Letters written to Gouverneur Morris during the years 1778 thru 1816

Gouverneur Morris

56 Letters written to Gouverneur Morris from 9 author(s) including Rufus King , and George Washington from places such as , NY, Albany, NY and Passy, FRA. Who did Gouverneur Morris know?

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  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    , NY - 11 March 1778

    Pennsylvania, I believe, is sick unto death. It will nevertheless recover, though perhaps not soon. Weak and bad constitutions incline to chronical disorders.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Albany, NY - 29 April 1778

    I am now engaged in the most disagreeable part of my duty, trying criminals. They multiply exceedingly. Robberies become frequent : the woods afford them shelter, and the tories food.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Passy, FRA - 17 July 1783

    Our friend Morris, I suspect, is not a favourite of this court. They say, he treats them as his cashier. They refuse absolutely to supply more money.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Passy, FRA - 24 September 1783

    I have, as yet, met with neither men nor things on this side of the water which abate my predilection, or, if you please, my prejudices in favour of those on the other.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Madrid, ESP - 10 February 1784

    You suppose that ill health induces me to resign. You are mistaken. It seldom happens that any measure is prompted by one single motive, though one among others may sometimes have decisive weight and influence.

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    New York, NY - 13 October 1789

    It being important to both countries, that the treaty of peace between Great Britain and the United States should be observed and performed with perfect and mutual good faith, and that a treaty of commerce should be concluded by them

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    New York, NY - 13 October 1789

    My letter to you, herewith enclosed, will give you the credence necessary to enable you to do the business, which it commits to your management, and which I am persuaded you will readily undertake.

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    New York, NY - 13 October 1789

    To thank you for the interesting communications contained in those letters, and for the pains you have taken to procure me a watch, is all, or nearly all, I shall attempt in this letter

  • Francis Osborne letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Whitehall, ENG - 28 April 1790

    We cannot but lament every circumstance, which can have delayed the accomplishment of those engagements, (comprised in the treaty) to which those States were in the most solemn manner bound

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    New York, NY - 7 July 1790

    and, as far as your communications with the British Government had gone, to assure you of my entire approbation of your conduct respecting the former.

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    New York, NY - 12 August 1790

    On their own proposal, formerly, to exchange a minister, we sent them one. They have taken no notice of that, and talk of agreeing to exchange one now, as if the idea were new.

  • Francis Osborne letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Whitehall, ENG - 10 September 1790

    I well remember the nature of the conversation you allude to, as well as the particular points upon which the two countries mutually complain of a non-observance of treaty.

  • William Short letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 12 September 1790

    I see often some of them, who say you not only predicted what was to happen, but how ; they wish to consult you now, that you might tell them when the bankruptcy will arrive

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 28 July 1791

    The change of systems, which have so long prevailed in Europe, will, undoubtedly, affect us in a degree proportioned to our political or commercial connexions with the several nations of it.

  • Lebrun letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 4 August 1792

    I have the honor to inform you, that the King has made choice of M. Bonne-Carrere, director general of the Departe-ment Politique to succeed M. Ternant as minister plenipotentiary from France to the United States.

  • Lebrun letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 30 August 1792

    Upon the principle, that your instructions do not authorise you to treat with the new French government, your functions would be, at this moment, void

  • Lebrun letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 16 September 1792

    I see that you have misunderstood certain expressions therein contained, and which were used relatively to circumstances.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Madrid, ESP - 13 October 1792

    I have received your festina Jente letter, but wish it had been at least partly in cipher ; you need not be informed of my reasons for the wish, as by this time you must know that seals are, on this side of the water, rather matters of decoration

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 October 1792

    gloomy indeed appears the situation of France at this juncture. But it is hardly probable that even you, who are on the spot, can say with any precision how these things will terminate

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 January 1793

    It has long since been observed, that, of the three millions of livres given by the court of France to aid us in the commencement of our revolution, one million was unaccounted for by the hands into which it was paid.

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 March 1793

    And unwise should we be in the extreme, to involve ourselves in the contests of European nations, where our weight could be but small, though the loss to ourselves would be certain.

  • Lebrun letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 29 March 1793

    I sent a copy of them immediately to the Minister of the Marine, praying him to take the most prompt measures to procure for Captain Todd the satisfaction due to him

  • Lebrun letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 3 April 1793

    The domiciliary visits were an equally general measure, from which no house in Paris was exempt. I see with pleasure, that the Commissaries of the Section, who entered your house, withdrew after the explanation you gave them.

  • Lebrun letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 21 June 1793

    Infinitely pained at the afflicting details contained in that letter, I thought it my duty to communicate it immediately to the Comite de Salut Public, a copy of whose report I send herewith.

  • Francois Deforgues letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 27 June 1793

    My predecessor has sent me a letter, which you wrote to him on the nineteenth instant, demanding reparation for an outrage committed on board the American ship, Little Cherub.

  • Francois Deforgues letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 3 July 1793

    It is unfortunate, that the administration of St Domingo did not make arrangement with the French Minister in Philadelphia, to provide the means for paying their drafts.

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 August 1793

    will sufficiently inform you of the transactions which have taken place between M. Genet, the Minister of France, and the government here, and of the painful necessity they have brought on, of desiring his recall.

  • Francois Deforgues letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 10 October 1793

    The President of the United States has done justice to our sentiments, in attributing the deviations of the citizen Genet to causes entirely foreign from his instructions

  • Francois Deforgues letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Paris, FRA - 14 October 1793

    You have complained of the fraud committed by the captors of the ship Peggy, in taking away the papers, which proved her cargo to be American.

  • Thomas Jefferson letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 January 1794

    I have the honor to inform you, that I have resigned the office of Secretary of State, and that Mr Randolph, late Attorney General of the United States, is appointed by the President

  • Edmund Randolph letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 January 1794

    I do myself the honor of enclosing to you a letter from Mr Jefferson, announcing my succession to him, as Secretary of State.

  • Edmund Randolph letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 April 1794

    description

  • Edmund Randolph letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 June 1794

    The letter, now enclosed for taking leave, is sent solely for the sake of form and your own accommodation ; and it may be delivered or not, as you think proper.

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Baltimore, MD - 19 June 1794

    The difficulty, under existing circumstances, of knowing what to write to you, had determined me to write nothing

  • George Washington letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Mount Vernon, VA - 25 June 1794

    The sole object of the enclosed letter was to evince to you, that, notwithstanding your recall, you held the same place in my estimation that you did before it happened.

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    unknown - 30 March 1807

    I recd. your Paper concerning the Impressment of our seamen but have delayed its publication in expectation of becoming acquainted with the Contents of the Treaty.

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Jamaica, NY - 13 July 1807

    If the weather should be good, I think of making you a visit on Thursday

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Jamaica, NY - 31 July 1807

    I shall attend the Meeting of the Trustees of Columbia College advertised for Monday next, and invite you to meet me in town

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Bedford, NY - 13 September 1807

    You have the gout, and you extract consolation from it ; this is good moral chymistry. My rheumatism and your gout may perhaps carry us home the farthest way round, but not in an easy chair.

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    New York, NY - 21 March 1810

    You probably are apprized that the Conveyance by Trinity Church of the ground on which the College stands contains a condition, that conformably to a provision of the Charter, requires that the President be an Episcopalian

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    unknown - 28 October 1812

    I send you for yr. amusement the morning Chronicle for August.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Bedford, NY - 22 February 1813

    You request me to be one of the godfathers. Baptism is too generally regarded as being little more than a customary ceremony ; and yet the purpose of it, and the names used on the occasion, show it to be a solemn procedure.

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, MD - 19 December 1813

    With sixty thousand men all Canada may be conquered, says Genl. Armstrong (who would be named Lieutenant Genl., if he could), in a single campaign

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, MD - 9 January 1814

    To Admiral Warren's proposal of an armistice in 1812, Mr. Monroe replied, that notwithstanding the Repeal of the orders in Council, the subject of impressment remained unadjusted

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, MD - 26 January 1814

    I send you enclosed an extract of a letter that I received by my son Charles from Sir William Scott.

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, MD - 10 April 1814

    But so long as the Enemy keeps up the Blockade, altho' English Goods may come in, the Produce of the Country not being suffered to go out, the Payment for Eng. Goods must be made in Specie

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, MD - 0 October 1814

    Crawford writes from Paris that Eng. influence pervades all the States of Europe; that none are disposed to listen to our Representatives agt. England

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, MD - 13 October 1814

    Even Mr. Madison lately complained that the Ears of every Court in Europe were closed against us ; such, as he says, have been the intrigues and misrepresentations of England

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, MD - 14 October 1814

    Early in this month, the Federalists of the two Houses of Congress met at Crawford's to consider of the course which they ought to pursue during the Session.

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, MD - 19 October 1814

    Genl. Lewis is removed from his command ; and that Govr. Tompkins has been requested to repair immediately to the City to command the Forces.

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, MD - 21 October 1814

    Monroe proposes to fill the regular army to 62 thousand, by conscription

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, MD - 12 February 1815

    The People must feel the inconvenience, & suffer the punishment, of their own folly, before they will consent to renounce it.

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, MD - 15 February 1815

    We have received the Treaty of Peace: it will be considered by the Senate tomorrow.

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    unknown - 9 March 1816

    You may have heard that I have been nominated at Albany a Candidate for the off. of Govr. This was quite a surprize

  • Rufus King letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Washington, VA - 9 March 1816

    We have here some symptoms of the declining influence of Mr. M. ; as he draws towards his close, his authority diminishes ; expectations are directed beyond his term.

  • John Jay letter to Gouverneur Morris.

    Bedford, NY - 0 October 1816

    Having heard much of your discourse before the New-York Historical Society, it gave me pleasure to receieve copy of it, and to find from the direction that I owed it to your friendly attention.