Letters written to Ezekiel Webster during the years 1800 thru 1829

Ezekiel Webster

68 Letters written to Ezekiel Webster from 2 author(s) including Daniel Webster from places such as Hanover, NH, Salisbury, NH and Worcester, MA. Who did Ezekiel Webster know?

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  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Hanover, NH - 25 April 1800

    Therefore, since we are wretchedly poor, you will be good enough to take the will for the deed, and believe that I would do as much to entertain and instruct you as any man living.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Salisbury, NH - 4 November 1802

    Now, Zeke, you will not read half a sentence, no, not one syllable, before you have thoroughly searched this sheet for scrip ; but, my word for it, you will find no scrip here.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Salisbury, NH - 5 May 1804

    Salisbury, you perceive, as yet heads my letters ; and how much longer it may, I can hardly tell. I know it is much better for me to be absent, and I am zealously laboring to put myself into a new situation.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Salisbury, NH - 10 June 1804

    Yesterday evening I returned from election, in about as good spirits as you would naturally suppose, after being witness to the triumph of democracy. J. T. Oilman is elected Governor by a majority of one hundred and thirty-two votes

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Salisbury, NH - 18 June 1804

    Day after to-morrow, if the wind blows from the right point, I start for East Andover ; on this tour I expect to be absent about twelve days ; and soon after my return here, I expect to be in Boston.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Worcester, MA - 5 November 1804

    The object of this is to request you to go to him and beg him not to say to anybody in or about Salisbury, that I am gone on this journey.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Springfield, MA - 9 November 1804

    Riding from Boston here, is just like riding through New Hampshire and Vermont. The same prospects, the same people, the same modes and manners of life.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boscawen, NH - 25 April 1805

    I had learned the loss of my money from Mr. Fifield's own mouth, whom I happened to see in Newburyport, before the reception of yours. I am far from feeling any uneasy sensations on that account.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boscawen, NH - 30 April 1805

    As yet I find it not in my power to procure any money for the purpose of paying for my books. I therefore am under the necessity of requesting you to make my peace with Mr. Parker.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boscawen, NH - 16 May 1805

    I was at Salisbury yesterday. The family are well as usual. Father is desirous you should write to him and you must do so forthwith.

  • Sally Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boscawen, NH - 25 May 1805

    Are you so much confined in your school, that you have not time to write, or can it be that you are so much delighted with the people of Boston, as to forget your friends in the country ?

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    unknown - 0 June 1805

    I got home alive last evening, although most killed by hot weather ; have not seen our folks, but hear they are well.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boscawen, NH - 28 July 1805

    In the history of myself, I believe my last chapter left me just arrived from Boston. Shortly after, the 4th of July appeared, and I made my bow and my speech to the Salisburians.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boscawen, NH - 9 August 1805

    Mr. Fletcher having failed and shut up, it seems probable that something will now be done about the clerkship.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boscawen, NH - 15 November 1805

    I should be inexpressibly gratified if you would accompany Nat. into this quarter.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Portsmouth, NH - 3 March 1808

    Money I have none ; I shall certainly be hanged before three weeks, if I cannot get some. What can be done ?

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Portsmouth, NH - 9 March 1808

    Tell Nat. that I do not thank him for his love. It is like the priest's blessing ; if it were worth any thing he would not bestow it.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Portsmouth, NH - 2 March 1810

    Mr. K. writes that there is reason to fear that Boscawen will not be quite so Federal as last year. This will never do.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    unknown - 0 February 1811

    I send you the jalap, the gum opium, and some lemons, instead of oranges, of which there are none in town. If I can find any balsam-tolu, I will send it; as yet, have found none.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 28 June 1813

    We shall probably get up some resolutions, directly attacking the war. If so, I suppose I shall shoot my little gun. We have some fine fellows on our side of the House.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 4 July 1813

    We are yet on the taxes ; they will probably pass. It will take so long to adjust the details, and to bring the bills before the House to be discussed on their general principles

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 29 December 1813

    I arrived here last evening, and here learned of the Portsmouth fire and the consumption of my house.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 30 January 1814

    What do you do with such a house full of women and children ? Especially, how do you make out to keep the house quiet, with those two black-eyed, brown-headed, chattering, romping cousins in it

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 5 February 1814

    On the Maryland Memorial, a very animated debate happened in both Houses. Mr. King came out for the first time. You never heard such a speaker. In strength, and dignity, and fire

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 7 March 1814

    The spring is coming forward here. The ground is settled and dry ; the birds are appearing, and the grass is green. But spring does not rush forward here, as it does in New Hampshire after it has commenced.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 28 March 1814

    In relation to the offer made by England to renew Jay's treaty, I intend to see and collect, and carry home, what evidence there is on the point.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 29 May 1814

    There is no present prospect, as I think, of peace, although the Madison men appear to be very confident of such a result from the Russian embassy.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 30 October 1814

    We have as yet done little. The taxes are before us. I have marked out my course respecting them, and shall vote for nothing but the whiskey tax. This I am anxious to have laid.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 8 November 1814

    We are now taking up the conscription ; we shall, I think, let Mr. Troup fill up the blanks, &c. before we state our objections to it. I doubt whether it will pass ; but what else can government do ? Voluntary enlistments will not answer.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 21 November 1814

    At present we are engaged about a bank. The project brought in by the new secretary of the treasury was calculated only for the benefit of the holders of the stock, created since the war.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 22 December 1814

    We have done nothing here lately, except with reference to taxes. They have all passed this House, except the land tax of six millions, last year three, which will be read the third time to-day.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 9 January 1815

    The bank bill has passed our House in a form very much amended ; it will now be harmless, as we think. We had a hard task to prevent its passing in its worst shape.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 22 January 1815

    We had yesterday a letter from Secretary Dallas, giving a bad account of the treasury ; five millions more of new taxes must be collected within this year, in order to get money enough out of all our ways and means to pay the interest of the debt

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 30 January 1815

    The President has negatived the bank bill. So all our labor is lost. I hope this will satisfy our friends, that it was not a bank likely to favor the administration.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 26 March 1816

    I have settled my purpose to remove from New Hampshire in the course of the summer. I have thought of Boston, New York, and Albany.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 11 April 1816

    I learned with great sorrow the illness of our mother and Mary. I have hardly a hope that the former can now be living.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boston, MA - 0 January 1817

    Our dear little daughter has followed yours. She died on Thursday evening at eleven o'clock, and was interred yesterday.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boston, MA - 19 January 1817

    Grace's illness has brought me home. We arrived four days ago. She has been declining almost ever since we left her, the middle of November

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 2 February 1819

    All is safe. Judgment was rendered this morning, reversing the judgment in New Hampshire.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boston, MA - 17 August 1820

    As to a president, I have weighed the subject very much in my own mind, and conversed on it on every occasion with the friends of the college. My mind is not made up in favor of any candidate.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boston, MA -

    Mr. Mason has not been here, but is expected on Tuesday. I had a good deal of conversation with him in the summer, on the subject of the college, and I have no doubt he agrees with the rest of us

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boston, MA - 17 June 1821

    Mr. Olcott wrote me on this same subject of the overseers. I am very doubtful whether any good would come of the project.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boston, MA - 4 October 1821

    I like your project of a course of proceeding for the trustees very much. I have no doubt something like that would be very judicious.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 25 March 1823

    It is our expectation to go to Dorchester for the summer, and I intend to move the second day of May. Soon after that I hope you will come down, as I shall want to see you very much on more accounts than one.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Princeton, NJ - 20 November 1823

    It seems to be generally believed that Mr. Crawford's friends have no longer any reasonable hope of success in that State. This point being agreed, every thing else is controverted.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 4 December 1823

    It is time to put an end to caucuses. They make great men little, and little men great. The true source of power is the people.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boston, MA -

    By the way, Governor Morrill has been in town, and I have heard of his saying that he should favor the election of General Miller and yourself.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 27 January 1824

    The Presidential question is still in the clouds. We know no more here than you do, and such as you and I have nothing to do but keep quiet.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 22 February 1824

    The caucus has hurt nobody but its friends, as far as I can now judge. Mr. Adams's chance seems to increase, and he and General Jackson are likely to be the real competitors at last.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 14 March 1824

    I fully agree with you that it is unfortunate that Judge Smith should be set up for Governor, but, as it is all over by this time, it is in vain to repine.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 18 April 1824

    Mr. Clay's speech is printed ; mine is in press, and both shall be sent to you in pamphlet.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 29 December 1824

    I hope to sustain myself with the consciousness, that my blessings are still much more numerous than my afflictions.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 13 January 1825

    A main inquiry is, in what direction Mr. Clay and his friends will move. There would seem at present to be some reason to think they will take a part finally for Mr. Adams.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    unknown - 15 January 1825

    I HAVE written to the boys, that I will help them a little, if you are satisfied it would do them good.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    unknown - 4 February 1825

    Mr. Clay's ill-judged card has produced an avowal, or sort of avowal, which makes the whole thing look ridiculous.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 16 February 1825

    You are acquainted with all the particulars of the election. The appointments are now under consideration. Mr. Clay will be Secretary of State

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 15 March 1825

    I still believe that this is but the last gasp of selfishness and party, and that better days are coming.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 29 January 1826

    I think I have never known a session, in which there seemed more reluctance to go early to work. Indeed, there is not a great deal that is absolutely necessary to be done.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boston, MA - 20 July 1827

    You cannot disapprove and dislike the party proceeding at Concord, more than I do. I hold it equally unjust and impolitic.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 17 December 1827

    I arrived here but last night, and have first to say that I left my wife sick at New York.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    New York, NY - 8 January 1828

    I cannot say any thing new in regard to Mrs. Webster. Her case is most serious. It is one of rare occurrence ; no physician here, but Dr. Perkins, thinking he ever saw one like it.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    New York, NY - 17 January 1828

    I cannot give you any favorable news respecting my wife. She is no better, and I fear is daily growing weaker.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 20 March 1828

    I want you to tell me what you think best for the administration, and for me in relation to a subject upon which the newspapers continue to be loquacious.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 23 March 1828

    I cannot listen for a moment to what you say about not being a candidate. I never shall consent to your declining, if you have a fair opportunity.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 4 April 1828

    I have had a good deal of conversation here about the Hampshire matters, with certain friends. I think a good disposition prevails

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Boston, MA - 19 June 1828

    I hardly know what to say, in reply to yours, about going to Boscawen. I had firmly resolved to go up last Saturday with Mr. Paige, Julia, and Edward, but was persuaded to give it up, and to stay and argue a cause here

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 17 January 1829

    You did right to go on the ticket. I showed Mr. Bell your letter. He says your fears, that republicans will strike off your name, are groundless, and that you will get as many votes as any of the rest.

  • Daniel Webster letter to Ezekiel Webster.

    Washington, MD - 15 March 1829

    The Senate will probably adjourn to-morrow, and I hope the court will rise, or at least will dismiss me by Wednesday or Thursday. I shall be immediately off.