor Howley, who has a decisive influence in the counsels of that country, induce me to remain in this quarter for the purpose of taking new measures on the subject of our black levies.

  • William Irvine letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 16 June 1782

    I mentioned to your Excellency that a body of volunteer militia were assembling at the Mingo Bottom, to go against Sandusky.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Ashley River, SC - 11 July 1782

    The troops have been so badly clothed, and the season is so very hot, that many of the soldiery have been seized with fevers, which renders them unfit for service

  • William Irvine letter to George Washington.

    Fort Pitt, PA - 11 July 1782

    were overtaken, about thirty miles from the field of action, by a body of Indians, to whom they surrendered. They were taken back to Sandusky, where they all, except the Doctor, were put to death.

  • Jean Baptiste De Vimeur letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 July 1782

    I had the honor to write to your Excellency that, at my departure from York in Virginia, I would leave in that place a detachment of four hundred French troops, which were to he joined by a corps of the Virginian militia

  • Horatio Gates letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 August 1782

    General Lincoln has, in his letter of yesterday, acquainted me that it is your Excellency's desire to know if I wish to take command in the army this campaign.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Newtown, CT - 18 August 1782

    I must again repeat to your Excellency the necessity of having some a Sum of Money as well as some stain forwarded for the use of this Communication.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Ashley Hill, SC - 29 August 1782

    Since I wrote to your Excellency, a day or two ago, Lieutenant-Colonel Laurens has been killed in an action on the Combahee River, about fifty miles south of our camp.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Veals Ford, CT - 1 September 1782

    I beg leave to recommend Sergt. Elijah Churchil of the ... Company of Lt. Infantry, 2d Regt. LDragoons to be inrolled in the Book of Merit

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Cantito - 2 September 1782

    In my last I informed Your Excellency that I had made proposals to a Certain Person, formerly an officer in one of the Refugee Corps., & who is exceedingly intimate at Head Qrs, that he should assist in communicating intelligence...

  • Jean Baptiste De Vimeur letter to George Washington.

    Princeton, NJ - 7 September 1782

    The news which I have here of the British fleet, are that Admiral Pigot is got into New York with very few ships, himself in a bad state of health, and that Admiral Hood, with the greatest part of the fleet, has sailed for Halifax.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Fairfield, CT - 10 September 1782

    I had an Interview with several characters who have been serviceable in the Way of Intelligence particularly S.C. & have enclosed the Substance of the Intelligence which they Communicated.

  • John Stark letter to George Washington.

    Derryfield, NH - 23 September 1782

    This State has exceeded all expectations in raising their recruits ; yet there is still a number deficient, which probably may not be got very soon.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Ashley Hill, SC - 4 October 1782

    the evacuation of Charleston is reduced to a certainty. The following disposition, it is said, is to be made of the troops in garrison.

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 20 October 1782

    I was sensible of the delicacy entertained by your Excellency respecting yonr interference with the internal police of the French army ; but, as the persons concerned in the dispute were Americans, I should have had great reluctance in making the app

  • Jean Baptiste De Vimeur letter to George Washington.

    Hartford, CT - 30 October 1782

    I received a letter from M. de Yaudreuil, saying that he is sorry to have appointed the 8th of next month for my arrival with my troops at Boston, because the men-of-war at Portsmouth are not yet ready

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Bedford, CT - 4 December 1782

    I had accounts yesterday from Long Island informing that Adml. Digby was at Huntington on a hunting party, & that Genl. Carleton was expected there in a Day or two

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Stamford, CT - 8 December 1782

    So long a detention at this place, added to the Circumstance of Col. Thompson's Spy-boat escaping, has rendered a further Prosecution of the plan, in my Opinion, improper.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Ashley Hill, SC - 10 December 1782

    I doubt not your Excellency expected to hear of the evacuation of Charleston long before this. The enemy are not yet gone, although now just upon the eve of their departure. In two days more, the town will be free.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Horseneck - 14 December 1782

    If Your Excellency should conclude to station me on Duty near the sound, I shall endeavor, as far as I am able, to obtain the most accurate accounts of the Movements & position of the Enemy

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Greenfield, MA - 4 January 1783

    I have endeavored to take such measures as I judged the most effectual to Guard the Coast, & prevent the frequent & growing Commercial Intercourse with Long Island.

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Newburg - 18 January 1783

    Your Excellency had but just left my quarters this evening, when a Deputy-Sheriff of Ulster arrested me. He showed me a writ, of which I beg leave to inclose a copy.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Greenfield, MA - 20 January 1783

    At the earnest solicitation of Mr. Banks ^of this Place I have been prevailed on to write Your Excellency respecting his Son, Thomas Banks, who deserted from the Reg.+ about six weeks ago

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Greenfield, MA - 31 January 1783

    I some time since wrote Gov.r Clinton respecting Wm Boothe, in whose favor Interest has been made to have him restored to his friends, & be reinstated in his property...

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Cadiz, ESP - 5 February 1783

    Were you but such a man as Julius Caesar, or the King of Prussia, I should almost be sorry for you at the end of the great tragedy where you are acting such a part. But, with my dear General, I rejoice at the blessings of a peace where our noble ends

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 February 1783

    The state of our finances was perhaps never more critical. I am under injunctions, which will not permit me to disclose some facts that would at once demonstrate this position; but I think it probable you will be possessed of them through another cha

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Greenfield, MA - 21 February 1783

    I am happy in having occasion to Congratulate Your Excellency on the success which has attended a part of my Detachment Yesterday in Capturing one of the Enemies armed Vessels on the Sound.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Greenfield, MA - 24 February 1783

    Yesterday I obtained information that one of the commiss.d boats from this State had gone over from to Norwalk to Long Island after Goods

  • Robert Livingston letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 February 1783

    I have the honor to inform your Excellency that our last despatches, dated in October, announced a disposition in the belligerent powers to terminate the war by a general peace.

  • Joseph Jones letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 February 1783

    Congress have been, for some time past, almost wholly employed in devising some general and adequate funds for paying the interest, and in time sinking the principal, of the public debt

  • Robert Livingston letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 March 1783

    The Washington packet arrived this morning. I have not yet had leisure to read all my letters but as an express is ready to go early to-morrow, I rather choose to rely upon your goodness to excuse a letter written in extreme haste

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 16 March 1783

    The evacuation of Charleston, and the proposals of peace, are matters highly interesting to this country, whose finances and political arrangements are in the most deplorable situation. Charleston remains without a platform, or a single cannon for it

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 March 1783

    Our affairs wear a most serious aspect, as well foreign as domestic. Before this gets to hand, your Excellency will probably have seen the Provisional Articles between Great Britain and these States.

  • Robert Livingston letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 March 1783

    You will by this express receive the agreeable intelligence of a general peace, upon which I most sincerely congratulate you and the army.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Greenfield, MA - 24 March 1783

    I have taken the liberty to confine Nathan Barnum said to be an Ensign in Colonel Ludlon's Regime, now a Prisoner of War. He was taken in April last and a most notorious Robbery...

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 March 1783

    The army, by their resolutions, express an expectation that Congress will not disband them previous to a settlement of accounts, and the establishment of funds. Congress may resolve upon the first, but the General opinion is that they cannot constitu

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 March 1783

    Here I write as a citizen zealous for the true happiness of this country; as a soldier, who feels what is due to an army which has suffered every thing, and done much for the safety of America.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Greenfield, MA - 29 March 1783

    if accounts are true, I presume the face of Public Affairs has suffered a considerable Change.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Greenfield, MA - 31 March 1783

    ...I have to request that Your Excellency would be pleased to suffer me with my Detachment to be among the first, who may go in to the City

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 11 April 1783

    The idea of not attempting to separate the army before the settlement of accounts, corresponds with my proposition. That of endeavouring to let them have some pay, has also appeared to me indispensable.

  • Robert Livingston letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 April 1783

    I congratulate your Excellency, most sincerely, upon the cessation of hostilities, which you will learn from the inclosed proclamation.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 April 1783

    description

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 17 April 1783

    It appears to me indispensably necessary that some troops should be kept in service in time of peace, for the purpose of garrisoning the posts, which it may be thought expedient to maintain on the frontiers, and to protect the public magazines.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 20 April 1783

    I beg leave to congratulate your Excellency upon the returning smiles of peace, and the happy establishment of our independence. This important event must be doubly welcome to you, who have so successfully conducted the war

  • letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 April 1783

    I have been honored with your Excellency's favor of the 22d instant, bearing testimony to the merits and talents of Mr. McHenry. The character which I had preconceived of this gentleman was precisely that which your representation has confirmed.

  • Joseph Jones letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 May 1783

    We have at length got through the plan of funds to be recommended to the States for their adoption. It has been the most difficult and perplexing discussion of any that have engaged the attention of this body for some time.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Passy, FRA - 13 June 1783

    I have, within these few days past, road and admired your address to the army, and their proceedings in consequence of it.

  • Jean Baptiste De Vimeur letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 13 July 1783

    I see you at the glorious end of all your toils, and with the desire to come to France. Try, my dear General, to effectuate this project. Let nothing oppose itself to the idea.

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 8 August 1783

    I see, by the papers, the Northern army does not choose to be furloughed. The people here begin to be alarmed at it.

  • Benjamin Tallmadge letter to George Washington.

    Litchfield, CT - 16 August 1783

    When I last had the honor of seeing Your Excellency I mentioned the Circumstance of there being some monies due S. Culper & others for secret services...

  • Friedrich Steuben letter to George Washington.

    Saratoga, NY - 23 August 1783

    Although General Haldimand's answers to my demands were sufficiently clear not to be misunderstood, I requested his definitive answer in writing, a copy of which, together with a copy of my letter, is inclosed.

  • Thomas Paine letter to George Washington.

    Bordentown, NJ - 21 September 1783

    By the advice of Mr. Morris, I presented a letter to Congress expressing a request that they would be pleased to direct me to lay before them an account of what my services, such as they were, and situation, had been during the course of the war.

  • Thomas Paine letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 October 1783

    We have no news here. The definitive treaty and treaty of commerce are long in completing. I suppose the British begin to find out the weak part of America. The imprudent conduct and publications of Rhode Island have, among other things, served to sh

  • George Clinton letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 14 October 1783

    We have as yet no certainty when the British will leave the southern district of this State, though all accounts agree that their stay will not exceed the 10th of next month.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 15 October 1783

    May you long live, my dear General, and long have the joy to see the increasing splendor and prosperity of a rising nation, aided by your counsels, and defended by your sword!

  • Nathanael Greene letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 November 1783

    I return your Excellency many thanks for your polite letter, accompanying the resolution of Congress, complimenting me with a couple of cannon.

  • Benjamin Harrison letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 6 January 1784

    It gives me great pleasure to inform that the Assembly yesterday, without a dissenting voice, complimented you with fifty shares in the Potomac Company, and one hundred in the James River Company

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 21 February 1784

    Your calm retreat of Mount Vernon must be a source of ineffable delight to you. You can from thence take a retrospective view of the critical exigencies of the war, and see a thousand ways by which the issue might have been the reverse of what it is.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 9 March 1784

    Had I not so perfect a confidence in your friendship, I should very much fear to tire you with my scribbling of this day ; but cannot leave my pen before I have again mentioned my tender, respectful affection to my dear General.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Annapolis, MD - 16 April 1784

    Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington... The way to make friends quarrel is to put them in disputation under the public eye.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Sr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 20 April 1784

    A month more, I trust, will bring me to the haven of retirement ; in the tranquillity of which I hope to have leisure to attend to and cultivate those seeds of private friendship, which have been planted during the tumults of war

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Annapolis, MD - 28 May 1784

    I have now been here nearly one week, and nothing of importance has been decided upon, owing to the contrariety of sentiments concerning the powers vested in Congress to raise troops, in time of peace, for any purpose.

  • Benjamin Hawkins letter to George Washington.

    , NC - 10 June 1784

    I have the honor to inclose to your Excellency some acts passed at the last session of our Legislature, by which you will see, in some measure, the disposition of this State to comply with the views of Congress

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 2 July 1784

    The arrangement which is to carry you to Europe has been made known to me by Mr. Short, who tells me he means to accompany or follow you.

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    Chantilly, VA - 22 July 1784

    The very great respect that I shall ever pay to your recommendations, would have been very sufficient to have procured my exertions in favor of Mr. Paine, independent of his great public merits in our revolution.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 August 1784

    I have already had the pleasure to acquaint you with my arrival in America, and am endeavouring to reach Mount Vernon as soon as possible.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 8 October 1784

    Everywhere I have met with delays; but so agreeable were they in their nature, that I cannot complain of them. It is not quite the same with the Indian treaty, although the hope to he useful has kept me there longer than I had expected.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 22 October 1784

    On my arrival at Boston, I have been so friendly received, that no words can express my truly affectionate gratitude.

  • James Duane letter to George Washington.

    Trenton, NJ - 16 December 1784

    it is to be deplored that federal attachment, and a sense of national obligation, continue to give place to vain prejudices in favor of the independence and sovereignty of the individual States.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 21 December 1784

    No, my beloved General, our late parting was not by any means a last interview. My whole soul revolts at the idea ; and could I harbour it an instant, indeed, my dear General, it would make me miserable.

  • letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 1 January 1785

    A Resolution has passed both Houses instructing the Commissioners, appointed in June last to settle with Maryland Commissioners the jurisdiction of the Potowniac

  • Benjamin Harrison letter to George Washington.

    Berkley, VA - 8 February 1785

    As to your fears of appearing ostentatious, by a refusal, I think they are altogether groundless. Your countrymen have too high an opinion of your discernment not to acquiesce in your determination

  • Chevalier De La Luzerne letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 15 February 1785

    the King is concerned that your domestic affairs deprive him of the satisfaction to see a man, whose talents and virtues have procured the happiness of his country, and excited the admiration of all others.

  • Patrick Henry letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 19 March 1785

    I will freely own to you, that I am embarrassed to reconcile the law, taken in its full extent, with the declarations you mention, and a fixed purpose of refusing pecuniary rewards.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 24 March 1785

    My jealousy for your fame is so high that I should prefer seeing you, Cincinnatus-like, following your plough, rather than accept the least pecuniary reward whatever.

  • William Grayson letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 0 May 1785

    The ordinance for disposing of the western territory has been under consideration ever since I wrote you last, and has undergone several alterations ; the most considerable of which is, that one half of the land is to be sold by sections or lots

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 3 May 1785

    We are amused here with an account, that does not indeed come officially to us, hut however in such a way as to merit attention.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 4 July 1785

    My dear General, This letter will be delivered by the celebrated M. Houdon, who is going, for your statue, to America.

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 10 July 1785

    Mr. Houdon would much sooner have had the honor of attending you, but for a spell of sickness, which long induced us to despair of his recovery, and from which he is but recently recovered.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Sarreguemines, FRA - 14 July 1785

    I have been lately visiting some French towns, where I spoke a great deal about American trade, and fully answered the views I had the honor to communicate in a former letter.

  • Noah Webster letter to George Washington.

    Baltimore, MD - 18 July 1785

    The favorable reception of my grammatical publication in the Northern States, has induced me to offer them for sale in the Southern

  • William Grayson letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 25 July 1785

    Congress are informed, by a letter from Mr. Adams, that he has been introduced to the King of Great Britain in due form, and received as a public Minister from the United States of America.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Vienna, AUT - 3 September 1785

    This letter has been requested of me as an introduction for M. Andre Michaux, whom, for many reasons, I am happy to present.

  • James Madison letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 11 November 1785

    Your letter for the Assembly was laid before them yesterday. I have reason to believe that it was received with every sentiment which could correspond with yours.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 23 November 1785

    The Society of this State met some short time since, and took into consideration the proposed alterations in the original frame of the Institution. Some were strenuous for adhering to the old Constitution, a few for adopting the new, and many for a m

  • Edmund Randolph letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 4 January 1786

    Although I was compelled, by duty, to lay before the Council your answer to my notification of your appointment to Philadelphia, I was happy to find them concurring with me in the propriety of entreating you not to decide on a refusal immediately.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 4 January 1786

    I have since my return, my dear General, been looking, agreeably to your request, among my young friends, to see whether I could find among them one who would answer your purpose as a private Secretary

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 4 January 1786

    have been honored with your letter of September the 26th, which was delivered me by Mr. Houdon, who is safely returned. He has brought with him the mould of the face only, having left the other parts of his work with his workmen to come by some other

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 10 February 1786

    The inclosed, my dear General, is a vocabulary which the Empress of Russia has requested me to have filled up with Indian names, as she has ordered a universal dictionary to be made of all languages.

  • Henry Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 16 February 1786

    It is very doubtful, how our Commissioners may succeed with the Indians. We have too much reason to fear a war, which, among other evils, will increase our finance embarrassments.

  • Edmund Randolph letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 2 March 1786

    You may possibly be surprised, that a work, which has already expended a considerable sum of money, should be delineated in so few words as the copies now sent contain.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 2 March 1786

    In December, a young man, under the influence of more important advisers, made an attack in the papers, which rendered the publication of my correspondence with him expedient.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 16 March 1786

    An opinion begins to prevail, that a General Convention for revising the articles of Confederation would be expedient.

  • William Grayson letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 27 May 1786

    Of late, there has been a tolerably full representation; but the time of Congress has been chiefly taken up with an investigation of the Connecticut cession of western territory.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 June 1786

    Our affairs seem to lead to some crisis; some revolution ; something that I cannot foresee, or conjecture. I am uneasy and apprehensive ; more so than during the war.

  • Henry Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 7 August 1786

    My mind has no doubt of the extensive good consequences that would result to the Union from a commercial connection with Spain

  • Catherine Macaulay letter to George Washington.

    Knightsbridge, ENG - 10 October 1786

    There are few persons in Europe who would not be highly flattered by a correspondence with General Washington

  • Henry Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 11 October 1786

    The Eastern States consider a commercial connection with Spain as the only remedy for the distresses which oppress their citizens ; most of which, they say, flow from the decay of their commerce.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 26 October 1786

    I have been travelling through some garrison towns, in order to preserve the habit of seeing troops and their tactics. Now I am mostly at Fontainbleau, where the Court is residing for a few weeks.

  • James Madison letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 1 November 1786

    The Report from the Deputies to ANNAPOLIS lies on the table, and I hope will be called for before the business of the Mississippi begins to ferment.

  • David Humphreys letter to George Washington.

    New Haven, CT - 1 November 1786

    The troubles in Massachusetts still continue. Government is prostrated in the dust. And it is much to be feared that there is not energy enough in that State to reestablish the civil powers.

  • James Madison letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 8 November 1786

    The intelligence from General Knox is gloomy indeed, but it is less so than the colours in which I had it through another channel.

  • Edmund Randolph letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 6 December 1786

    What our enemies have foretold, seems to be hastening to its accomplishment ; and cannot be frustrated but by an instantaneous, zealous, and steady union among the friends of the Federal Government.

  • James Madison letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 7 December 1786

    In admitting Tobacco for a commutable, we perhaps swerved a little from the line in which we set out. I acquiesced in the measure myself as a prudential compliance with the clamours within doors and without

  • James Madison letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 24 December 1786

    Your observ.ions on Tobacco as a commutable in the taxes are certainly just and unanswerable. My acquiescence in the measure was against every general principle which I have embraced

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 7 January 1787

    Shall we have a King ? Not, in my opinion, while other expedients remain untried. Might we not have a Governor-General, limited in his prerogatives and duration ?

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 14 January 1787

    With respect to the Convention proposed to meet in May, there are different sentiments. Some suppose it an irregular assembly, unauthorized by the Confederation, which points out the mode by which any alterations shall be made.

  • James Madison letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 21 February 1787

    The objects now depending and most immediately in prospect are: 1. The Treaty of Peace. The Secretary of foreign Affairs has very ably reported a view of the infractions on both sides, his exposition of the contested articles, and the steps proper to

  • James Madison letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 18 March 1787

    Recollecting to have heard you mention a plan formed by the Empress of Russia for a comparative view of the Aborigines of the new Continent, and of the N. E. parts of the old, through the medium of their respective tongues

  • James Madison letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 16 April 1787

    Conceiving that an individual independence of the States is utterly irreconcileable with their aggregate sovereignty, and that a consolidation of the whole into one simple republic would be as inexpedient as it is unattainable, I have sought for midd

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 5 May 1787

    he persuaded the King to assemble notable persons of each order, to please them with a plan of Assemblies in each Province, which was much desired, and to get their approbation for new taxes, with which he durst not, by himself, saddle the nation.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 3 July 1787

    The prevailing apprehension among thinking men is, that the Convention, from the fear of shocking the popular opinion, will not go far enough. They seem to be convinced, that a strong, well-mounted Government, will better suit the popular palate, tha

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 15 July 1787

    I have the honor to inclose to you an ordinance, that we have just passed in Congress, for establishing a temporary Government beyond the Ohio, as a measure preparatory to the sale of the lands.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 14 August 1787

    I have hitherto forborne the pleasure, my dear Sir, of writing to you since my return from Philadelphia. I have been apprehensive, that the stages of the business of the Convention might leak out, and be made an ill use of by some people.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 3 October 1787

    The new Constitution is received with great joy by all the commercial part of the community.

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 11 October 1787

    We have the pleasure to see the first act of Congress for selling federal lands, north-west of the Ohio, becoming productive very fast, a large sum of public securities being already paid in upon the first sales

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 14 October 1787

    No decisive indications of the public mind in the Northern and middle States can yet be collected. The reports continue to be rather favorable to the act of the Convention from every quarter

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 15 October 1787

    My dear General, I have a few days ago written to you by M. de Moustier, the new Minister from this Court. He is a sensible and honest man, with whom I think that the people of America will be satisfied.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 30 October 1787

    I am much obliged to your Excellency for the explicit manner in which you contradict the insinuations mentioned in my last letter. The only use I shall make of your answer, will he to put it into the hands of a few friends.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 October 1787

    The States eastward of New York appear to be almost unanimous in favor of the new Constitution, (for I make no account of the dissension in Rhode Island.)

  • George Mason letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 6 November 1787

    A resolution this day passed for an absolute prohibition of all imported spirits, with some others, in my opinion, almost equally impolitic, and calculated to subject the eastern part of the State to the arbitrary impositions of the western.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 18 November 1787

    All my informations from RICHMOND concur in representing the enthusiasm in favor of the new Constitution as subsiding, and giving place to a spirit of criticism.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 20 November 1787

    The latest authentic information from Europe places the Dutch in a wretched situation.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 7 December 1787

    I understand that the Constitution will certainly be adopted in Connecticut, the returns of the Deputies being now known, and a very great majority found to be its declared and firm friends.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 14 December 1787

    I find by from RICHMOND that the proceedings of the Assembly are, as usual, rapidly degenerating with the progress of the Session; and particularly that the force opposed to the act of the Convention has gained the ascendance.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 26 December 1787

    I am just informed by a Delegate from New Hampshire that he has a letter from President Sullivan, which tells him that the Legislature had unanimously agreed to call a Convention

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 1 January 1788

    It is needless for me to tell you, that I read the new proposed Constitution with an unspeakable eagerness and attention. I have admired it, and find in it a bold, large, and solid frame for the Confederation.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Jr. letter to George Washington.

    Hartford, CT - 9 January 1788

    With great satisfaction I have the honor to inform you that, last evening, the Convention of this State, by a great majority, voted to ratify and adopt the new proposed Constitution for the United States

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 14 January 1788

    The daily Advertiser this date contains several important articles of information, which need only to be referred to. I enclose it, with a few other late papers.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 20 January 1788

    The Count de Moustier arrived here a few days ago, as successor to the Chevalier De La Luzerne.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 25 January 1788

    It is generally understood here that the arguments contained in it in favor of the Constitution are much stronger than the objections which prevented his assent.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 27 January 1788

    I have the pleasure of inclosing two newspapers, in which are the debates of the Convention to Saturday, the 19th. They are not forward enough to give your Excellency a just state of the business.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 28 January 1788

    The information which I have by the Eastern mail rather increases than removes the anxiety produced by the last. I give it to you as I have received it, in the words of Mr. King:

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 1 February 1788

    The eastern mail which arrived yesterday brought me a letter from Mr. King, of which a copy follows:

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 3 February 1788

    the Governor has taken his seat as President of the Convention; and that he came forward with a motion for the adoption of the Constitution

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 6 February 1788

    The Convention this evening ratified the Constitution ; present, three hundred and fifty-five members ; one hundred and eighty-seven yeas, and one hundred and sixty-eight nays

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 8 February 1788

    The form of the ratification of Georgia is contained in one of the papers herewith enclosed. Every information from South Carolina continues to be favorable.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 11 February 1788

    The newspaper enclosed, with the letter which follows, comprises the information brought me by the mail of yesterday:

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 15 February 1788

    I have at length the pleasure to enclose you the favorable result of the Convention at Boston.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 20 February 1788

    I have given notice to my friends in Orange that the County may command my services in the Convention if it pleases.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 3 March 1788

    The Convention of New Hampshire has afforded a very disagreeable subject of communication. It has not rejected the Constitution, but it has failed to adopt it.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Orange, VA - 10 April 1788

    Having seen a part only of the names returned for the Convention, and being unacquainted with the political characters of many of them, I am a very incompetent prophet of the fate of the Constitution.

  • Charles Pinckney letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 24 May 1788

    South Carolina has ratified the Federal Constitution. Our Convention assembled the 12th instant, and yesterday the vote of ratification was taken

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 25 May 1788

    Permit me once more, my beloved General, to insist on your acceptance of the Presidency.

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 3 June 1788

    Hence federalism and anti-federalism were pitted one against the other. The antifederalists were in hopes of throwing such an influence into the Government by a change of its officers, as to prevent an organization of the General Government by this S

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 4 June 1788

    I found, contrary to my expectation, that not only a very full house had been made on the first day, but that it had proceeded to the appointment of the President and other officers.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 13 June 1788

    Appearances at present are less favorable than at the date of my last. Our progress is slow, and every advantage is taken of the delay to work on the local prejudices of particular sets of members.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 23 June 1788

    We got through the Constitution by paragraphs to-day. To-morrow, some proposition for closing the business will be made.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 25 June 1788

    On the question to-day for previous amendments, the votes stood 80 ayes, 88 noes.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 27 June 1788

    The Convention came to a final adjournment today. The inclosed is a copy of their act of ratification, with the yeas and nays.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 4 July 1788

    I congratulate you, my dear Sir, on the adoption of the Constitution by Virginia. That event has disappointed the expectation of opposition here, which nevertheless continues pertinacious.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 17 July 1788

    The Convention this moment adjourned, and I am writing in their chamber. A question being about to be put on the mode of adoption (which you have seen), we moved that the House adjourn for a month or two.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 21 July 1788

    Congress have deliberated in part on the arrangements for putting the new machine into operation, but have concluded on nothing but the times for choosing electors

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 28 July 1788

    It is with the most sincere satisfaction that I congratulate you on the unconditional adoption of the Constitution by the Convention of this State.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 15 August 1788

    The place of meeting has undergone much discussion, as you conjectured, and still remains to be fixed. Philadelphia was first named, and negatived by a voice from Delaware.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 24 August 1788

    The circular letter from this State is certainly a matter of as much regret as the unanimity with which it passed is matter of surprize.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 14 September 1788

    The delay in providing for the commencement of the Government was terminated yesterday, by an acquiescence of the minor number in the persevering demands of the major.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 21 September 1788

    I am not sure that the new government will be found to rest on principles sufficiently stable to produce a uniform adherence to what justice, dignity, and liberal policy may require

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 21 October 1788

    The Count Moustier and the Marchioness Brehan are to set out this day for Mount Vernon. I take it for granted you are not only apprised of the intended visit, but of the time at which the guests may be expected.

  • Jonathan Trumbull Jr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 28 October 1788

    I wish the States were like to be as happily unanimous in their Vice-President.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 5 November 1788

    The enclosed memorandum was put into my hands by Mr. St. John, the French Consul. He is a very worthy man

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Morrisania, NY - 12 November 1788

    After many unforeseen delays, I am about shortly to take my departure from Philadelphia for the kingdom of France, and I expect to visit both Holland and England.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 December 1788

    I came to this city with a view either to return to New York or proceed to Virginia, as circumstances might require. I was not sure that the spirit of party might not take pleasure in superseding the opportunity of remaining longer in New York.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 21 December 1788

    In the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Connecticut, the great object of organizing the new Constitution, engrosses the attention of the people. It is with sincere satisfaction that I can assert, from personal observation, that the affecti

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Orange, VA - 14 January 1789

    I fear, from the vague accounts which circulate, that the federal Candidates are likely to stand in the way of each other.

  • Thomas Marshall letter to George Washington.

    Fayette County, KY - 12 February 1789

    It appears plain to me that the offers of Lord DorChester, as well as those of Spain, are founded on a supposition that it is a fact that we are about to separate from the Union ; else, why are those offers not made to Congress?

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 3 March 1789

    Since that period, there are advices here, which announce the re-establishment of the King of Great Britain's health ; but from a letter I have just now received from the Marquis de la Luzerne, I am disposed to doubt the fact.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Baltimore, MD - 5 March 1789

    On our Journey hither, we have fallen in with the bearer of the Electoral votes of Georgia. They are unanimous as to the President, and are all thrown away on Individuals of the State as to the Vice president.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 March 1789

    I find that the communication made you from Kentucky corresponds with an official letter to Congress from Governor St. Clair, which speaks of the same emissary, and the same errand.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 19 March 1789

    When a quorum will be made up in either House rests on vague conjecture rather than on any precise information. It is not improbable, I think, that the present week will supply the deficiency in one, if not in both of them.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 26 March 1789

    It is the most authentic and precise evidence of the Spanish project that has come to my knowledge.

  • Richard Lee letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 6 April 1789

    On this day we went to business ; and, to my very great satisfaction, I heard a unanimous vote of the electing States in favor of calling you to the honorable office of President of the United States.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 6 April 1789

    The arrival of R. H. Lee yesterday has made up a quorum of the Senate. A quorum in the other house was made on Wednesday last.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 29 April 1789

    Monsieur de Lafayette is since returned from his political campaign in Auvers-ne, crowned with success. He had to contend with prejudices, and the interests of his order

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 2 May 1789

    Until the adoption of the present system of National Government, it was a constant and a painful reflection to every patriot, that the inefficacy of the late Confederation threatened to deprive America of those blessings, for which she was greatly in

  • Benjamin Lincoln letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 23 May 1789

    This letter will be honored by its being borne by the Honorable George Cabot. Feeling, as all others do, an esteem for and obligations to your Excellency, he intends to wait upon you and express them.

  • Thomas Marshall letter to George Washington.

    Woodford County, KY - 26 June 1789

    Permit me. Sir, to express my extreme happiness on account of your Excellency's acceptance of the Presidency of the United States

  • Henry Lee letter to George Washington.

    Stratford - 1 July 1789

    Although the exalted station, which your love of us and our love of you has placed you in, calls for change in mode of address, yet I cannot so quickly relinquish the old manner.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Dieppe, FRA - 31 July 1789

    I will also communicate a matter, which Mr. Jefferson was not yet informed of, and which I could not tell him, because I was forbidden to mention it to any person here.

  • David Humphreys letter to George Washington.

    Rock Landing, CT - 21 September 1789

    But, upon receiving information from Messrs. Pickens and Osborne, that the Indians were growing very impatient to return to their homes, and that they could not possibly be detained but a few days longer, we recommenced our journey that evening.

  • David Humphreys letter to George Washington.

    Rock Landing, CT - 26 September 1789

    On Monday last (that is to say, the day after the arrival of General Lincoln and myself), a Deputation from all the Creeks of the Tuccasee, the Hallowing, and the Tallassee Kings, waited upon us, to congratulate us on our arrival

  • David Humphreys letter to George Washington.

    Rock Landing, CT - 27 September 1789

    McGillivray omitted to comply with his positive promise, to write to us, or come over the river, in order to explain the objections of the Chiefs to the project of the treaty which we had proposed to them

  • Catherine Macaulay letter to George Washington.

    Bracknal, ENG - 0 October 1789

    the Americans, in their judicious choice, have, I flatter myself, secured to themselves the full and permanent enjoyment of that liberty, for which they are indebted to your persevering valor, in the first instance.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 21 October 1789

    As Governor of the Commonwealth, I feel it to be my duty to receive your visit with such tokens of respect as may answer the expectations of my constituents, and may in some measure express the high sentiments of respect they feel towards you.

  • John Hancock letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 23 October 1789

    I observe you had proposed taking an early dinner at Watertown, and proceeding to Cambridge, and from thence to Boston, on Saturday afternoon.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Orange, VA - 20 November 1789

    A day or two after I got to Philadelphia I fell in with Mr. Morris. He broke the subject of the residence of Congress, and made observ.ions which betrayed his dislike of the upshot of the business at N. York

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Orange, VA - 5 December 1789

    Since my last I have been furnished with the inclosed copy of the letter from the Senators of this State to its Legislature. It is well calculated to keep alive the disaffection to the Government

  • Edmund Randolph letter to George Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 6 December 1789

    When I had the honor of writing to you last, the amendments had, I believe, been under consideration in a Committee of the Whole, and ten were adopted, and the two last rejected.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Georgetown, MD - 4 January 1790

    After being detained 8 or ten days beyond the intended commencement of my journey by the critical illness of my mother, I am now subjected to a further delay by an attack on my own health

  • Chevalier De La Luzerne letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 17 January 1790

    After having given freedom to your country, it was worthy of the virtues and great character of your Excellency, to establish her happiness on a solid and permanent basis, which is assuredly the result of the new Federal Constitution

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 January 1790

    Yesterday I went to dine with the Count de Montmorin, and expressed to him my wish that France might seize the present moment to establish a liberal system of commercial policy for her Colonies.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 January 1790

    In another letter of this date, I have mentioned a part of yesterday's conversation with the Count de Montmorin. That part of it, which I am now to communicate, is for yourself alone.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 January 1790

    I shall, in consequence, set off for London as soon as I possibly can.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 January 1790

    Yesterday I went to dine with the Count de Montmorin, and expressed to him my wish that France might seize the present moment to establish a liberal system of commercial policy for her colonies.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 24 January 1790

    It gave me very sincere pleasure to learn from you the good tidings, which you communicate respecting our new form of government. I know that you are not liable to the dupery of false hopes and groundless expectations

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 February 1790

    The serious crisis of affairs in which the United States are involved with the Creeks, requires that every honorable and probable expedient that can be devised should be used to avert a war with that tribe.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 17 March 1790

    Our revolution is getting on as well as it can, with a nation that has swallowed liberty at once, and is still liable to mistake licentiousness for freedom.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 7 April 1790

    I assured him of our sincere disposition to be upon good terms, and then proceeded to mention those points in the treaty of peace which remained to be performed.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 13 April 1790

    My letter of the seventh will have communicated what passed with the Duke of Leeds respecting the business you committed to me.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 13 April 1790

    I am still waiting for intelligence from the Ministers, who (to judge by appearances) slumber profoundly upon the application made to them.

  • Thomas Paine letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 1 May 1790

    Our very good friend, the Marquis De Lafayette, has intrusted to my care the key of the Bastille, and a drawing handsomely framed, representing the demolition of that detestable prison, as a present to your Excellency

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 1 May 1790

    It seems pretty clear, that they wish to evade a commercial treaty, but not peremptorily to reject it; and, therefore, I have construed into rejection his Grace's abstruse language, leaving him the option to give it a different interpretation.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 2 May 1790

    On Satur day, the seventeenth, I dined in company with Mr Fox. The state of French politics formed, of course, a large part of the conversation. The situation of other countries was then passed in review, and it became a question how far Britain migh

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 29 May 1790

    The general opinion here is, that Spain will submit, and that Spain only is the object of this armament. But I hold a very different faith.

  • Thomas Paine letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 31 May 1790

    The political hemisphere is again clouded by a dispute between England and Spain ; the circumstances of which you will hear before this letter can arrive.

  • Charles Pinckney letter to George Washington.

    Charleston, SC - 19 June 1790

    I am infinitely obliged to you, for having favored me with introductory letters for my nephew, Mr. Horry. It will give him an opportunity of travelling with such great advantage

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 3 July 1790

    I have heard nothing since from the Duke of Leeds. On the tenth of June the King prorogued the parliament, which was dissolved on the eleventh. The election will be completed in about ten days

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 16 August 1790

    You will have seen the declaration, and counter declaration, of the Spanish and British courts, exchanged at Madrid the twenty-fourth of last month. These leave the material ground of controversy in its original state, and the armaments go on with un

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 28 August 1790

    For God's sake, my dear General, take care of your health ! Do not devote yourself so much to the Cabinet, while your habit of life has, from your young years, accustomed you to constant exercise.

  • John Adams letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 29 August 1790

    That New Orleans and the Spanish posts on the Mississippi will be among the fiirst attempts of the English, in case of a war with Spain, appears very probable ; and that a combined operation from Detroit would be convenient to that end, cannot be dou

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 30 August 1790

    The situation of France, however, seems at first sight to preclude all effort. The national bank, which was in contemplation, has never taken effect.

  • Thomas Marshall letter to George Washington.

    Woodford County, KY - 11 September 1790

    I have taken the liberty to inclose to you a Kentucky paper, wherein is published an extract from one of Mr. Brown's letters respecting the Spanish business.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 18 September 1790

    Sweden being unsupported by her allies, and Russia having nothing to gain by farther fighting, but a part of the Finland deserts, not worth fighting for, they have struck a bargain of peace immediately

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 24 September 1790

    I have already had occasion to mention the impress of American seamen, to serve on board of British ships of war. The ministers seemed desirous of doing what was right, and of avoiding just ground of complaint

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 17 October 1790

    A British packet arrived yesterday. The accounts she brings are all of a warlike aspect.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 November 1790

    My last letter was of the twenty-fourth of September. Since that period, I have passed through Flanders and a part of Germany, and having coasted the Rhine to Strasburg, came thence to this city.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 November 1790

    The country I now inhabit, on which so many other countries depend, having sunk to absolute nothingness, has deranged the general state of things in every quarter

  • David Humphreys letter to George Washington.

    Lisbon, PRT - 30 November 1790

    You will be pleased to observe, by my letter to him of this date, that the Court of Lisbon, having, from a desire of opening an official intercourse with the United States, made the first advances, by appointing a Minister Resident

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 1 December 1790

    To begin then with our friend Lafayette, who has hitherto acted a splendid part. The King obeys but detests him. He obeys because he fears.

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 December 1790

    I have this moment received and read your very obliging letter of this date, expressing your entire approbation of my conduct in the conference, which, by your orders, I have lately held with the Seneca Indians.

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 January 1791

    General Knox informed me, that it would be agreeable to you that I should undertake the Superintendency of the northern Indians ; I mean particularly the Six Nations.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 7 March 1791

    Whatever expectations I had conceived of a speedy termination to our revolutionary troubles, I still am tossed about in the ocean of factions and commotions of every kind.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 9 March 1791

    In the debate on this subject one of the Lameths gave it as his opinion, that America was not in a situation to be either sought or feared for some time to come.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 April 1791

    It is to be lamented that our system is such as still to leave the public peace of the Union at the mercy of each State Government.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 April 1791

    By the information from Fort Harmar, of the 17th, and Pittsburg, of the 31st, it would appear that the Delawares and Wyandots are committing depredations, and that they will be joined in the war against us.

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 3 May 1791

    The rage of parties, even among the patriots, is gone as far as it is possible, short of bloodshed ; but, although hatreds are far from subsiding, matters do not appear so ill disposed as they formerly were towards a collision among the supporters of

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 27 May 1791

    In a letter to Colonel Hamilton, of the 31st of January, 1790, I mentioned what had passed between M. Necker and me respecting the debt due by the United States to France

  • Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 6 June 1791

    The Assembly has put an end to her existence by a new convocation ; has unfitted her own members for immediate reelection and places in the Executive; and is now reducing the Constitution to a few principal articles

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 June 1791

    Colonel Procter has just arrived in this city by the way of Fort Pitt. He was unable to go forward to the western Indians without an escort of the Six Nations.

  • Thomas Paine letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 21 July 1791

    I took the liberty of addressing my late work, "Rights of Man" to you ; but though I left it, at that time, to find its way to you, I now request your acceptance of fifty copies, as a token of remembrance to yourself and my friends.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 September 1791

    I have received a letter from the Minister of France, of which the inclosed is a copy.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 September 1791

    The Minister of France has written me a letter, of which the inclosed is a copy.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 23 September 1791

    How far the present fiscal arrangements require amendments or additions, can best be ascertained of the secretary.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 30 September 1791

    The view which it gives of our prosperity as a nation swelled my bosom with emotions, which none can know but those who have experienced them.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 October 1791

    Poor Lafayette ! Your letter for him must remain with me some time. His enemies here are as virulent as ever

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 27 December 1791

    I observe, that when a man purchases in France goods which are to be sold in England, he pays for those goods by the proceeds of bills drawn on England, and as he makes the acquisition of the goods with a view to the future sales

  • Edmund Randolph letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 January 1792

    By the papers, which I have now the honor of returning to you, a wish seems to be expressed that the President should recommend to Congress a digest of federal law, the appointment of one person only to such a service, and the selection of the author

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 4 February 1792

    At the close of the session of the first National Assembly, a coalition was brought about between the Jacobins and the Quatre-vingt-neufs. It is proper to explain these terms.

  • Benjamin Hawkins letter to George Washington.

    , NC - 10 February 1792

    Prompted by the free and candid manner you expressed yourself in political affairs to me some days past, I shall, without reserve, communicate to you the reasons which induced me yesterday to vote for striking out the second section in the bill

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 17 March 1792

    I was informed that you had nominated me as minister to the court of France, but the latest advices from America, which come down to the tenth of January, show that the Senate had not then made their decision.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 21 March 1792

    I find that the King of France has appointed to the office of Foreign Affairs a Monsieur Dumouriez, and that it is considered as a sacrifice to the Jacobins. He is a bold, determined man.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 10 June 1792

    My former letters have mentioned to you the indiscipline of the French armies, and the public prints will give you such facts on that head, as may tend to making up in your mind a solid judgment as to future events.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Orange, VA - 21 June 1792

    The questions which it presents for consideration are 1st . At what time a notification of your purpose to retire will be most convenient?

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 28 July 1792

    A meeting of the Cherokees, at Estanaula, had taken place, which lasted from the 24th of June to the 1st of July, at which the Little Turkey and many other Chiefs were present

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 August 1792

    General Putnam, in his letter of the 5th of July, which principally contains the same information as that mentioned in Wilkinson's letters, states it as his opinion, that a treaty ought to be concluded, as soon as possible, with the Wabash Indians

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 August 1792

    I am happy to be able, at length, to send you answers to the objections which were communicated in your letter of the 29th of July.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 August 1792

    The manner of treating the Spaniards and McGillivray, was unanimously considered as the most proper to be adopted in the present conjuncture.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 23 October 1792

    Poor Lafayette ! Your letter for him must remain with me yet some time. His enemies here are as virulent as ever, and I can give you no better proof than this.

  • Alexander Hamilton letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 November 1792

    I have carefully reflected on the application of Mr. Ternant, for an additional supply of money for the use of the Colony of St. Domingo, on account of the debt due to France, which I regard more and more as presenting a subject extremely delicate an

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 28 December 1792

    As to that war, I am told that the British ultimatum is as follows. France shall deliver the royal family to such reigning branch of the Bourbons as the King may choose, and shall re call her troops from the countries they now occupy.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 10 January 1793

    Those who planned the revolution, which took place on the tenth of August, sought a person to head the attack, and found a M. Westermann, whose morals were far from exemplary.

  • Edmund Randolph letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 February 1793

    Convulsed as we are, I cannot but believe that there is scarcely a man in the Government, whom party will not, sooner or later, destine for an attack.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 14 February 1793

    You will find that events have blackened more and more in this country. The present prospects are dreadful.

  • Edmund Randolph letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 February 1793

    I do myself the honor of presenting to you some of those views, which the very delicate affair of the removal affords, and the result of a provisional inquiry which I set on foot.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 25 June 1793

    As to your re-acceptance, Sir, you know my sentiments, which, on that, as on some other subjects, are, I think, unchangeable. It will be time enough for you to have a successor, when it shall please God to call you from this world's theatre.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 18 October 1793

    The present government is evidently a despotism both in principle and practice. The Convention now consists of only a part of those, who were chosen to frame a constitution.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 19 October 1793

    It may be an important judicial question, how far the Minister is protected by the law of nations, after the arrival of his successor.

  • James Madison Jr letter to George Washington.

    Orange, VA - 24 October 1793

    I now lose not a moment in complying with its request; tho' I foresee it cannot reach you before you will have left Mount Vernon

  • Jonathan Trumbull Jr. letter to George Washington.

    Lebanon, CT - 31 October 1793

    Moreover, the Constitution must be paramount to the law in such cases ; otherwise, the power granted may be so controlled as not to be sufficient to surmount the necessity of the occasion.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 12 November 1793

    I understand that a kind of etiquette has been established, by which the Consuls, as not being properly diplomatic characters, are not received or invited with the Minister

  • Edmund Randolph letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 January 1794

    I do myself the honor of inclosing to you a certificate from Judge Wilson, of my having qualified as Secretary of State.

  • Edmund Randolph letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 January 1794

    I have examined all Mr. Morris's ministerial correspondence ; and, after the impression which I had received from others, whom I supposed to be conversant with it, I am really astonished to find so little of what is exceptionable

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 5 February 1794

    In a newspaper of this day I find the translation of your message of the fifth of December to Congress, and observe, that after stating the violation of the treaty by a decree of the National Convention, you tell them I have been instructed to make r

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Sainport, FRA - 13 March 1794

    The gazettes tell us that Mr Jefferson is coming to Europe ; some of them say as my successor ; others say it is a secret mission.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    unknown - 19 March 1794

    As it is understood that the bill for fortifying the ports and harbours has passed into a law, I beg leave respectfully to lay before you the following thoughts upon the manner of executing this business.

  • Edmund Randolph letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 April 1794

    I conclude, from what you observed yesterday, that, in the nomination of an Envoy Extraordinary to London, you prefer some statement more special than is customary in nominations.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Sainport, FRA - 10 April 1794

    On the eighteenth of October, I gave you a short view of the nature of the then government, and added what seemed to be the probable termination.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 30 April 1794

    Life is uncertain - whether I take your letter with me, or leave it here, it would, in case of my death, be inspected by others, who, however virtuous, might be indiscreet.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 23 June 1794

    The observations I have hitherto made induce me to believe that the war with France is popular, and that a war with us would be unpopular.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 21 July 1794

    Among my letters to Mr. Randolph, is one stating an agreement between Lord Grenville and myself for preserving things in a pacific and unaltered state, between us and the British on the side of Canada and the frontiers

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 5 August 1794

    I am this moment returned from a long conference with Lord Grenville. Our prospects become more and more promising as we advance in the business.

  • Henry Lee letter to George Washington.

    Norfolk - 3 September 1794

    My grief for the necessity of pointing the bayonet against the breasts of our countrymen, is equalled only by my conviction of the wisdom of your decision to compel immediate submission to the authority of the laws

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 13 September 1794

    The Secretary's letter by Mr. Monroe, and the speech of the latter to the Convention, are printed; and have caused a disagreeable sensation in the public mind here, and probably in that of the Government.

  • Edmund Randolph letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 October 1794

    There is nothing so little talked of as the yellow fever. I believe that I am almost the only inquirer after it

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 19 November 1794

    I am exceedingly anxious to return ; for although I have every other reason to be satisfied with my situation, yet I am not at home. I ought not to conceal from you, that the confidence reposed in your personal character was visible and useful throug

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Hamburg, DEU - 30 December 1794

    although I am persuaded that you will believe me, on my word, I will nevertheless assign some reasons why a change of situation was desirable.

  • Thomas Pinckney letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 30 January 1795

    In a letter, which I have lately received from the Secretary of State, I am desired to make such arrangements as may be necessary, previous to a mission which you have prepared for me as Envoy Extraordinary to the Court of Spain.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 25 February 1795

    The objects and efforts of the Jacobin societies in America were well known here ; and the fate of our government was considered as being involved in that of the insurrection.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 6 March 1795

    it is my opinion that the common and popular (not official) language of America, relative to Great Britain, manifested such a disposition as to create serious apprehensions in this country that we should join with the French in the war

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 29 June 1795

    The enclosed contains my resignation of the office of chief-justice. I cannot quit it without again expressing to you my acknowledgments for the honour you conferred upon me by that appointment

  • Robert Livingston letter to George Washington.

    Clermont - 8 July 1795

    In my present retired situation, I have carefully read and considered the treaty with England. I see in it not the slightest satisfaction for our wrongs. I see them, in some instances, authorized.

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 14 December 1795

    all my accounts agree in representing the public mind as becoming more and more composed, and that certain virulent publications have caused great and general indignation

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 26 January 1796

    For the debts, it seems to me best to take some sensible merchant, north of the Potomac, and particularly of Philadelphia, if one of acknowledged weight and character could be found willing to serve.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 28 January 1796

    Mr. Adams, the Governor, may console himself with his good intentions, but he has no credit for them in the opinion of the wise and enlightened part of his countrymen.

  • Timothy Pickering letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 July 1796

    Mr. Donaldson had gone to Leghorn with orders from Mr. Barlow to transmit two hundred thousand dollars to Algiers, which would procure the redemption of our captive citizens

  • John Jay letter to George Washington.

    New York, NY - 3 September 1796

    The article in the treaty, to which you allude, viz. the last, was proposed by me to Lord Grenville, because it seemed probable that when the treaty should for some time have been in operation, defects might become manifest

  • Rufus King letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 12 November 1796

    The declaration of war by Spain, at a moment when England appeared to be making serious efforts to conclude a general peace, strengthens the belief of many that France prefers still to continue the war.

  • Henry Knox letter to George Washington.

    Boston, MA - 15 January 1797

    The loss of two lovely children, on which you condoled in that letter, has been recently revived and increased by the death of our son, of seven years of age, bearing your name.

  • Rufus King letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 6 February 1797

    Some uneasiness has been manifest here for some few weeks past, concerning the situation of the British territories in the East Indies.