George Washington Letters for the years 1754 thru 1796

George Washington

George Washington wrote 243 Letters from a total of 37 locations including Alexandria, VA, Wills Creek, OH, and Great Meadows, PA. George Washington wrote a total of 83 people including Robert Dinwiddie, and John Jay. Most of George Washington's letters were written in the year 1781. Several other letters were written in 1758 and 1756. Who did George Washington know? View George Washington's social graph.

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  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    unknown -

    I have also sent some of the soldiers' accounts, in hope of getting the money for them, as they are uneasy on that head.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Alexandria, VA - 9 March 1754

    In my last, by Mr. Stewart, I slightly mentioned the objection, which many had against enlisting, to wit, not knowing who was to be paymaster, or the times for payment.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Alexandria, VA - 20 March 1754

    I was favored with your letter by Mr. Stewart, enclosing a lieutenant-colonel's commission, and I hope my future behaviour will sufficiently testify the true sense I have of this kindness.

  • George Washington letter to Richard Corbin.

    unknown - 20 March 1754

    In a conversation with you at Green Spring, you gave me some room to hope for a commission above that of major, and to be ranked among the chief officers of this expedition.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Wills Creek, OH - 25 April 1754

    Mr. Ward, has this day arrived from the Fork of the Monongahela, and brings the disagreeable account, that the fort, on the 17th instant, was surrendered at the summons of Monsieur Centre cceur to a body of French

  • George Washington letter to James Hamilton.

    Wills Creek, OH - 27 April 1754

    You will see, by the enclosed speech of the Half-King, that the Indians expect some assistance from you ; and I am persuaded you will take proper notice of their moving speech, and their unshaken fidelity.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Great Meadows, PA - 0 May 1754

    Since writing my last I have still stronger presumption, indeed almost confirmation, that they were sent as spies, and were ordered to wait near us, till they were truly informed of our intentions

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Little Meadows, PA - 9 May 1754

    The want of proper conveyances has much retarded this expedition, and at this time it unfortunately delays the detachment I have the honor to command.

  • George Washington letter to unknown.

    Youghiogany, OH - 18 May 1754

    These Indians contradict the report of the French having received reinforcements, though they agree that eight hundred men are very shortly expected.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Youghiogany, OH - 18 May 1754

    Giving up my commission is quite contrary to my intention. Nay, I ask it as a greater favor, than any amongst the many I have received from your Honor, to confirm it to me. But let me serve voluntarily

  • George Washington letter to Joshua Fry.

    unknown - 23 May 1754

    This day I returned from my discoveries down the Youghiogany, which, I am sorry to say, can never be made navigable.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Great Meadows, PA - 27 May 1754

    I received the news of your arrival at Winchester, and desire of seeing the Half-King and other chiefs of the Six Nations.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Great Meadows, PA - 29 May 1754

    The bearer hereof, Monsieur Drouillon, and Monsieur La Force and two cadets, I beg leave to recommend to your particular notice, as prisoners of war, and officers whom I had the honor of taking.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Great Meadows, PA - 29 May 1754

    I assure you, Sir, nothing is more a stranger to my breast, or a sin that my soul more abhors, than that black and detestable one of ingratitude.

  • George Washington letter to Joshua Fry.

    Great Meadows, PA - 29 May 1754

    This is by an immediate express, whom I send to inform you, that yesterday I engaged a party of French, whereof ten were killed, one wounded, and twenty-one taken, with the loss of only one of mine killed and two or three wounded

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Great Meadows, PA - 10 June 1754

    I shall with great pleasure wear the medal, which you were pleased to compliment me with, and shall present the others to Indian chiefs, as I have already done one to the Half-King.

  • George Washington letter to William Fairfax.

    Alexandria, VA - 11 August 1754

    He advanced slowly as far as Gist's house, thirteen miles from the Great Meadows, employing the soldiers on the way in repairing the road, and sending out scouting parties to watch the motions of the French.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Alexandria, VA - 20 August 1754

    Another thing, which should be fixed indisputably, is the law we are to be guided by, whether martial or military. If the former, I must beg the favor of your Honor to give me some written orders and indemnification

  • George Washington letter to William Fitzhugh.

    unknown - 15 November 1754

    I think the disparity between the present offer of a company and my former rank too great, to expect any real satisfaction or enjoyment in a corps, where I once had, or thought I had, a right to command

  • George Washington letter to Robert Orme.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 2 April 1755

    I find myself much embarrassed with my affairs, having no person in whom I can confide, to entrust the management of them with.

  • George Washington letter to John Robinson.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 20 April 1755

    It is true I have been importuned to make this campaign by General Braddock, as a member of his family, he conceiving, I suppose, that the small knowledge I have had an opportunity of acquiring of the country, Indians, &c., is worthy of his notice

  • George Washington letter to William Fairfax.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 23 April 1755

    I shall this day set out for Will's Creek, where I expect to meet the General, and to stay, I fear, too long, as the march must be regulated by the slow movements of the train ; which, I am sorry to say, will be tedious

  • George Washington letter to William Fairfax.

    Winchester, VA - 5 May 1755

    You will naturally conclude, that to pass through Maryland, when no object required it, was an uncommon, and an extraordinary route for the General and for Colonel Dunbar's regiment to this place.

  • George Washington letter to John Washington.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 14 May 1755

    As wearing boots is quite the mode, and mine are in a declining state, I must beg the favor of you to procure me a pair that are good and neat

  • George Washington letter to John Washington.

    Youghiogany, OH - 28 June 1755

    At the Little Meadows a second council was called (for there had been one before), wherein the urgency for horses was again represented to the officers of the different corps, and how laudable a farther retrenchment of their baggage would be

  • George Washington letter to Robert Orme.

    Great Crossing - 30 June 1755

    As the Doctor thinks it imprudent for me to use much exercise for two or three days, my movements will be retarded.

  • George Washington letter to Innes.

    Little Meadows, PA - 15 July 1755

    The horses, which carry the wounded gentlemen in litters, are so much fatigued, that we dread their performance ; therefore, it is desired that you will be kind enough to send out eight or ten fresh horses

  • George Washington letter to Mary Washington.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 18 July 1755

    As I doubt not but you have heard of our defeat, and, perhaps, had it represented in a worse light, if possible, than it deserves, I have taken this earliest opportunity to give you some account of the engagement as it happened

  • George Washington letter to John Washington.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 18 July 1755

    We have been most scandalously beaten by a trifling body of men, but fatigue and want of time prevent me from giving you any of the details, until I have the happiness of seeing you at Mount Vernon

  • George Washington letter to Augustine Washington.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 2 August 1755

    so little am I dispirited at what has happened, I am always ready, and always willing, to render my country any services that I am capable of, but never upon the terms I have done

  • George Washington letter to Robert Jackson.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 2 August 1755

    I must own, I was not a little surprised to find, that Governor Innes was the means of alarming the country with a report so extraordinary, without having better confirmation of the truth, than the story of an affrighted wagoner!

  • George Washington letter to Warner Lewis.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 14 August 1755

    The chief cause, next to indisposition, that prevented me from going down to this Assembly, was a determination not to offer my services ; and that determination proceeded from the following reasons.

  • George Washington letter to Mary Washington.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 14 August 1755

    If it is in my power to avoid going to the Ohio again, I shall ; but if the command is pressed upon me, by the general voice of the country, and offered upon such terms as cannot be objected against, it would reflect dishonor upon me to refuse it

  • George Washington letter to Andrew Lewis.

    Fredericksburg, VA - 6 September 1755

    The country has come to a resolution to raise sixteen companies, which are to be formed into a regiment, and of which they have honored me with the command.

  • George Washington letter to John Robinson.

    Alexandria, VA - 11 September 1755

    After a small halt at Fredericksburg, to issue orders to the recruiting officers appointed to that rendezvous, I proceeded to this place, in order to collect a return of the provisions and clothing

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Fredericksburg, VA - 8 October 1755

    I shall set out this evening for Winchester, where I expect to be joined by the recruits from Alexandria and this place, as soon as they can possibly march that distance

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 11 October 1755

    I was told by Colonel Martin, who had attempted to raise the militia for the same purpose, that it was impossible to get above twenty or twenty-five men, they having absolutely refused to stir

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 17 October 1755

    In however trifling a light the attempts of the French to alienate the affections of our southern Indians may at first appear, I must look upon it as a thing of the utmost consequence, requiring our greatest and most immediate attention.

  • George Washington letter to Adam Stephen.

    Alexandria, VA - 28 November 1755

    There has been such total negligence among the recruiting officers in general, such disregard of the service they were employed in, and such idle proceedings, that I am determined to send out none until we all meet

  • George Washington letter to Adam Stephen.

    Winchester, VA - 28 December 1755

    see that the troops are duly drawn out and trained to their exercise, and practised to bush-fighting.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Morris.

    Winchester, VA - 5 January 1756

    There is nothing more necessary than good intelligence to frustrate a designing enemy, and nothing that requires greater pains to obtain.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Alexandria, VA - 14 January 1756

    I have given all necessary orders for- training the men to a proper use of their arms, and the method of Indian fighting, and hope in a little time to make them expert.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Alexandria, VA - 14 January 1756

    When I was down, the Committee among other things resolved, that the Maryland and Carolina companies should not be supported with our provisions.

  • George Washington letter to Adam Stephen.

    Alexandria, VA - 1 February 1756

    You may tell Mr. Livingston from me, that, if the soldiers are not skilled in arms equal to what may reasonably be expected, he most assuredly shall answer for it at my return.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Alexandria, VA - 2 February 1756

    I can but return my very hearty thanks for your kind condescension in suffering me to wait upon General Shirley, as I am very well assured it was done with the intention to favor my suit.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 7 April 1756

    The enemy have returned in greater numbers, committed several murders not far from Winchester, and even are so daring as to attack our forts in open day

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 18 April 1756

    I wrote your Honor in my last how unsuccessfully we attempted to raise the militia, and that I was reduced to the necessity of waiting here for the arrival of an escort from Fort Cumberland.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 19 April 1756

    I immediately consulted Governor Innes, and such officers of my regiment as were at this place, on the necessary steps to be taken. They unanimously advised, that I should remain here with the fifty recruits that are in town

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 22 April 1756

    This encloses several letters, and the minutes of a council of war, which was held upon the receipt of them. Your Honor may see to what unhappy straits the distressed inhabitants and myself are reduced.

  • George Washington letter to John Robinson.

    Winchester, VA - 24 April 1756

    You may expect, by the time this comes to hand, that, without a considerable reinforcement, Frederic county will not be mistress of fifteen families. They are now retreating to the securest parts in droves of fifties.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 24 April 1756

    Three families were murdered the night before last, at the distance of less than twelve miles from this place ; and every day we have accounts of such cruelties and barbarities, as are shocking to human nature.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 27 April 1756

    The inhabitants, who are now in forts, are greatly distressed for the want of ammunition and provision, and are incessantly importuning me for both; neither of which have I at this place to spare.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 3 May 1756

    I have sent down an Indian scalp, which was taken at the place where Captain Mercer had his engagement. He was found thrust under some rocks, with stones piled up against them.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 25 June 1756

    Your Honor never gave me a decisive answer to a question I asked, about assigning companies to the fieldofficers. For this reason I have presumed to repeat it again

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 4 August 1756

    Giving the necessary orders and directions, about the chain of forts to be built on the frontiers, has kept me so closely employed, that I could not write fully to you until this time.

  • George Washington letter to John Robinson.

    Winchester, VA - 5 August 1756

    Fort Cumberland at present contains all our provisions and valuable stores, and is not capable of an hour's defence, if the enemy were only to bring a single halfpounder against it; which they might do with great ease on horseback.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 14 August 1756

    Repeated complaints and applications from all quarters for men, but more especially from the garrisons, which secure the communication with Fort Cumberland, obliged me to order a company from Captain Waggeners detachment

  • George Washington letter to Fairfax.

    Winchester, VA - 29 August 1756

    It is with infinite concern, that I see the distresses o the people, and hear their complaints, without being able to afford them relief. I have so often troubled you for aid from the militia, that I am almost ashamed to repeat my demands

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 23 September 1756

    Under your kind indulgence I came to this place a few days ago, expecting to meet the executors of my deceased brother, in order to make a final settlement of his affairs.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Halifax, VA - 10 October 1756

    Finding that it was impossible to get a party to range and scour the frontiers, it remained only to proceed without men to see the situation of the forts, or to return back.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Winchester, VA - 9 November 1756

    With this small company of irregulars, with whom order, regularity, circumspection, and vigilance were matters of derision and contempt, we set out, and, by the protection of Providence, reached Augusta Court-House in seven days

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 2 December 1756

    if you were truly informed of the situation of this place, of its importance and danger, you would not think it prudent to leave such a quantity of valuable stores exposed to the insults of a few

  • George Washington letter to William Bronaugh.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 17 December 1756

    You are strictly required, immediately upon receipt of this, to transmit your provisions and stores to Captain Waggener's Fort, and there leave them.

  • George Washington letter to John Robinson.

    Winchester, VA - 19 December 1756

    We are ordered to reinforce Fort Cumberland with one hundred men, and, to enable me to carry that number thither, all the stockade forts on the Branch are to be evacuated, and in course all the settlements abandoned

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 19 December 1756

    I am a little at a loss to understand the meaning of your orders, and the opinion of the Council, when I am directed to evacuate all the stockade forts, and at the same time to march only one hundred men to Fort Cumberland

  • George Washington letter to John Campbell.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 0 February 1757

    The posture of affairs in this quarter is really melancholy, and the prospect was rendered more gloomy while there appeared no hopes of amendment; but, from the presence of your Lordship at this time in the Dominion, we conceive hopes of seeing these

  • George Washington letter to Richard Washington.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 15 April 1757

    I have been posted, then, for twenty months past upon our cold and barren frontiers, to perform, I think I may say, impossibilities ; that is, to protect from the cruel incursions of a crafty, savage enemy a line of inhabitants, of more than three hu

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 16 April 1757

    Your letter by express, of the 5th instant, I fear has fallen into the hands of the common enemy, for I never have seen it.

  • George Washington letter to John Robinson.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 30 May 1757

    We receive fresh proofs every day of the bad direction of our Indian affairs. It is not easy to tell what expenses have arisen on account of these Indians, how dissatisfied they are, and how gloomy the prospect of pleasing them appears

  • George Washington letter to John Robinson.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 10 June 1757

    A person of a readier pen, and having more time, than myself, might amuse you with the vicissitudes, which have happened in the Indian affairs since Mr. Atkin came up.

  • George Washington letter to John Stanwix.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 15 June 1757

    A scouting party, consisting of five soldiers and fifteen Cherokee Indians, who were sent out the 20th ultimo towards the Ohio, under Lieutenant Baker, returned the 8th instant to Fort Cumberland with five scalps, and a French officer

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 16 June 1757

    If the enemy are coming down in such numbers, and with such a train of artillery, as we are bid to expect, Fort Cumberland must inevitably fall into their hands, as no timely efforts can be made to relieve the garrison.

  • George Washington letter to John Stanwix.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 20 June 1757

    It is altogether evident, if the Indian accounts may be relied on, that the French are bringing howitzers with them for the easier reduction of the place, if they should attack us.

  • George Washington letter to John Stanwix.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 28 June 1757

    but since you are so kind as to leave it discretionary with me, I freely confess, that I cannot entertain any thoughts of parting with the fewsoldiers I have, to strengthen a place that now seems to be in no actual danger.

  • George Washington letter to John Stanwix.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 30 July 1757

    My former letters would inform you how little share I had in confining the Indians to the public jail at this place.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 27 August 1757

    The drafts from Lunenburg are arrived, to the num ber of sixteen, which does not replace the soldiers, that have deserted since my last.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 17 September 1757

    It is evident, from a variety of circumstances, and especially from the change in your Honor's conduct towards me, that some person, as well inclined to detract, but better skilled in the art of detraction, than the author of the above stupid scandal

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 17 September 1757

    I apprehend, that thirteen of the twenty -nine drafts from Lunenburg have deserted, as sixteen only have arrived here, and I have no accounts of any more being on their march.

  • George Washington letter to William Peachey.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 18 September 1757

    it will be needless, I dare say, to observe further at this time, than that the liberty, which he has been pleased to allow himself in sporting with my character, is little else than a comic entertainment

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 24 September 1757

    The inhabitants of this valuable and very fertile valley are terrified beyond expression. Some have abandoned their plantations, and many are packing up their most valuable effects to follow them.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 5 October 1757

    As I cannot now send a proper monthly return of the regiment, for want of the remarks of the officers at the out-posts

  • George Washington letter to John Stanwix.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 8 October 1757

    I am favored with an opportunity ... to inform you of a very extraordinary affair, which has happened at this place, namely, the desertion of our quartermaster.

  • George Washington letter to John Robinson.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 25 October 1757

    I applied to the Governor for permission to go down and settle my accounts before he leaves the country, and to represent the melancholy situation of our distressed frontiers, which no written narrative can so well describe, as a verbal account

  • George Washington letter to Robert Dinwiddie.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 5 November 1757

    I again trouble your Honor on the subject of Indian affairs here, which have been impeded and embarrassed by such a train of mismanagement, as, if continued, must produce melancholy consequences.

  • George Washington letter to John Blair.

    Fredericksburg, VA - 30 January 1758

    Hearing of the Governor's departure for England, I think it a duty incumbent on me to inform your Honor, that I lingered a long time under an illness, which obliged me to retire from my command, by the surgeon's advice

  • George Washington letter to John Blair.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 20 February 1758

    I set out for Williamsburg the day after the date of my letter, but found I was unable to proceed, my fever and pain increasing upon me to a high degree

  • George Washington letter to John Stanwix.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 4 March 1758

    Pray, does not his plan sufficiently indicate the man? Can there be a better index to his abilities, than his scheme for reducing the enemy on the Ohio, and his expeditious march of a thousand men to Detroit?

  • George Washington letter to John Stanwix.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 10 April 1758

    Permit me, at the same time that I congratulate you, which I most sincerely do, on your promotion, so justly merited, to express my concern at the prospect of parting with you.

  • George Washington letter to Francis Halket.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 12 April 1758

    Are we to have you once more among us? And shall we revisit together a hapless spot, that proved so fatal to many of our former brave companions?

  • George Washington letter to John Blair.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 17 April 1758

    I think it incumbent on me to be informed by your Honor, how the regiment under my command is to be furnished with tents, ammunition, cartridge-paper, and many other requisites, that may be wanted in the course of the campaign.

  • George Washington letter to John Forbes.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 23 April 1758

    I have no higher ambition, than to act my part well during the campaign ; and if I should thereby merit your approbation, it will be a most pleasing reward for the toils I shall undergo.

  • George Washington letter to John Blair.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 24 April 1758

    I could by no means think of executing, willingly, that discretionary power, with which you were pleased to invest me, of ordering out the militia, It is an affair, Sir, of too important and delicate a nature for me to manage.

  • George Washington letter to John St. Clair.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 27 April 1758

    I have received Mr. President's orders to obey any command you shall be pleased to honor me with ; also to tell you, that the two companies from Carolina were at Fredericksburg, and may be expected here daily.

  • George Washington letter to Francis Halket.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 11 May 1758

    I must, therefore, beg that you will, from me, assure the General, that the Catawbas have not this year brought in one prisoner or scalp to this place, nor indeed to any other that I have heard of.

  • George Washington letter to John Blair.

    Williamsburg, VA - 28 May 1758

    I came here at this critical juncture, by the express order of Sir John St. Clair, to represent in the fullest manner the posture of our affairs at Winchester, and to obviate any doubts, that might arise from the best written narrative.

  • George Washington letter to Francis Fauquier.

    Fort Loudoun, PA - 17 June 1758

    Although but little skilled in compliments, permit me nevertheless to offer your Honor my congratulations on your appointment, and your safe arrival at a government

  • George Washington letter to Henry Bouquet.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 3 July 1758

    According to orders I marched from Winchester on the 24th ultimo, and arrived at this place yesterday, with five companies of the first Virginia regiment, and a company of artificers from the second

  • George Washington letter to Henry Bouquet.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 9 July 1758

    Colonel Byrd, with eight companies of his regiment, arrived here yesterday. He left many sick men behind, and, as he posted a company at Edwards's and Pearsall's, our strength is considerably reduced.

  • George Washington letter to Henry Bouquet.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 16 July 1758

    I was favored with your letter of the 14th instant, at eleven o'clock last night. The express, who brought it, informs me, that he was twice fired upon by Indians, and was obliged to abandon his horse to save himself.

  • George Washington letter to Henry Bouquet.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 19 July 1758

    I am exceedingly obliged by the handsome and polite manner, in which you are pleased to give me leave to attend the election at Winchester.

  • George Washington letter to Henry Bouquet.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 21 July 1758

    I had, before Colonel Stephen came to this place, abandoned all thoughts of attending personally the election at Winchester, choosing rather to leave the management of that affair to my friends

  • George Washington letter to Henry Bouquet.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 25 July 1758

    would it not facilitate the operation of the campaign, if the Virginia troops were ordered to proceed as far as the Great Crossing, and construct forts at the most advantageous situations as they advance

  • George Washington letter to Henry Bouquet.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 2 August 1758

    The matters, of which we spoke relative to the roads, have, since our parting, been the subject of my closest reflection ; and, so far am I from altering my opinion, that, the more time and attention I bestow, the more I am confirmed in it

  • George Washington letter to Francis Halket.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 2 August 1758

    I am just returned from a conference with Colonel Bouquet. I find him fixed, I think I may say unalterably fixed, to lead you a new way to the Ohio, through a road, every inch of which is to be cut at this advanced season

  • George Washington letter to Henry Bouquet.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 18 August 1758

    I am favored with yours of yesterday, intimating a probability of my proceeding with a body of troops, on General Braddock's road, and desiring me to retain for that purpose a month's provisions at this place

  • George Washington letter to unknown.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 21 August 1758

    Twenty-five Catawbas came here this evening, and the convoy may be expected the day after to-morrow, as it was at PearsalPs last night.

  • George Washington letter to John Robinson.

    Fort Cumberland, MD - 1 September 1758

    That appearance of glory, which we had once in view, that hope, that laudable ambition of serving our country, and meriting its applause, are now no more ; all is dwindled into ease, sloth, and fatal inactivity.

  • George Washington letter to John Forbes.

    Raystown, PA - 8 October 1758

    I offer these plans to your consideration. They express my thoughts respecting a line of march through a country covered with woods, and how that line of march may be formed quickly

  • George Washington letter to Francis Fauquier.

    Loyal Hanna, PA - 30 October 1758

    I am sorry to inform you, that, upon reviewing the six companies of my regiment at this place, which had been separated from me since my last, I found them deficient in the necessaries contained in the enclosed return.

  • George Washington letter to John Forbes.

    Chestnut Ridge, PA - 15 November 1758

    An express from Colonel Armstrong affords me an opportunity of informing you, that we arrived here about four o'clock this afternoon.

  • George Washington letter to John Forbes.

    Bushy Run, PA - 17 November 1758

    After the most constant labor from daybreak till night, we were able to open the road only as far as this place, about six miles from our last camp.

  • George Washington letter to John Forbes.

    Armstong's Camp, PA - 18 November 1758

    I thought it expedient to halt here till three in the morning, when I shall begin to march with one thousand men, leaving Colonel Armstrong and five hundred more in this camp

  • George Washington letter to Francis Fauquier.

    Fort Duquesne, PA - 28 November 1758

    I have the pleasure to inform you, that Fort Duquesne, or the ground rather on which it stood, was possessed by his Majesty's troops on the 25th instant. The enemy, after letting us get within a day's march of the place, burned the fort, and ran away

  • George Washington letter to Francis Fauquier.

    Loyal Hanna, PA - 2 December 1758

    The General has, in his letters, told you what garrison he proposed to leave at Fort Duquesne, but the want of provisions rendered it impossible to leave more than two hundred men in all

  • George Washington letter to Francis Fauquier.

    Winchester, VA - 9 December 1758

    Reason, nay, common humanity itself points out, that some respite should be granted to troops returning from every toil and hardship, that cold, hunger, and fatigue can inflict, and I hope your sentiments correspond wit mine.

  • George Washington letter to John Forbes.

    Williamsburg, VA - 30 December 1758

    Captain M c Neil, who commanded the first Virginia regiment in my absence, committed an error, I am informed, at Raystown, in confining Mr. Hoops, the commissary.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Cary.

    Williamsburg, VA - 1 May 1759

    I shall continue to make you the same consignments of tobacco as usual, and will endeavour to increase them in proportion as I find myself and the estate benefited thereby.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Cary.

    , VA - 12 June 1759

    In my last, among other things, I desired you would send me, besides a small octavo volume, the best system now extant of agriculture.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Cary.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 20 September 1759

    I am now, I believe, fixed at this seat with an agreeable partner for life, and I hope to find more happiness in retirement, than I ever experienced amidst the wide and bustling world.

  • George Washington letter to Richard Washington.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 10 August 1760

    The French are so well drubbed, and seem so much humbled in America, that I apprehend our generals will find it no difficult matter to reduce Canada to our obedience this summer.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Mackenzie.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 20 November 1760

    For, Sir, with not more pleasure than truth, I can declare to you and the world, that while I had the honor of commanding the regiment, your conduct, both as an officer and a gentleman, was unexceptionable

  • George Washington letter to Richard Washington.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 14 July 1761

    The entire conquest of Canada, and of the French in most parts of North America, being a story too stale to relate in these days, we are often at a loss for something with which to fill our letters.

  • George Washington letter to Richard Washington.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 20 October 1761

    I have in appearance been very near my last breath. My indisposition increased upon me, and I fell into a very low and dangerous state. I once thought the grim king would certainly master my utmost efforts

  • George Washington letter to Robert Cary.

    Williamsburg, VA - 3 November 1761

    Our Assembly is at present convened to grant supplies for carrying on the war against the Cherokee Indians, should they choose to continue it

  • George Washington letter to Robert Stewart.

    Williamsburg, VA - 2 May 1763

    Signing the definitive treaty seems to be the only piece of news, which prevails here at present, and diffuses general joy.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Stewart.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 13 August 1763

    Another tempest has arisen upon our frontiers, and the alarm spread wider than ever. In short, the inhabitants are so apprehensive of danger, that no families remain above the Conococheague road, and many are gone below it.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Cary.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 13 February 1764

    We have been curiously entertained, of late, with the description of an engine lately constructed, I believe, in Switzerland, and which has undergone some improvements in England, for taking up trees by the roots.

  • George Washington letter to William Crawford.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 21 September 1767

    I then desired the favor of you ... to look me out a tract of about fifteen hundred, two thousand, or more acres somewhere in your neighbourhood

  • George Washington letter to William Ramsay.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 29 January 1769

    I should be glad, if you have no other objection to it than the expense, if you would send him to that college, as soon as convenient, and depend on me for twentyfive pounds a year for his support

  • George Washington letter to Botetourte.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 15 April 1770

    By the extracts, which your Excellency did me the honor to enclose, I perceive, that the petitioners propose to begin opposite to the mouth of the Scioto River

  • George Washington letter to John Murray.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 15 June 1771

    The very obliging offer your Lordship was pleased to make, the day I left Williamsburg, in behalf of the officers and soldiers, who, under the faith of government, lay claim to two hundred thousand acres of land

  • George Washington letter to Johnathan Boucher.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 9 July 1771

    In my last I informed you, that the friends (I do not by this confine myself to the relations only) of Mr. Custis were divided in opinion, as to the propriety of his travelling

  • George Washington letter to George Mercer.

    Williamsburg, VA - 7 November 1771

    Since you first left this country, I have been favored with two letters from you ; one of them serving to enter your own, and the claims of Captains Stobo and Vanbraam, to part of the two hundred thousand acres of land

  • George Washington letter to William Edwards.

    , VA - 25 March 1773

    Mr. Wood, the bearer of this, is a gentleman of Virginia, going upon a tour to Florida. He proposes, before his return, to explore some of the ungranted lands in your government

  • George Washington letter to Benedict Calvert.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 3 April 1773

    My son-in-law and ward, Mr. Custis, has, as I have been informed, paid his addresses to your second daughter, and, having made some progress in her affections, has solicited her in marriage.

  • George Washington letter to John Murray.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 13 April 1773

    I beg the favor of your Lordship to inform me, therefore, as nearly as you can, of the precise time you will do me the honor of calling here, that I may get ready accordingly, and give notice of it to Mr. Crawford

  • George Washington letter to Cooper.

    New York, NY - 31 May 1773

    Enclosed you have a set of bills for one hundred pounds sterling, which please to set at the prevailing exchange, and retain the money in your own hands to answer Mr. Custis's expenses at college

  • George Washington letter to William Crawford.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 25 September 1773

    I have heard, .... that his Lordship will grant patents for lands lying below the Scioto, to the officers and soldiers, who claim under the proclamation of October, 1763.

  • George Washington letter to John Murray.

    Williamsburg, VA - 2 November 1773

    I take the liberty of addressing your Excellency on the subject of the lands, which the gentlemen conceive themselves entitled to under his Majesty's bounty of October, 1763.

  • George Washington letter to Cooper.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 13 December 1773

    The favorable account, which you were pleased to transmit to me, of Mr. Custis's conduct at college, gave me very great satisfaction. I hoped to have felt an increase of it by his continuance at that place

  • George Washington letter to James Tilghman.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 0 February 1774

    Interested as well as political motives render it necessary for me to seat the lands, which I have patented on the Ohio, in the cheapest, most expeditious, and effectual manner.

  • George Washington letter to Henry Riddell.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 22 February 1774

    Mr. Young, hearing me express a desire of importing Palatines to settle on my lands on the Ohio, tells me, that, in discoursing of this matter in your company, you suggested an expedient, which might probably be attended with success

  • George Washington letter to Edward Snickers.

    Williamsburg, VA - 16 June 1774

    Enclosed you will receive Mr. Hughes's warrant in his own right, for two thousand acres of land, the getting of which, at this time, he must look upon as a very great favor, as the Governor has dispensed with two positive instructions to oblige him.

  • George Washington letter to John West.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 13 January 1775

    two things are essentially necessary in the man to whom this charge is committed, a capacity of judging with propriety of measures proper to be taken in the government of a youth, and leisure sufficient to attend to the execution of these measures.

  • George Washington letter to John Washington.

    Richmond, VA - 25 March 1775

    I had like to have forgotten to express my entire approbation of the laudable pursuit you are engaged in, of training an independent company.

  • George Washington letter to William Fairfax.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 May 1775

    Before this letter will come to hand, you must undoubtedly have received an account of the engagement in the Massachusetts Bay, between the ministerial troops... and the provincials of that government.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 1 March 1777

    I have taken the liberty to trouble you with this hint, as sometimes things the most obvious escape attention. If you agree with me in sentiment, you will easily fall upon the most proper mode for answering the purpose.

  • George Washington letter to Aaron Burr.

    Ny - 28 October 1778

    You, in my opinion, carry your ideas of delicacy too far when you propose to drop your pay while the recovery of your health necessarily requires your absence from the service.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 0 April 1779

    If, under this sanction, I should step beyond the line you would wish to draw, and suggest ideas or ask questions which are improper to be answered, you hare only to pass them by in silence.

  • George Washington letter to Aaron Burr.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 3 April 1779

    Perfectly satisfied that no consideration save a desire to reestablish your health could induce you to leave the service, I cannot therefore withhold my consent.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 14 April 1779

    The circumstance of which you have obliged me with a communication, is among a number of other instances of the unfriendly views which have governed a certain gentleman from a very early period.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 10 May 1779

    To me it appears that our affairs are in a very delicate situation ; and what is not the least to be lamented is, that many people think they are in a very flourishing way ; and seem in a great measure insensible to the danger with which we are threa

  • George Washington letter to unknown.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 19 May 1779

    It is much to be regretted that the pleasure of obeying the first emotions in favour of misfortune is not always in our power.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    West Point, NY - 7 October 1779

    Among the number of your friends, permit me also to congratulate you, and my country, on your late honourable and important appointment.

  • George Washington letter to Benjamin Tallmadge.

    New Windsor, NY - 8 April 1781

    The success of the proposed enterprise, must depend on the absence of the British fleet, the secrecy of the attempt, and a knowledge of the exact situation of the enemy.

  • George Washington letter to John Laurens.

    New Windsor, NY - 9 April 1781

    several interesting events have happened ; some favorable, others adverse. Among the former may be reckoned Morgan's brilliant action with Tarleton ; among the latter, the advantages gained by Lord Cornwallis over General Greene.

  • George Washington letter to Jean Baptiste De Vimeur.

    New Windsor, NY - 10 April 1781

    We are greatly indebted to the Chevalier Destouches for the disposition he shows to undertake the expedition to Penobscot, and to you for your readiness to furnish a detachment of troops

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    New Windsor, NY - 11 April 1781

    While I give you credit for the manoeuvre by which you removed the British ships from before Annapolis, I am sorry, as matters are circumstanced, that you have put yourself so much further from the point

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    New Windsor, NY - 14 April 1781

    The contingencies appeared to me so remote, in the conversations I had with Count De Rochambeau, that I could not justify myself in withdrawing a detachment already so far advanced

  • George Washington letter to Johnathan Trumball.

    New Windsor, NY - 16 April 1781

    Colonel Harrison, who has acted as my secretary since the beginning of 1776, has accepted an honorable and profitable civil appointment in the State of Maryland, and is gone to enjoy it.

  • George Washington letter to Nathanael Greene.

    New Windsor, NY - 18 April 1781

    Your private letter of the 18th ultimo came safe to hand. Although the honors of the field did not fall to your lot, I am convinced you deserved them.

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    New Windsor, NY - 21 April 1781

    Though the situation of southern affairs would not permit me to recall your corps to this army, yet it was with great reluctance I could resolve upon seeing you separated from head-quarters.

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    New Windsor, NY - 22 April 1781

    I have received your several letters, and am extremely concerned at the temper of your detachment, and the desertions that are taking place.

  • George Washington letter to George Clark.

    New Windsor, NY - 25 April 1781

    At the request of Governor Jefferson, I have already given orders to the commandant at Fort Pitt to afford you every assistance in his power, in the prosecution of your intended expedition.

  • George Washington letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    New Windsor, NY - 27 April 1781

    The officers of the line contend, without having reference to particular persons, that it is a hardship and reflection upon them to introduce brevet officers into commands, of some permanence

  • George Washington letter to Benjamin Tallmadge.

    New Windsor, NY - 30 April 1781

    Besides these, you are also sensible there are many things upon a smaller scale, which are necessary to be reported, and that whatever intelligence is communicated ought to be, not in general terms, but in detail, and with the greatest precision.

  • George Washington letter to Jean Baptiste De Vimeur.

    New Windsor, NY - 30 April 1781

    I assure your Excellency, that I feel extreme pain at the occasion of that part of your letter of the 26th instant, which relates to an intercepted letter of mine published by the enemy.

  • George Washington letter to Lund Washington.

    New Windsor, NY - 30 April 1781

    I am very sorry to hear of your loss. I am a little sorry to hear of my own ; but that which gives me most concern is, that you should go on board the enemy's vessels, and furnish them with refreshments.

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    New Windsor, NY - 4 May 1781

    A false idea, arising from the consideration of his being my steward, and in that character more the trustee and guardian of my property than the representative of my honor, has misled his judgment and plunged him into error

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    New Windsor, NY - 5 May 1781

    and am extremely rejoiced to learn, that the spirit of discontent had so entirely subsided, and that the parade of desertion would probably be totally stopped among the troops under your command.

  • George Washington letter to Meshech Weare.

    New Windsor, NY - 10 May 1781

    From the post of Saratoga to that of Dobbs's Ferry inclusive, I believe there is not (by the returns and reports I have received) at this moment one day's supply of meat for the army on hand.

  • George Washington letter to John Sullivan.

    New Windsor, NY - 11 May 1781

    This, and a recent instance in the Pennsylvania regiment of artillery in proof of the absolute necessity of adopting some mode, by which the whole army may be bound, and a stop thereby be put to those disputes, which keep it in a continual state of d

  • George Washington letter to Benjamin Lincoln.

    New Windsor, NY - 11 May 1781

    so great are my apprehensions, on the score of provisions, that I am sending General Heath purposely to the eastern States to represent our distresses, and to endeavour to fix a plan for our regular supply in future.

  • George Washington letter to De Barras.

    New Windsor, NY - 14 May 1781

    Give me leave to congratulate you on your safe arrival, and your appointment to the command of his Most Christian Majesty's fleet and sea forces upon these coasts.

  • George Washington letter to Ezra Styles.

    New Windsor, NY - 15 May 1781

    For the honor conferred on me by the President and Fellows of the University of Yale College, by the degree of Doctor of Laws, my warmest thanks are offered

  • George Washington letter to Paul Jones.

    New Windsor, NY - 15 May 1781

    My partial acquaintance with either our naval or commercial affairs makes it altogether impossible for me to account for the unfortunate delay of those articles of military stores and clothing

  • George Washington letter to Alexander Scammell.

    New Windsor, NY - 17 May 1781

    I have received intelligence, that a party of the enemy are establishing themselves at or near Fort Lee, and building a blockhouse, or some kind of work.

  • George Washington letter to Chevalier De La Luzerne.

    Weathersfield, NY - 23 May 1781

    The letter, which I have the honor to enclose from the Count De Rochambeau, will, I imagine, inform you of the intended march of the French army towards the North River, and of the destination of the King's squadron now in the harbour of Newport

  • George Washington letter to Meshech Weare.

    Weathersfield, NY - 24 May 1781

    In consequence of a conference held between the Count De Rochambeau and myself at this place, the French army will march, as soon as circumstances will admit, and form a junction with the American army upon the North River.

  • George Washington letter to Elias Dayton.

    New Windsor, NY - 28 May 1781

    The late accounts from New York are mysterious and perplexing, but they at any rate demand that we should be in readiness to move.

  • George Washington letter to Louis Duportail.

    New Windsor, NY - 28 May 1781

    I have only to request, therefore, that you will be pleased to make the estimates of the articles in your department necessary for the operation

  • George Washington letter to John Sullivan.

    New Windsor, NY - 29 May 1781

    No arguments were necessary to convince me of the very great public utility, which would result from the success of the plan you proposed laying before Congress.

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    New Windsor, NY - 31 May 1781

    Your conduct upon every occasion meets my approbation, but in none more than in your refusing to hold a correspondence with Arnold.

  • George Washington letter to Nathanael Greene.

    New Windsor, NY - 1 June 1781

    The difficulties, which you daily encounter and surmount with your small force, add not a little to your reputation

  • George Washington letter to Robert Morris.

    New Windsor, NY - 4 June 1781

    I felt a most sensible pleasure when I heard of your acceptance of the late appointment of Congress to regulate the finances of this country.

  • George Washington letter to Jean Baptiste De Vimeur.

    New Windsor, NY - 4 June 1781

    I had last evening the honor of receiving your favor of the 31st of May by the Duke De Lauzun, who informs me, that he is authorized by your Excellency and Count de Barras to enter into a free communication with me upon the subject of the council of

  • George Washington letter to James Clinton.

    New Windsor, NY - 5 June 1781

    The six companies of Van Schaick's regiment have since sailed. Hazen's will follow to-morrow.

  • George Washington letter to John Mathews.

    New Windsor, NY - 7 June 1781

    I am very sorry for the disagreeable situation of our suffering soldiery at Charleston, and wish they could be relieved without adding to the pressure under which we at present given.

  • George Washington letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    New Windsor, NY - 8 June 1781

    The progress, which the enemy are making in Virginia, is very alarming, not only to the State immediately invaded, but to all the rest

  • George Washington letter to Chevalier De La Luzerne.

    New Windsor, NY - 13 June 1781

    Having been made acquainted by the Count De Rochambeau, with the design of the Count de Grasse to come to this coast with his fleet, I cannot forbear expressing my ardent wishes, that a body of land forces might also attend this naval armament

  • George Washington letter to Jean Baptiste De Vimeur.

    New Windsor, NY - 13 June 1781

    I flatter myself, that the whole convoy will arrive in safety in some of the eastern ports, as I believe the British ships are all cruising off the Hook.

  • George Washington letter to George Clinton.

    New Windsor, NY - 21 June 1781

    I have just received a letter from Brigadier-General Clinton, enclosing the examination of two prisoners who were taken lately by one of his scouts ; from whence it appears the enemy in Canada have not made any movements in force

  • George Washington letter to William Irvine.

    New Windsor, NY - 23 June 1781

    I can easily conceive the disappointment and mortification you have suffered, upon finding the flattering prospects of filling your line so unexpectedly blasted

  • George Washington letter to Jean Baptiste De Vimeur.

    New Windsor, NY - 24 June 1781

    I have the pleasure to observe the progress you make in the march of the troops under your command, and your intentions to come to my camp in person from Hartford.

  • George Washington letter to John Stark.

    New Windsor, NY - 25 June 1781

    Upon finding it necessary, for the operations of the campaign, to recall the Continental troops from the northward, I have ordered six hundred militia from the counties of Berkshire and Hampshire to that quarter

  • George Washington letter to Jean Baptiste De Vimeur.

    Peekskill, NY - 27 June 1781

    It would have given me the greatest pleasure could I have made it convenient to meet you at Newtown ; but independently of many arrangements, which are necessary at the first taking of the field, I am detained

  • George Washington letter to Robert Morris.

    Peekskill, NY - 28 June 1781

    Your opinion of the absolute necessity of a repeal of all Under laws, before a new species of paper, though upon ever so good an establishment, will gain credit with the public, is certainly founded upon reason

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    Peekskill, NY - 29 June 1781

    I have since that heard a thousand vague reports of your situation, and that of the enemy, but none of them satisfactory.

  • George Washington letter to David Cobb.

    Peekskill, NY - 30 June 1781

    Its object is to inform the Count, that I have in contemplation a very sudden surprise of some post of the enemy, which will be of very great importance in our operations

  • George Washington letter to George Clinton.

    Peekskill, NY - 30 June 1781

    In the fullest confidence I inform you, that I intend to make an attempt by surprise upon the enemy's posts on the north end of York Island, on Monday night.

  • George Washington letter to Waterbury.

    Peekskill, NY - 30 June 1781

    You will immediately on the receipt of this be pleased to collect as many men of your command as you possibly can, and march them from the place of rendezvous, so as to form a junction, without fail, with Colonel Sheldon

  • George Washington letter to Waterbury.

    Peekskill, NY - 1 July 1781

    As the Duke will be a stranger to that part of the country, which is to be the scene of your operations, it will be in your power to give him much assistance and information

  • George Washington letter to Benjamin Lincoln.

    Peekskill, NY - 1 July 1781

    My ideas, as to the most probable mode of attaining this object, have been minutely detailed in the several conversations which we have had upon the subject, and you have been furnished with such papers as I have been able to collect

  • George Washington letter to Jean Baptiste De Vimeur.

    Peekskill, NY - 2 July 1781

    I think it will be very well for your Excellency to proceed to-morrow to North Castle, where you will continue until you assemble your whole force

  • George Washington letter to Henry Knox.

    Peekskill, NY - 2 July 1781

    The arrangement you have made, for the periods of transportation of the heavy stores from Philadelphia, agrees perfectly with my ideas of the matter

  • George Washington letter to Jean Baptiste De Vimeur.

    Valentines Hill, NY - 3 July 1781

    The operations of this day are over, and I am sorry to say, that I have not had the happiness to succeed to my wishes, although I think very essential benefit will result to our future operations from the opportunity

  • George Washington letter to Jean Baptiste De Vimeur.

    White Plains, NY - 4 July 1781

    I am much inclined to wish you to give them one more day's rest in your present quarters, and the more so, as there is now no real occasion for making an uncommon degree of haste.

  • George Washington letter to William Alexander.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 11 July 1781

    While I am with the detachment of the army below, you will remain in command here. Your principal attention will be paid to the good order of the camp, and the security of the baggage and stores left in it.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Morris.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 13 July 1781

    I beg you to be assured, that I never can think your correspondence tedious or troublesome. Duty as well as inclination will always prompt me to listen with pleasure to your observations upon the state of our public affairs

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 15 July 1781

    I sincerely congratulate you on the favorable turn of affairs announced in your last, and I hope you will be enabled to maintain that superiority, which you seem to be gaining over Lord Cornwallis.

  • George Washington letter to Richard Lee.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 15 July 1781

    The distresses of Virginia I am but too well acquainted with ; but the plan you have suggested as a relief for it is, in my judgment, a greater proof of your unbounded confidence in me

  • George Washington letter to De Barras.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 21 July 1781

    I have no doubt but the reasons which induce you to decline the removal of the squadron under your command to the Chesapeake at this time are founded in propriety

  • George Washington letter to Samuel Huntington.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 25 July 1781

    I have been honored with your favor of the 10th, announcing your resignation of the chair of Congress and the election of Mr. McKean to that important station.

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 30 July 1781

    I am convinced, that your desire to be with this army arises principally from a wish to be actively useful. You will not, therefore, regret your stay in Virginia until matters are reduced to a greater degree of certainty

  • George Washington letter to Nathanael Greene.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 30 July 1781

    By our movements in this quarter, and the main army taking a position near New York, and making every preparation for a serious attempt upon that place, we have already produced a happy effect

  • George Washington letter to Meshech Weare.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 2 August 1781

    I regret being obliged to inform your Excellency, that I find myself at this late period very little stronger than I was when the army first moved out of their quarters.

  • George Washington letter to Robert Morris.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 2 August 1781

    It seems reduced almost to a certainty, that the enemy will reinforce New York with part of their troops from Virginia. In that case, the attempt against the former must be laid aside

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 15 August 1781

    I cannot learn that any troops have yet arrived at New York from Virginia. A fleet of twenty sail came in last Saturday with troops, but they are said to be Hessian recruits from Europe.

  • George Washington letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 16 August 1781

    As the remaining part of Colonel Cortlandt's regiment is now ordered to join the main army, I have given directions to General Clinton to leave with you a small guard of men

  • George Washington letter to Robert Morris.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 17 August 1781

    Besides the provision necessary at the Head of Elk to carry the troops down the bay, a very considerable quantity will be wanted in Virginia.

  • George Washington letter to Alexandre De Grasse.

    Phillipsburg, NY - 17 August 1781

    In consequence of the despatches received from your Excellency by the frigate Concorde, it has been judged expedient to give up for the present the enterprise against New York, and turn our attention towards the south

  • George Washington letter to William Heath.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 19 August 1781

    The security of West Point and the posts in the Highlands is to be considered the first object of your attention. In order to effect this, you will make such dispositions as in your judgement the circumstances shall from time to time require

  • George Washington letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    Kings Ferry, NY - 21 August 1781

    the troops destined for the southern quarter are now in motion. The American detachment is already on the west side of the Hudson.

  • George Washington letter to Jean Baptiste De Vimeur.

    Kings Ferry, NY - 21 August 1781

    I am very sorry for the difficulties and impediments, which fall in the way of your march, and hope they will decrease as you proceed.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Verplancks Point, NY - 18 October 1782

    We have now passed another campaign, and no very important occurrence has intervened on this side the Atlantic.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 27 September 1785

    It gave me great pleasure to hear of your appointment as secretary of the United States for the department of foreign affairs ; a happier choice in my opinion could not have been made

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 3 September 1788

    With peculiar pleasure I now congratulate you on the success of your labours to obtain an unconditional ratification of the proposed constitution in the Convention of your State

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    New York, NY - 13 October 1789

    To thank you for the interesting communications contained in those letters, and for the pains you have taken to procure me a watch, is all, or nearly all, I shall attempt in this letter

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    New York, NY - 13 October 1789

    My letter to you, herewith enclosed, will give you the credence necessary to enable you to do the business, which it commits to your management, and which I am persuaded you will readily undertake.

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    New York, NY - 13 October 1789

    It being important to both countries, that the treaty of peace between Great Britain and the United States should be observed and performed with perfect and mutual good faith, and that a treaty of commerce should be concluded by them

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    New York, NY - 7 July 1790

    and, as far as your communications with the British Government had gone, to assure you of my entire approbation of your conduct respecting the former.

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 28 July 1791

    The change of systems, which have so long prevailed in Europe, will, undoubtedly, affect us in a degree proportioned to our political or commercial connexions with the several nations of it.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 September 1791

    The indisposition, and consequent absence from Mount Vernon, of my nephew, Major Washington, to whom the care of my private business is intrusted, makes it indispensably necessary for me to go home before the meeting of Congress.

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 October 1792

    gloomy indeed appears the situation of France at this juncture. But it is hardly probable that even you, who are on the spot, can say with any precision how these things will terminate

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 March 1793

    And unwise should we be in the extreme, to involve ourselves in the contests of European nations, where our weight could be but small, though the loss to ourselves would be certain.

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Baltimore, MD - 19 June 1794

    The difficulty, under existing circumstances, of knowing what to write to you, had determined me to write nothing

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 25 June 1794

    The sole object of the enclosed letter was to evince to you, that, notwithstanding your recall, you held the same place in my estimation that you did before it happened.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 August 1794

    On this irregular and high-handed proceeding of Mr. Simcoe, which is no longer masked, I would rather hear what the ministry of Great Britain will say, than pronounce my own sentiments thereon.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 November 1794

    That the self-created societies which have spread themselves over this country, have been labouring incessantly to sow the seeds of distrust, jealousy, and of course discontent, thereby hoping to effect some revolution in the government, is not unkno

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 December 1794

    As I expected, and as you have been informed the result would probably be, so it has happened, that the western insurrection has terminated highly honourable for this country

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 September 1795

    You will have learned from the public gazettes, and through other more authentic channels, that all that rested with me to do, to give ratification to the treaty between this country and Great Britain, is already accomplished.

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 December 1795

    My information with respect to the general disposition of the people, accords with yours; and I have little doubt of a perfect amelioration of sentiment, alter the present fermentation (which is not only subsiding, but changing) has evaporated a litt

  • George Washington letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 March 1796

    The purport of it is pleasing ; but the conduct of the British armed vessels in the West Indies is intolerable beyond all forbearance.