Gouverneur Morris Letters for the years 1772 thru 1816

Gouverneur Morris

Gouverneur Morris wrote 206 Letters from a total of 20 locations including , NY, New York, NY, and Fishkill, NY. Gouverneur Morris wrote a total of 30 people including George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson. Most of Gouverneur Morris's letters were written in the year 1793. Several other letters were written in 1792 and 1790. Who did Gouverneur Morris know? View Gouverneur Morris's social graph.

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  • sponsored contentGouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Penn.

    New York, NY - 20 May 1774

    You have heard, and you will hear, a great deal about politics, and in the heap of chaff you may find some grains of good sense. Believe me, Sir, freedom and religion are only watch words.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to William Smith.

    , NY - 20 February 1772

    I have thoughts of sailing for London in the Miller, and I beg your sentiments with the same candor, that I deliver my own.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Penn.

    New York, NY - 7 January 1774

    Politics I dislike, and only look on with pity, while the madness of so many is made the gain of so few

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Sarah Gouverneur.

    Fishkill, NY - 19 December 1776

    We all sustain in her a great loss, but you in particular, who are thus bereft of the companion of your age, must feel it most severely.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Abraham Yates.

    Fort Edward, NY - 16 July 1777

    I arrived here yesterday noon, and last evening had some little conversation with the General and others upon the state of our affairs. They are far from being such as could be wished.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Abraham Yates.

    Saratoga, NY - 17 July 1777

    Fort George was destroyed yesterday afternoon, previous to which the provisions, stores, and batteaux, were removed, and this morning about ten o'clock the last of them passed us

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Abraham Yates.

    Moses Creek, NY - 23 July 1777

    It was determined upon to leave the ground occupied by our advanced posts, upon the road to Fort Anne and Fort George, and retire to Fort Edward in the way to this place, having previously removed everything.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Kingston, NY - 27 August 1777

    You will readily believe, that we were not pleased at this resolution, and I assure you for my own part, I felt exceedingly distressed at your removal, just when changing fortune began to declare in our favor.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Kingston, NY - 18 September 1777

    I am confident that the proper advantages will not be taken of Burgoyne's situation. We have no chance, I fear, in that quarter from management.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Valley Forge, PA - 1 February 1778

    Congress have sent me here, in conjunction with some other gentlemen, to regulate their army, and in truth not a little regulation hath become necessary. Our quartermaster and commissary departments are in the most lamentable situation.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Sarah Gouverneur.

    York Town, PA - 17 April 1778

    I received great pain from being informed, that you are distressed on my account. Be of good cheer, I pray you. I have all that happiness, which flows from conscious rectitude.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    York Town, PA - 18 April 1778

    We have determined to send Gates to Hudson River, where he is to command very largely. But he is to receive instructions, which shall be proper.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Yorktown, PA - 28 April 1778

    I choose that my friends should write freely, and those who know me must know that such freedoms need no apology. I never thought the person you allude to so steady as could be wished. We have all of us our weak sides ; would to God that were the wor

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    York Town, PA - 21 May 1778

    the bulk of us bipeds know well how to balance solid pudding against empty praise. There are other things, my dear Sir, besides virtue, which are their own reward.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    York Town, PA - 27 May 1778

    I have a word to say to you on the subject of promotion, which we have just now finished, or rather unfinished, at least if that matter was before in an unfinished situation.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 August 1778

    I was in your debt. It is my fate always to be so with my friends. But, believe me, my heart owes nothing.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 October 1778

    The conduct, which the enemy may pursue, with relation to us, is not quite decided. But I have not a doubt, that their efforts during the next campaign will be chiefly towards our frontiers, with a view to weary us into submission.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Nathanael Greene.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 December 1781

    That you were not chosen I do truly lament, for I can with great truth assure you, that I know not a man who is in my opinion equal to the office except yourself.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 January 1783

    Men are forgetful, and therefore it will be well by timely declarations of your sentiments to recall your conduct while in Congress. You and I differ about the western country, but you and your sovereign are of the same option.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Nathanael Greene.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 February 1783

    The approach of peace cannot but give very serious thoughts to every officer and soldier of the American army. The promises made by the public will, if performed, be of beneficial importance, and, if broken, extremely injurious.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 September 1783

    The British employ themselves about the evacuation of New York, but that business goes on slowly. I am however informed from tolerable authority, that they will be gone by the beginning of November.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 January 1784

    Your attachment to America, when removed from it, is the old story of travellers ; but when it comes from one in whose feelings we feel an interest, decies repetita placebit.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 October 1787

    The States eastward of New York appear to be almost unanimous in favor of the new Constitution, (for I make no account of the dissension in Rhode Island.)

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Morrisania, NY - 12 November 1788

    After many unforeseen delays, I am about shortly to take my departure from Philadelphia for the kingdom of France, and I expect to visit both Holland and England.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Moustier.

    Paris, FRA - 23 February 1789

    IF I should attempt, my dear Sir, to thank you for the kind introductions you have given me to your friends, I could not succeed in giving expression to my feelings.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to .

    Paris, FRA - 25 February 1789

    From Holland I shall perhaps be obliged to go to England. But I contemplate, in all cases, a return to this capital, as speedily as possible ; and from hence I wish to go to Madrid.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 3 March 1789

    Since that period, there are advices here, which announce the re-establishment of the King of Great Britain's health ; but from a letter I have just now received from the Marquis de la Luzerne, I am disposed to doubt the fact.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 4 March 1789

    my present opinion is, that until some time after the States- General shall have assembled, this government will offer little or nothing for the contemplation of your department.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jones.

    Paris, FRA - 18 April 1789

    I am pretty well convinced that I am not fit for a traveller and yet I thought otherwise when I left America.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 29 April 1789

    Monsieur de Lafayette is since returned from his political campaign in Auvers-ne, crowned with success. He had to contend with prejudices, and the interests of his order

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    Paris, FRA - 1 July 1789

    I am too much occupied to find time for the use of a cipher, and in effect, the government here is so much occupied with their own affairs, that in transmitting to you a letter under an envelope, there is no risk.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to William Carmichael.

    Paris, FRA - 4 July 1789

    A day now at length auspicious, since by the establishment of our new constitution we have the fair prospect of enjoying those good things, for which we have had so hard a contest.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Dieppe, FRA - 31 July 1789

    I will also communicate a matter, which Mr. Jefferson was not yet informed of, and which I could not tell him, because I was forbidden to mention it to any person here.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    Paris, FRA - 16 October 1789

    I am convinced, that the proposed Constitution cannot serve for the government of this country ; that the National Assembly, late the object of enthusiastic attachment, will soon be treated with disrespect

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Paul Jones.

    Paris, FRA - 8 November 1789

    Mr Jefferson is, you know, departed, with intention to return next spring. All the accounts received from our country are flattering. Freedom, order, and justice are established.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 January 1790

    Yesterday I went to dine with the Count de Montmorin, and expressed to him my wish that France might seize the present moment to establish a liberal system of commercial policy for her Colonies.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 January 1790

    In another letter of this date, I have mentioned a part of yesterday's conversation with the Count de Montmorin. That part of it, which I am now to communicate, is for yourself alone.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 January 1790

    I shall, in consequence, set off for London as soon as I possibly can.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 January 1790

    Yesterday I went to dine with the Count de Montmorin, and expressed to him my wish that France might seize the present moment to establish a liberal system of commercial policy for her colonies.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 24 January 1790

    It gave me very sincere pleasure to learn from you the good tidings, which you communicate respecting our new form of government. I know that you are not liable to the dupery of false hopes and groundless expectations

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    Paris, FRA - 31 January 1790

    M. Necker, pressed for money, had listened to overtures for selling the debt of the United States, and mentioned the matter to some members of the National Assembly, by which means it became known to the principal Americans, and friends of America he

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to William Short.

    Paris, FRA - 20 February 1790

    You have seen the decree which has been made respecting tobacco, and which gives to French shipping a preference of above one hundred livres per ton over American.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francis Osborne.

    Covent Garden, ENG - 28 March 1790

    Mr Morris had the honor to wait upon his Grace, the Duke of Leeds, this morning, but had not that of seeing him.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 7 April 1790

    I assured him of our sincere disposition to be upon good terms, and then proceeded to mention those points in the treaty of peace which remained to be performed.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 13 April 1790

    My letter of the seventh will have communicated what passed with the Duke of Leeds respecting the business you committed to me.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 13 April 1790

    I am still waiting for intelligence from the Ministers, who (to judge by appearances) slumber profoundly upon the application made to them.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to William Short.

    London, ENG - 23 April 1790

    I think Colonel Hamilton's idea of obtaining money at four per cent is premature. Doubtless it will be practicable at a future day, when we do not want money

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francis Osborne.

    Covent Garden, ENG - 29 April 1790

    As your Grace seemed to be particularly pleased with the contents of that letter, I took the liberty to request that I might be speedily honored with the communication of your sentiments on the subjects of it.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francis Osborne.

    Covent Garden, ENG - 30 April 1790

    The candor, with which your Grace avows the intention to retard a fulfilment of such parts of the treaty as depend upon Great Britain, meets, as it merits, my utmost acknowledgment.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Chevalier Ternant.

    London, ENG - 0 May 1790

    If your friends speculate in the Assignates I wish them much success, but I incline to think that there will be more loss then gain in such speculations.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 1 May 1790

    It seems pretty clear, that they wish to evade a commercial treaty, but not peremptorily to reject it; and, therefore, I have construed into rejection his Grace's abstruse language, leaving him the option to give it a different interpretation.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 2 May 1790

    On Satur day, the seventeenth, I dined in company with Mr Fox. The state of French politics formed, of course, a large part of the conversation. The situation of other countries was then passed in review, and it became a question how far Britain migh

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Gilbert Du Motier Lafayette.

    London, ENG - 7 May 1790

    When this letter reaches your hands it will probably find you meditating on the situation of France, which is not perhaps enviable, but it is by no means so dreadful as would at first sight appear.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 29 May 1790

    The general opinion here is, that Spain will submit, and that Spain only is the object of this armament. But I hold a very different faith.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 3 July 1790

    I have heard nothing since from the Duke of Leeds. On the tenth of June the King prorogued the parliament, which was dissolved on the eleventh. The election will be completed in about ten days

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 16 August 1790

    You will have seen the declaration, and counter declaration, of the Spanish and British courts, exchanged at Madrid the twenty-fourth of last month. These leave the material ground of controversy in its original state, and the armaments go on with un

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 30 August 1790

    The situation of France, however, seems at first sight to preclude all effort. The national bank, which was in contemplation, has never taken effect.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francis Osborne.

    London, ENG - 10 September 1790

    In expectation of that reply, I have patiently waited in this city to the present hour, though called by many affairs to the continent. But my departure cannot be much longer delayed

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 18 September 1790

    Sweden being unsupported by her allies, and Russia having nothing to gain by farther fighting, but a part of the Finland deserts, not worth fighting for, they have struck a bargain of peace immediately

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to William Short.

    London, ENG - 18 September 1790

    It is perfectly natural that your opinions should differ from mine. There will ever be a difference of opinions on subjects, which do not admit of demonstration.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francis Osborne.

    London, ENG - 24 September 1790

    It appears, first, that the American ship was stopped on the high seas, and detained by a British vessel of war, which took away several of the crew, and kept one, who was a British subject.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 24 September 1790

    I have already had occasion to mention the impress of American seamen, to serve on board of British ships of war. The ministers seemed desirous of doing what was right, and of avoiding just ground of complaint

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 November 1790

    My last letter was of the twenty-fourth of September. Since that period, I have passed through Flanders and a part of Germany, and having coasted the Rhine to Strasburg, came thence to this city.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 November 1790

    The country I now inhabit, on which so many other countries depend, having sunk to absolute nothingness, has deranged the general state of things in every quarter

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 1 December 1790

    To begin then with our friend Lafayette, who has hitherto acted a splendid part. The King obeys but detests him. He obeys because he fears.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    London, ENG - 24 December 1790

    I am led to fear, that my conduct in regard to our impressed seamen has not been equally fortunate ; but I hope the interference will be excused.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    London, ENG - 28 December 1790

    In the afternoon of that day I received a note from Mr Burgess, appointing an hour on the twenty-fifth for an interview with the Duke of Leeds. I attended, but something or other kept his Grace away.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 26 February 1791

    Pardon me while on this chapter, for expressing my apprehension that the sale of western lands will not produce the present relief expected, and it will consume a valuable future resource.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 9 March 1791

    In the debate on this subject one of the Lameths gave it as his opinion, that America was not in a situation to be either sought or feared for some time to come.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 16 March 1791

    Since that period the Assembly have taken another step in the same disagreeable road. They have deprived all ships other than those built in France of the privilege of French bottoms.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 27 May 1791

    In a letter to Colonel Hamilton, of the 31st of January, 1790, I mentioned what had passed between M. Necker and me respecting the debt due by the United States to France

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Robert Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 16 July 1791

    The latest I have received from you is of the third of May. You will have heard, through various channels, of the King's escape from the Tuileries. By the bye, he was said to be in perfect liberty there

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Robert Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 20 July 1791

    My last was of the sixteenth. The riot of that day went off pretty easily, but the next morning two men were lanterned and mangled in the Parisian taste. This occasioned some little stir.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 30 September 1791

    The view which it gives of our prosperity as a nation swelled my bosom with emotions, which none can know but those who have experienced them.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 3 October 1791

    I mentioned to you from London, that Mr Walpole had been offered the place of Envoy Extraordinary to the United States, which he had refused.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Robert Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 10 October 1791

    The people of this city are become wonderfully fond of the King, and have a thorough contempt for the Assembly, who are, in general, what used to be called in Philadelphia, the blue stockings.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 22 October 1791

    Poor Lafayette ! Your letter for him must remain with me some time. His enemies here are as virulent as ever

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 27 December 1791

    I observe, that when a man purchases in France goods which are to be sold in England, he pays for those goods by the proceeds of bills drawn on England, and as he makes the acquisition of the goods with a view to the future sales

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 4 February 1792

    At the close of the session of the first National Assembly, a coalition was brought about between the Jacobins and the Quatre-vingt-neufs. It is proper to explain these terms.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Robert Morris.

    London, ENG - 15 February 1792

    This letter will be in reply to what you have been so kind as to write respecting my nomination as minister to the court of France.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 17 March 1792

    I was informed that you had nominated me as minister to the court of France, but the latest advices from America, which come down to the tenth of January, show that the Senate had not then made their decision.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    London, ENG - 21 March 1792

    I find that the King of France has appointed to the office of Foreign Affairs a Monsieur Dumouriez, and that it is considered as a sacrifice to the Jacobins. He is a bold, determined man.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    London, ENG - 6 April 1792

    Nothing can be more just, than your observations respecting the propriety of preserving silence as to the government of France ; and they are peculiarly applicable to the present state of things in that country.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to William Carmichael.

    Paris, FRA - 14 May 1792

    They have made the common mistake, that, to enjoy liberty, it is necessary only to demolish authority, and the common consequence results, viz. that the most ardent advocates for the revolution begin now to wish and pray, and even cry out for the est

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 10 June 1792

    My former letters have mentioned to you the indiscipline of the French armies, and the public prints will give you such facts on that head, as may tend to making up in your mind a solid judgment as to future events.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 10 June 1792

    On the next day I dined with M. Dumouriez, and delivered the letter from the President to the King, on his acceptance of the constitution, of which letter I had previously made a translation, to avoid mistakes of their agents, which are not uncommon.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 17 June 1792

    The ministry is changed rather sooner than I expected, that is to say, as to the totality. Messieurs Servan, Roland, and Claviere were dismissed by M. Dumouriez.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 1 July 1792

    According to your orders I sit down to render this day a state of my account, which will be but short, because I shall charge at present no contingencies.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Scipion Victor.

    Paris, FRA - 9 July 1792

    during the last session of Congress, although heavy duties were laid upon wines imported from other countries, no addition has been made to the duties paid by those of your country ; which amounts, in fact, to allowing them a premium

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 10 July 1792

    On Saturday, the seventh, a farce was acted in the Assembly, in which the principal performers played well their parts, and the King was duped according to custom. Things are now verging fast to the catastrophe of the play.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 1 August 1792

    In a former letter I mentioned that M. de Lafayette was about to commence an attack upon the Jacobin faction. I have not followed that business in my correspondence, because the Gazettes will furnish the most ample intelligence.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Pinckney.

    Paris, FRA - 13 August 1792

    An American has a stronger sympathy with this country than any other observer, and nourished as he is in the very bosom of liberty, he cannot but be deeply afflicted to see that in almost every event, this struggle must terminate in despotism.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 16 August 1792

    Since that period another revolution has been effected in this city. It was bloody. Success, which always makes friends, gives to the present order an air of greater unanimity than really exists.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    Paris, FRA - 17 August 1792

    I am still of opinion, that it is wise to multiply the scenes on which to display our credit. Those, who have lent money to a nation, naturally incline to speak well of that nation, first to justify the confidence they have placed, and next to increa

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 17 August 1792

    If I have not hitherto mentioned the application made to me by the foreign officers, who have certificates, whereof the interest is payable in this city, it has not been for want of sufficient reason, but because I daily hoped to have received some o

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 22 August 1792

    I suggested my idea, that the force commanded by M. de Lafayette would not be brought to immediate action, and that in such case he and his friends had nothing to hope for.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 30 August 1792

    I have mentioned to you, that I had not been able to adjust with the minister of Foreign Affairs the rate of exchange, which should govern the payments made, and making, in America, on account of our debt to France

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Lebrun.

    Paris, FRA - 1 September 1792

    You do me the honor to tell me, that I am able to fulfil the engagements entered into by Mr Short, relative to the eight hundred thousand dollars to be held in North America at your disposal

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to William Short.

    Paris, FRA - 9 September 1792

    Of all things I wish to steer clear of pecuniary transactions, because they involve a species of responsibility which is most irksome, and expose the agent to the chance of being called by every calumniator, to answer at the bar of public opinion.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 10 September 1792

    We have had one week of unchecked murders, in which some thousands have perished in this city. It began with between two and three hundred of the clergy

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Lebrun.

    Paris, FRA - 17 September 1792

    As to my personal opinions, Sir, they are of no importance in so serious an affair, but you may be sure, that I have never questioned the right of any people to govern themselves ac cording to their own pleasure.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 19 September 1792

    It gives me pain to write, and will, I am sure, give you pain to read, the distressful state of a country for which we have both a sincere regard.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 27 September 1792

    I think it is proper to mention to you now a circumstance relating to that conversation, because it may explain transactions connected therewith. I had good reason to believe, that a private speculation was at the bottom of the proposals made to me

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 23 October 1792

    Poor Lafayette ! Your letter for him must remain with me yet some time. His enemies here are as virulent as ever, and I can give you no better proof than this.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 23 October 1792

    I apprehend also that the United States will wish to see a little into the establishment of the new Republic, before they take any decided steps in relation to it.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Paris, FRA - 23 October 1792

    I cannot give you such desirable intelligence respecting the state of things here, as I might have done if the late revolution had not taken place, because I find my intercourse of necessity suspended

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    Paris, FRA - 24 October 1792

    You will have seen that the late constitution of this country has overset ; a natural accident to a thing, which was all sail and no ballast.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to William Carmichael.

    Paris, FRA - 5 November 1792

    When Mr Short was here, he talked of going to Madrid, but, from what cause I know not, appeared to me indecisive, and apprehensive, to a degree which was astonishing.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Adrienne Lafayette.

    Paris, FRA - 7 November 1792

    I know not the titles of the King of Prussia. These should be properly placed, you know, because monarchs are very sensitive on that subject.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Pinckney.

    Paris, FRA - 3 December 1792

    Success, as you will see, continues to crown the French arms, but it is not our trade to judge from success. We must observe the Civil, Moral, Religious and Political Institutions.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 21 December 1792

    When I mentioned supplies to St Domingo, I certainly meant that such supplies should be purchased by French agents in the United States, and that the money should be advanced by us in diminution of our debt

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    Paris, FRA - 24 December 1792

    You will have seen from the public prints the wonderful success of the French arms, arising from the following causes.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 28 December 1792

    As to that war, I am told that the British ultimatum is as follows. France shall deliver the royal family to such reigning branch of the Bourbons as the King may choose, and shall re call her troops from the countries they now occupy.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 1 January 1793

    Since that period, this government, perceiving that they had been wholly deceived respecting the British nation, have made advances towards conciliation.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to William Carmichael.

    Paris, FRA - 4 January 1793

    The Council here talk so highly to Great Britain that you, who know mankind, will conclude them to be afraid ; and this conclusion is not far from the truth.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 6 January 1793

    Dumouriez has been some days in Paris ; he stays at home under pretence of illness, but in fact to receive and consider the propositions of the different parties.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 10 January 1793

    Those who planned the revolution, which took place on the tenth of August, sought a person to head the attack, and found a M. Westermann, whose morals were far from exemplary.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 25 January 1793

    The late King of this country has been publicly executed. He died in a manner becoming his dignity. Mounting the scaffold, he expressed anew his forgiveness of those who persecuted him, and a prayer that his deluded people might be benefitted by his

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 13 February 1793

    Since my last, I have had every reason to believe, that the execution of the King has produced on foreign nations the effect which I had imagined.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 13 February 1793

    am to acknowledge yours of the seventh of last November, which I cannot do without expressing my concern at a resolution, which will deprive the United States of an able and faithful servant.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 14 February 1793

    You will find that events have blackened more and more in this country. The present prospects are dreadful.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    Paris, FRA - 16 February 1793

    It has so happened that a very great proportion of the French officers, who served in America, have been either opposed to the revolution at an early day, or felt themselves obliged at a later period to abandon it.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Pinckney.

    Paris, FRA - 27 February 1793

    On the contrary I have every reason to be convinced, that at all stipulations in the treaty between France and the United States of America will be scrupulously complied with.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Pinckney.

    Paris, FRA - 2 March 1793

    I am informed, in a way that precludes doubt, that the Executive Council here sent out by M. Genet three hundred blank commissions for privateers, to be given clandestinely to such persons as he might find in America inclined to take them.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to William Carmichael.

    Paris, FRA - 4 March 1793

    As far as I can judge, this nation approaches to the point where the vigor of laws must supply the place of enthusiastic zeal, for this latter begins to abate.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 6 March 1793

    He had opened a large loan, on his private credit and account, at Antwerp ; but the capitalists having no great confidence in him, it went on slowly ; and to stimulate their zeal, he threatened them with something very like military execution.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 7 March 1793

    I am convinced that few of my countrymen will be so lost to all moral sense, as to embark in a game so abominable, where the murder of their fellow creatures enters as a leading chance.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 8 March 1793

    Last evening I was informed that the French army in Flanders has been defeated, but as this is not an official account, I merely mention it as it is, viz. a letter sent express by an individual at Brussels

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 9 March 1793

    The accounts given to the Convention are so lame and blind, that one is obliged to piece them out like a tattered writing, where whole sentences are wanting.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Robert Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 12 March 1793

    I am told that the London Gazetteers have killed me, besides burning my house, and other little pleasantries of the same kind. Now as these accounts may be republished, I apprize you thereof, and pray you to vouch, that it was not true at the time of

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 13 March 1793

    In this case a battle must decide the fate of Flanders, and both parties will collect for the purpose all the force they can muster.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Lebrun.

    Paris, FRA - 24 March 1793

    Many complaints have reached me respecting the outrages committed against American vessels, by the French privateers.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Lebrun.

    Paris, FRA - 29 March 1793

    Yesterday afternoon I was arrested in the street, and conducted to the Section de la Butte des Moulins, because I had not a Carte de Citoyen.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Lebrun.

    Paris, FRA - 1 April 1793

    I send the enclosed formula of the certificates of registry, with which American vessels ought to be furnished. Our government grants these certificates only to those vessels, which belong exclusively to American citizens.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 4 April 1793

    You will perceive, that all my conjectures respecting the army of Dumouriez are more than realized. From the letters of Custine you will perceive that he has been totally defeated, for he found it necessary to fall back about forty miles

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 5 April 1793

    It appears that the army of Dumouriez is attached to him, and will go all the lengths which he desires. What is worse, to that the militia also adhere, so that he has all chances now in his favor

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 19 April 1793

    Since mine of the fifth, I learn that the militia have, in general, quitted the standard of Dumouriez, but he has about twelve thousand of the regular troops, and there is reason to believe that others mean to join him.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Lebrun.

    Paris, FRA - 14 May 1793

    I have just learned that the National Convention, in its session of the ninth, has authorised French ships of war and privateers to stop, and bring into the ports of the Republic, neutral vessels

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Sainport, FRA - 20 May 1793

    It is, however, clear that the greater part of those troops, which adhered to Dumouriez, have returned to their country and many to their standards.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Sainport, FRA - 12 June 1793

    in the best regulated governments it is difficult to prevent the violation of the rights of neutral powers, and much more so, where, in the tempest of a revolution, government resembles more a weathercock, marking from whence the hurricane comes, tha

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Lebrun.

    Sainport, FRA - 19 June 1793

    I have just received the copy of a declaration, made by the captain and crew of the American ship, the Little Cherub, which proves that this ship, having taken on board thirty French passengers, whom the Spanish government had sent away, conducted th

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 25 June 1793

    As to your re-acceptance, Sir, you know my sentiments, which, on that, as on some other subjects, are, I think, unchangeable. It will be time enough for you to have a successor, when it shall please God to call you from this world's theatre.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Sainport, FRA - 25 June 1793

    I do myself the honor to enclose herein the copy of what I wrote on the nineteenth instant to M. Lebrun, respecting an atrocious violation of our Flag

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Sainport, FRA - 27 June 1793

    the administration of the Colony of St Domingo had purchased several cargoes, sent to that island by American merchants, that it had seized others, and that in payment of the whole it had given drafts on the representative of the French nation at Phi

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Sainport, FRA - 28 June 1793

    I learn with satisfaction the daily arrival of wheat and flour, sent to you from America, but I feel some uneasiness respecting that which has not yet arrived.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Sainport, FRA - 4 July 1793

    The reparation enjoined by the representatives of the French nation is worthy of its justice, and consequently the United States will be perfectly satisfied with it.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Sainport, FRA - 6 August 1793

    I thank you for your attention to the affair of the brig Patty, and your services in that of the ship Laurens.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Sainport, FRA - 7 August 1793

    Enclosed herewith you will find my account up to the first of last month. I did not send it sooner, because I wished to comprise therein those of the Consulates, none of which are come forward.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Sainport, FRA - 13 August 1793

    You will perceive, Sir, in this correspondence one of the many violations of our flag in the case of the Little Cherub, which, being attended with circumstances of peculiar atrocity, called for more pointed animadversion.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Sainport, FRA - 20 August 1793

    I do not pretend, Sir, to interfere in the internal concerns of the French Republic, and I am persuaded that the Convention has had weighty reasons for laying upon commerce the restrictions of which the American captains complain.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Sainport, FRA - 22 September 1793

    I suppose Mr Pinckney has his hands full of similar business, for I learn, now and then, that the British privateers make as free with our vessels as the French have done.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Sainport, FRA - 1 October 1793

    I have the honor to send you herewith, the copies of two judgments, rendered with regard to the American vessel, the George.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Paris, FRA - 8 October 1793

    Unhappily, they will show you, that the agent, whom you employed to maintain harmony between our two Republics, has been at least indiscreet

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 10 October 1793

    I arrived in this city the afternoon of the fifth. I had an interview with the Minister of Foreign Affairs on the morning of the eighth.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 10 October 1793

    I am very anxious that Consuls and Vice Consuls should be appointed in all the ports. My countrymen are incessantly applying to me from every quarter about property taken from them.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Paris, FRA - 12 October 1793

    I request you at the same time, Sir, to permit me to make two general observations on the whole of this business; one of which applies to the organization, and the other to the proceedings of the commercial tribunals.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    Paris, FRA - 17 October 1793

    Mr Livingston delivered to me yours of the 25th of July. He says that you alone gave him an idea of this country like the reality.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 18 October 1793

    The present government is evidently a despotism both in principle and practice. The Convention now consists of only a part of those, who were chosen to frame a constitution.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 19 October 1793

    It may be an important judicial question, how far the Minister is protected by the law of nations, after the arrival of his successor.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Paris, FRA - 19 October 1793

    But although I cannot be of your opinion, I do not intend farther to discuss the considerations, which have produced the decision of the French government.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 19 October 1793

    In a subsequent conversation he assured me, that Genet should be punished. I replied that the United States had only ordered me to ask his recall, and I could go no farther.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 20 October 1793

    Be that as it may, the French have experienced a complete defeat in Alsace. The lines of the Lauter have been forced, and they have lost everything.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 12 November 1793

    I understand that a kind of etiquette has been established, by which the Consuls, as not being properly diplomatic characters, are not received or invited with the Minister

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Sainport, FRA - 16 November 1793

    In my last, I had the honor to inform you, that the rate of depreciation had continued nearly about what it was on the twelfth of September, viz. two and a half to three for one.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 26 November 1793

    You will form some more accurate idea of this situation, when I tell you that a young American by the name of Griffith, having lost at Havre my certificate that he was an American citizen, was taken up.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Paris, FRA - 9 December 1793

    I receive, every day, letters which present to me the sad picture of what the commerce of the United States suffers at Bordeaux. Our vessels came on the faith of treaties.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 12 December 1793

    The insurgents of Vendee, who had broken into Lower Normandy, seem to have divided themselves into various bands, and to have been attended with a varied success

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Paris, FRA - 29 December 1793

    A letter, which I have just received from the citizen Griffith, informs me that he has been two months in prison, with out any charge whatever being exhibited against him.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Paris, FRA - 21 January 1794

    The young man, Mr Griffith, whom I mentioned in mine of the twenty-sixth of November, is at length out of prison ; but another, of the name of Hoskins, still remains in confinement

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Paris, FRA - 5 February 1794

    In a newspaper of this day I find the translation of your message of the fifth of December to Congress, and observe, that after stating the violation of the treaty by a decree of the National Convention, you tell them I have been instructed to make r

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Paris, FRA - 14 February 1794

    Thomas Paine has just made application to me, to claim him as a citizen of the United States. The following, I believe, are the facts with regard to him.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to James Leray.

    Paris, FRA - 22 February 1794

    And, first, you are to know that my appointment of you is a mere assumption of power on my part, no such authority being given to me as that which is implied in your commission.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Francois Deforgues.

    Paris, FRA - 27 February 1794

    The Captains of American vessels brought into your ports, and persons interested in the said vessels and their cargoes, address to me very serious complaints, which seem but too well founded.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Sainport, FRA - 6 March 1794

    Hoskins, whose imprisonment I mentioned in my last, has been liberated.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Sainport, FRA - 7 March 1794

    Shortly after the intelligence of hostilities by the Algerines, I applied to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, as being interested in putting a stop thereto, in order to cover the arrival of provisions in our ships.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Sainport, FRA - 13 March 1794

    The gazettes tell us that Mr Jefferson is coming to Europe ; some of them say as my successor ; others say it is a secret mission.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Sainport, FRA - 10 April 1794

    On the eighteenth of October, I gave you a short view of the nature of the then government, and added what seemed to be the probable termination.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Edmund Randolph.

    Sainport, FRA - 15 April 1794

    Permit me, my dear Sir, to congratulate you on your appointment. It is honorable to you, and will, I believe, be useful to the United States.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Edmund Randolph.

    Sainport, FRA - 18 April 1794

    You will, perhaps, ask why my letters to the Minister are in French, rather than in my own language. It is not to save time or trouble to myself, as you will easily suppose , but there are two strong reasons for it.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Edmund Randolph.

    Paris, FRA - 6 May 1794

    I am told that the Republic now feed ten hundred and thirty thousand infantry, and ninety-four thousand cavalry. This is an immense army even on paper

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Edmund Randolph.

    Sainport, FRA - 31 May 1794

    We have had a sort of novel, or farce, lately, the subject of which was, that certain Commissioners had arrived from the United States at Brest.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Edmund Randolph.

    Sainport, FRA - 31 May 1794

    While I had the honor to sit in Congress during the war, it was my lot to oppose what then appeared to me a rage for treaties

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Buchot.

    Sainport, FRA - 21 June 1794

    During the last war, France furnished several sums of money to the United States of America, both under the head of loans and that of gratuities. The first of these advances was a million of livres

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Buchot.

    Sainport, FRA - 11 July 1794

    I think it my duty to observe to you, with regard to this subject, that considerable sums have already been paid by the United States for various objects, arms, ammunition, and habiliments

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Edmund Randolph.

    Sainport, FRA - 22 July 1794

    The bankers of the United States in Amsterdam wrote to me on the twentieth of June, that they have reason to apprehend, that it will be extremely difficult for them to supply me in future for the amount of my salary and expenses attending my mission.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Edmund Randolph.

    Sainport, FRA - 23 July 1794

    I will mention my perfect satisfaction in perusing Mr Jefferson's statement of our dispute with Great Britain, which is, in my opinion, a masterly performance. I hope his abilities will not be lost to the public.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Robert Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 14 August 1794

    I am preparing for my departure ; but as yet can take no step, because there is a kind of interregnum in the government

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Edmund Randolph.

    Paris, FRA - 18 August 1794

    My only remaining wish respecting this affair is, that my successor may fully succeed, and realize the expectations of the United States, or even surpass them.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Edmund Randolph.

    Paris, FRA - 31 August 1794

    The history you give of my recall is perfectly satisfactory, so far as I am personally concerned. I have never doubted an instant, that I should be treated with candor and honor

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Edmund Randolph.

    Paris, FRA - 18 September 1794

    The resources of this country will hold out till the end of April next, but then things will appear in a situation truly deplorable.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to George Washington.

    Hamburg, DEU - 30 December 1794

    although I am persuaded that you will believe me, on my word, I will nevertheless assign some reasons why a change of situation was desirable.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Adrienne Lafayette.

    Vienna, AUT - 19 December 1796

    It is certainly unnecessary for me, Madam, to express here the interest, which I take in your fate, and in that of your unfortunate friend, and to tell you how happy I should be, could I procure for him his liberty.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Johann Thugut.

    Vienna, AUT - 31 December 1796

    It would, however, be a most praiseworthy action on your part to suppress the letter, and to send me, in place of any answer to it, an order for the release of the unfortunate individual in question.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 3 May 1812

    If Madison be rechosen, We, if by that you mean the United States, shall not I believe make Peace with England. If Clinton be chosen We shall.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to John Jay.

    unknown - 25 February 1813

    Last Tuesday evening my wife was delivered of a boy. I communicate that event because I believe it will give you pleasure.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 27 December 1813

    It is possible, therefore, that Mr. Madison may blow up civil broil into civil war. But the result must be ruin to his tools here, and awful vengeance on his supporters elsewhere.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 17 January 1814

    I believe the President to be mistaken in his notion that Bonaparte will be pestered by Insurrections. Neither Frenchmen nor any other men are prone to rise against so severe and so crafty a Chief as Napoleon.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 27 January 1814

    Were Federalists in Power, this Country would resemble that, but as Matters now stand, the Case is reversed. If a Charge of Inconsistency, much less of Duplicity, can be established it will injure, if not ruin, our opposition

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 31 January 1814

    Your Sentiments of our Rulers are just. I ask a serious Question, what Chance is there of better Rulers if the Union be preserved?

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 23 March 1814

    Am I awake or do I dream? Is this the People that resisted a mere Claim of arbitrary Power? It seems to me I was once a Member of Congress during a revolutionary War

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 18 October 1814

    What are you to gain by giving Mr. Madison Men and Money? Has he not told you distinctly that he will not defend you?

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 1 November 1814

    As to Mr. Monroe's 60,000 conscriptive men in Kendal Green, his 40,000 in Buckram, they are worthy of Mr. Dallas' Bank Stock. Your Enemy will not be deceived by such a Paper Machinery of Force and Finance

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 7 January 1815

    I learnt yesterday that your Bank Bubble has burst

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 2 February 1815

    It may be expected therefore that you and those who think and feel like you, will go on, piling up one oppressive tax on the top of another to support the Measures of Mr. Madison.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 16 February 1815

    As matters now stand, whatever has been done is done and the Consequences will follow in their own Course without Impediment or Deviation from what we may do or attempt.

  • Gouverneur Morris letter to Rufus King.

    Morrisania, NY - 15 March 1816

    I have received yours of the ninth, and am pleased to learn that you stand a Candidate for the Government.