Benjamin Franklin Letters for the years 1767 thru 1783

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin wrote 181 Letters from a total of 5 locations including London, ENG, Paris, FRA, and Edinburgh, SCT. Benjamin Franklin wrote a total of 73 people including William Franklin, and Deborah Franklin. Most of Benjamin Franklin's letters were written in the year 1772. Several other letters were written in 1768 and 1771. Who did Benjamin Franklin know? View Benjamin Franklin's social graph.

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  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Ross.

    London, ENG - 11 April 1767

    Here public affairs are in great disorder; a strong opposition against the ministry, which, at the same time, is thought not to be well united; and daily apprehensions of new changes make it extremely difficult to get forward with business.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Henry Home.

    London, ENG - 11 April 1767

    In the same session with the stamp act, an act was passed to regulate the quartering of soldiers in America

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Cadwallader Evans.

    London, ENG - 5 May 1767

    I thank you for your remarks on the gout. They may be useful to me, who have already had some touches of that distemper.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Galloway.

    London, ENG - 13 June 1767

    In my last of May 2Oth, I mentioned my hopes that we should at length get over all obstructions to the repeal of the act restraining the legal tender of paper money; but those hopes are now greatly lessened.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Mary Stevenson.

    London, ENG - 17 June 1767

    A Muse, you must know, visited me this Morning! I see you are surpriz'd, as I was. I never saw one before. And shall never see another.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 22 June 1767

    It seems now as if I should stay here another Winter, and therefore I must leave it to your Judgment to act in the Affair of your Daughter's Match, as shall seem best.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Peter Collinson.

    London, ENG - 13 July 1767

    I have heard of an account you lately received from Russia of some discovery of an ancient sepulchre in the frontiers of that country.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Franklin.

    London, ENG - 17 July 1767

    I find here but two of our relations remaining, that bear the name of Franklin, viz. Thomas Franklin of Lutterworth in Leicestershire, a dyer, and his daughter Sally Franklin

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Richard Price.

    London, ENG - 1 August 1767

    Last night I received a letter from D r Robertson, acquainting me that the University of Edinburgh have on my recommendation conferred the degree of D r in Divinity upon the Rev d M r Cooper of Boston

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to George Croghan.

    London, ENG - 5 August 1767

    I return you many thanks for the box of elephants' tusks and grinders. They are extremely curious on many accounts

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 5 August 1767

    I have now before me all your late Letters, and shall answer them Article by Article.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Galloway.

    London, ENG - 8 August 1767

    The confusion among our great men still continues as much as ever, and a melancholy thing it is to consider, that, instead of employing the present leisure of peace in such measures as might extend our commerce

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Canton.

    London, ENG - 25 August 1767

    When I was at Paris about 10 Days since, I was told that a Comet was then visible with a Tail of considerable Length.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 28 August 1767

    Last week I dined at Lord Shelburne's, and had a long conversation with him and Mr. Conway (there being no other company) on the subject of reducing American expense.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Mary Stevenson.

    Paris, FRA - 14 September 1767

    Soon after I left you in that agreable Society at Bromley, I took the Resolution of making a Trip with Sir John Pringle into France.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 25 November 1767

    I wish the Boston people had been as quiet, since Governor Bernard has sent over all their violent papers to the ministry, and wrote them word that he daily expected a rebellion.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Canton.

    London, ENG - 27 November 1767

    After the Society was gone, my Lord Moreton said (when I offered him the Paper) that it ought to have been deliver'd before and read to the Society: he however desir'd me to produce it to the Council.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Galloway.

    London, ENG - 1 December 1767

    I am inclined to think with you that the small sum you have issued to discharge the public debts only will not be materially affected in its credit for want of the legal tender, considering especially the present extreme want of money in the province

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Ross.

    London, ENG - 13 December 1767

    The instruction you mention, as proposed by a certain great man, was really a wild one. The reasons you made use of against it were clear and strong, and could not but prevail.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 19 December 1767

    The resolutions of the Boston people concerning trade make a great noise here. Parliament has not yet taken notice of them, but the newspapers are in full cry against America.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 9 January 1768

    We have had so many alarms of changes, which did not take place, that just when I wrote it was thought the ministry would stand their ground.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Galloway.

    London, ENG - 9 January 1768

    I wrote to you via Boston, and have little to add, except to acquaint you that some changes have taken place since my last, which have not the most promising aspect for America

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Francois Dalibard.

    London, ENG - 31 January 1768

    I sent you some time since, Priestly's History of Electricity, under the Care of Mr. Molini, Bookseller on the Quay des Augustins. I hope it got safe to Paris, and that you have receiv'd it.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to P Berthier.

    London, ENG - 31 January 1768

    With cordial Thanks for your many Civilities to me when in Paris, I take this Opportunity of acquainting you, that your Certificate has been received by the Royal Society

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 13 February 1768

    I have received also the Indian and buckwheat meal, that they brought from you, with the apples, cranberries, and nuts, for all which I thank you. They all prove good

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Galloway.

    London, ENG - 17 February 1768

    In mine of January 9, I wrote to you that I believed, notwithstanding the clamour against America had been greatly increased by the Boston proceedings, we should attempt this session to obtain the repeal of the restraining act relating to paper money

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Wharton.

    London, ENG - 20 February 1768

    The story you mention of secretary Conway's wondering what I could be doing in England, and that he had not seen me for a considerable time, savours strongly of the channel through which it came, and deserves no notice.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Livezey.

    London, ENG - 20 February 1768

    your kind letter of Nov. 18, with a very welcome present of another Dozen of your wine. The former has been found excellent by many good judges, my Wine Merchant in particular was very desirous of knowing what quantity of it might be had

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Cadwallader Evans.

    London, ENG - 20 February 1768

    In yours of November 20th, you mention the lead in the worms of stills as a probable cause of the dry belly-ache among punch-drinkers in our West Indies.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Henry Home.

    London, ENG - 28 February 1768

    I have long been of an opinion similar to that you express, and think happiness consists more in small conveniences or pleasures that occur every day, than in great pieces of good fortune that happen but seldom to a man in the course of his life.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Galloway.

    London, ENG - 13 March 1768

    The old Parliament is gone, and its enemies now find themselves at liberty to abuse it. I inclose you a pamphlet, published the very hour of its prorogation.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG - 13 March 1768

    On receipt of your letter of January 20, Mr. Jackson and myself waited on Lord Hillsborough, the new secretary of state for American affairs, and communicated to him the contents

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 13 March 1768

    The purpose of settling the new colonies seems at present to be dropped, the change of American administration not appearing favourable to it. There seems rather to be an inclination to abandon the posts in the back country as more expensive than use

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 16 April 1768

    nothing has been talked or thought of here but elections. There have been amazing contests all over the kingdom, twenty or thirty thousand pounds of a side spent in several places, and inconceivable mischief done

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG - 16 April 1768

    I have just received your favour of February 20, directed to Mr. Jackson and myself, containing instructions for our conduct relating to the application for a repeal of the duty act, to the change of government, and to the legal tender of paper money

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Pringle.

    London, ENG - 10 May 1768

    You may remember, that when we were travelling together in Holland you remarked, that the trackschuyt in one of the stages went slower than usual, and inquired of the boatman, what might be the reason

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Galloway.

    London, ENG - 14 May 1768

    While I am writing, a great mob of coal porters fills the street, carrying a wretch of their business upon poles to be ducked, and otherwise punished at their pleasure for working at the old wages.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Ross.

    London, ENG - 14 May 1768

    I received your favour of March 13th, and am extremely concerned at the disorders on our frontiers, and at the debility or wicked connivance of our government and magistrates,

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 2 July 1768

    Instead of my being appointed to a new office, there has been a motion made to deprive me of that I now hold, and, I believe, for the same reason, though that was not the reason given out, viz. my being too much of an American

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Winthrop.

    London, ENG - 2 July 1768

    You must needs think the time long that your instruments have been in hand. Sundry circumstances have occasioned the delay.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Galloway.

    London, ENG - 2 July 1768

    My Lord Clare took me home from court to dine with him but two days before, saying he should be without other company, and wanted to talk with me on sundry American businesses.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to C Dumas.

    London, ENG - 25 July 1768

    As you seem only to have seen Extracts in the Magazines from the Account of East Florida, I send you the Book itself, which may afford you some farther Lights concerning the Country.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Du Pont De Nemours.

    London, ENG - 28 July 1768

    I RECEIVED your obliging letter of the 10th May, with the most acceptable present of your Physiocratie, which I have read with great pleasure, and received from it a great deal of instruction.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Barbeu Dubourg.

    London, ENG - 28 July 1768

    the new method of treating the small-pox, which you call the tonic or bracing method; I will take occasion from it to mention a practice to which I have accustomed myself.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to David Hall.

    London, ENG - 9 August 1768

    I have wrote my Mind fully to you in former Letters relating to the Stamp Act; so that I have but little to add, except what you desire to know about the 2 on Advertisements.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Alleyne.

    London, ENG - 9 August 1768

    You made an Apology to me for not acquaint' me sooner with your Marriage. I ought now to make an Apology to you for delaying so long the Answer to your Letter.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG - 18 August 1768

    QUERIES, recommended to the Consideration of those Gentlemen who are for vigorous measures with the Americans.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG - 25 August 1768

    Contractors, jobbing mercantile members of parliament, officers starving on half pay, and gunsmiths who toast, as the papers tell us, a speedy and a perpetual war, may wish, rather than no war at all, for a civil one in America.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Giambatista Beccaria.

    London, ENG - 21 September 1768

    The bearer of my letter is Monsieur L'Epinasse my good friend who is an ingenious electrician, one of the most excellent that we have.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 5 October 1768

    It feels very strange to me to have Ships and Packets come in, and no Letters from you. But I do not complain of it, because I know the reason is, my having written to you that I was coming home.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Crowley.

    London, ENG - 21 October 1768

    As you have printed here your letter of yesterday to your friend in America, and it may be long before you receive an answer from thence, permit me in the mean time to give you a few remarks on it, submitting them, as you have done your Letter, to th

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Mary Stevenson.

    London, ENG - 28 October 1768

    description

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG - 28 November 1768

    Your sentiments of the importance of the present dispute between Great Britain and the colonies appear to me extremely just. There is nothing I wish for more, than to see it amicably and equitably settled.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 21 December 1768

    I am made by this to apprehend that something is amiss, and perhaps have more Uneasiness from the Uncertainty, than I should have had if you had told me what it was.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Mary Stevenson.

    London, ENG -

    I have received the Garters you have so kindly knit for me ; they are of the only Sort that I can wear, having worn none of any kind for 20 Years, till you began to supply me; but besides their Usefulness, these appear to me the finest, neatest, and

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Henry Home.

    London, ENG - 1 January 1769

    I am glad to find you are turning your thoughts to political subjects, and particularly to those of money, taxes, manufactures, and commerce. The world is yet much in the dark on these important points

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Bartram.

    London, ENG - 9 January 1769

    I received your kind letter of November 5th, and the box directed to the King is since come to hand.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Jean Baptiste Le Roy.

    London, ENG - 31 January 1769

    The Farmer's Letters were written by one Mr. Dickinson, of Philadelphia, and not by me, as you seem to suppose. I only caused them to be reprinted here with that little Preface, and had no other hand in them

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Henry Home.

    London, ENG - 21 February 1769

    I received your excellent paper on the preferable use of oxen in agriculture, and have put it in the way of being communicated to the public here.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Cooper.

    London, ENG - 24 February 1769

    I was about to return home last Summer, and had some thoughts of doing it by way of Boston; but the untoward Situation of American Affairs here induc'd my Friends to advise my staying another Winter.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Winthrop.

    London, ENG - 0 March 1769

    At length after much Delay and Difficulty I have been able to obtain your Telescope, that was made by Mr. Short before his Death. His brother who succeeds in the Business has fitted it up and compleated it.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Jane Mecom.

    London, ENG - 27 April 1769

    I am now grown too old to be ambitious of such a station, as that which you say has been mentioned to you.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Cooper.

    London, ENG - 27 April 1769

    The Parliament remain fix'd in their Resolution not to repeal the Duty Acts this Session, and will rise next Tuesday. I hope my Country folks will remain as fix'd in their Resolutions of Industry and Frugality till these Acts are repeal'd.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG - 9 May 1769

    While the public attention is so much turned towards America, every letter from thence that promises new information, is pretty generally read.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Mary Stevenson.

    London, ENG - 27 June 1769

    Agreable to your Orders, delivered to me very punctually by Temple, I return you enclosed Voltaire's Verses. The Translation I think full as good as the Original.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Bartram.

    London, ENG - 9 July 1769

    you may yet be very useful to your country and to mankind, if you sit down quietly at home, digest the knowledge you have acquired, and compile and publish the many observations you have made

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG - 9 July 1769

    The letter was published, and universally spoken well of, as a well written, sensible, manly, and spirited performance; and I believe the publication has been of service to our cause.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to James Bowdoin.

    London, ENG - 13 July 1769

    I am honoured with yours of May 10th, and agree with you perfectly in your sentiments of public affairs. Government here seems now to be growing more moderate with regard to America

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Mary Stevenson.

    London, ENG - 2 September 1769

    JUST come home from a Venison Feast, where I have drank more than a Philosopher ought, I find my dear Polly's chearful, chatty Letter, that exhilirates me more than all the Wine.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Cooper.

    London, ENG - 3 September 1769

    I am just returned from France, where I found our Dispute much attended to, several of our Pamphlets being translated and printed there

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Cadwallader Evans.

    London, ENG - 7 September 1769

    I gave them immediately to Mr. Maskelyne, the Astronomer Royal, who will compare and digest the whole received from different parts of the world, and report thereon to the Royal Society.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Dalibard.

    London, ENG - 22 September 1769

    I embrace it to thank you most heartily for the many Civilities & Marks of Friendship I received from you & Mad. Dalibard, while in Paris

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Barbeu Dubourg.

    London, ENG - 22 September 1769

    With this you will receive some Sheets of the Piece now printing, and which I am promised shall be finish'd in a few Days. I am afraid it is not so correct as it should be

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Anthony Todd.

    London, ENG - 29 October 1769

    Discoursing with Captain Folger, a very intelligent Mariner of the Island of Nantucket, in New England, concerning the long Passages made by some ships bound from England to New York, I received from him the following Information

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to W Strahan.

    London, ENG - 29 November 1769

    I find yours of the 22 d , containing a number of Queries, that would require a Pamphlet to answer them fully. You, however, desire only brief Answers, which I shall endeavour to give you.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG -

    I make no doubt of the Truth of what the Papers tell us, that a certain great Person is half-starved on the Blade-Bone of a Sheep (I cannot call it of Mutton, there being none on it)

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Bartram.

    London, ENG - 0 January 1770

    I cannot make you adequate returns in kind ; but I send you however some of the true rhubarb seed, which you desire.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Mary Stevenson.

    London, ENG - 22 January 1770

    Your good Mother has complained more of her Head since you left us than ever before. If she stoops, or looks, or bends her Neck downwards, on any occasion, it is with great Pain and Difficulty, that she gets her Head up again.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Nevil Maskelyne.

    London, ENG - 12 February 1770

    I have just received a letter from Mr. Winthrop, dated December 7th, containing the following account

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Viny.

    London, ENG - 16 February 1770

    I can easily conceive the Difficulty a Man in your Situation, with such Connections, and so well esteemed and belov'd among them, must have in resolving to leave them with an Intention of Settling in a distant Country.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Michael Hillegas.

    London, ENG - 17 March 1770

    have made inquiries, as you desired, concerning the copper covering of houses. It has been used here in a few instances only, and the practice does not seem to gain ground.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG - 18 March 1770

    But, though both the Duke of Grafton and Lord North were and are, in my opinion, rather inclined to satisfy us, yet the Bedford party are so violent against us, and so prevalent in the council, that more moderate measures could not take place.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Cooper.

    London, ENG - 14 April 1770

    All Europe is attentive to the Dispute between Britain and the Colonies, & I own I have a Satisfaction in seeing, that our Part is taken Everywhere

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Mary Stevenson.

    London, ENG - 31 May 1770

    I write this Line just to say, that I am sure you are a much better Judge in this Affair of your own, than I can possibly be.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Jonathan Williams.

    London, ENG - 6 June 1770

    If I could have given you any intimation of the intentions of government with regard to America, that might be depended upon, you should have had them in good time for use

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Cooper.

    London, ENG - 8 June 1770

    As to the Standing Army kept up among us in time of Peace, without the Consent of our Assemblies, I am clearly of Opinion that it is not agreable to the Constitution.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Franklin.

    London, ENG - 8 June 1770

    I was happy to find that neither you, nor any of your family, were in the way of those murderers. I hope that before this time the town is quite freed from such dangerous and mischievous inmates.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 10 June 1770

    As to myself, I had from Christmas till Easter, a disagreable Giddiness hanging about me, which however did not hinder me from being about and doing Business.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Rhoads.

    London, ENG - 26 June 1770

    It appears to me of great Importance to build our DwellingHouses, if we can, in a Manner more secure from Danger by Fire.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Mary Hewson.

    London, ENG - 24 July 1770

    I am apt to love everybody that loves you, and therefore I suppose I shall in time love your new Mother, and new Sister, and your new Dolly.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Ewing.

    London, ENG - 27 August 1770

    I received your Favour of June 14, with several Copies of your Observations of the Transit of Venus, for which I thank you.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Cadwallader Evans.

    London, ENG - 27 August 1770

    Thanks for the books on the silk affair. It will give me great pleasure to see that business brought to perfection among us.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG - 22 September 1770

    It is whispered, that the new family administration, which took place on her Majesty's departure, promises, like all other new administrations, to govern much better than the old one.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Du Pont De Nemours.

    London, ENG - 2 October 1770

    I purpose returning to America in the ensuing Summer, if our Disputes should be adjusted, as I hope they will be in the next Session of Parliament.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Barbeu Dubourg.

    London, ENG - 2 October 1770

    We only assert, that, having Parliaments of our own, and not having representatives in that of Great Britain, our Parliaments are the only judges of what we can and what we ought to contribute

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 3 October 1770

    I am glad your little Grandson recovered so soon of his Illness, as I see you are quite in Love with him, and your Happiness wrapt up in his

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Gushing.

    London, ENG - 24 December 1770

    Your favour of October 31st came to hand a few days since, with the vote of the House of Representatives appointing me their agent here, which, as it was unsolicited on my part, I esteem the greater honour

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Jane Mecom.

    London, ENG - 30 December 1770

    As to the Rumor you mention, (which was, as Josiah tells me, that I had been deprived of my Place in the PostOffice on account of a Letter I wrote to Philadelphia,) it might have this Foundation

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Cooper.

    London, ENG - 30 December 1770

    I esteem the Appointment to the Agency of your Province, unexpected and unsolicited by me, as one of the greatest Honours for which I must think myself indebted to your Friendship.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Cooper.

    London, ENG - 5 February 1771

    In the same Confidence I send you the inclosed Extract from my Journal, containing a late Conference between the Secretary and your Friend, in which you will see a little of his Temper

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to James Bowdoin.

    London, ENG - 5 February 1771

    I am very sensible of the honour done me by your House of Representatives, in appointing me their Agent here. It will make me extreamly happy, if I can render them any valuable Service.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Gushing.

    London, ENG - 5 February 1771

    The doctrine of the right of Parliament to lay taxes on America is now almost generally given up here, and one seldom meets in conversation with any, who continue to assert it.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Rhoads.

    London, ENG - 10 February 1771

    I am glad to hear that you have good Workmen in the Stucco Way, and that it is likely to take place of Wainscot.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Cadwallader Evans.

    London, ENG - 10 February 1771

    I have not now before me your letter, which came with the sample of silk, having put it into the hands of Mr. Walpole with the sample, who has promised me full and particular answers to all your queries, after the silk has been thoroughly examined.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Recipient First Williams.

    London, ENG - 5 March 1771

    I received your kind Letter with your Sons. They are, I assure you, exceeding welcome to me ; and they behave with so much Prudence, that no two young Men could possibly less need the Advice you would have me give them.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Jonathan Williams.

    London, ENG - 5 March 1771

    I suppose Jonathan has told you, that the lottery is drawn, and your two new tickets had the same success as the former, namely, one twenty-pound prize, and one blank. Would you go on any further?

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Robert Morris.

    London, ENG - 5 March 1771

    Notwithstanding the ample Recommendations brought over by M r Winter, the Bishop of London has refused him Ordination, for two Reasons, as I understand, his mechanical Education, and his Connection with M r Whitefield & the Methodists.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 20 April 1771

    The Board are not favourably disposed towards your Insolvent Acts, pretending to doubt whether distant Creditors, particularly such as reside in England, may not sometimes be injured by them.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Humphrey Marshall.

    London, ENG - 22 April 1771

    It gave me Pleasure to hear, that tho' the Merchants had departed from their Agreement of NonImportation, the Spirit of Industry and Frugality was likely to continue among the People.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG - 15 May 1771

    I think one may clearly see, in the system of customs to be exacted in America by act of Parliament, the seeds sown of a total disunion of the two countries, though, as yet, that event may be at a considerable distance.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Isaac Smith.

    London, ENG - 17 May 1771

    A good general Rule in travelling foreign Countries, is, to avoid as much as possible all Disputes, & to be contented with such Provisions and Cookery, as you meet with in the Inns

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 5 June 1771

    The Joy was in a fair way of being doubled on the same Day, for the Queen was deliver' d early this Morning of another Prince, the eighth Child, there being now six Princes and two Princesses, all lovely Children.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Cushing.

    London, ENG - 10 June 1771

    All Views or Expectations of drawing any considerable Revenue to this Country from the Colonies are, I believe, generally given over, and it seems probable that nothing of that kind will ever again be attempted.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Jonathan Shipley.

    London, ENG - 24 June 1771

    I have taken the Liberty of sending by the Southampton Stage, which goes to-morrow, a Parcel directed to your Lordship, to be left at the Turnpike next beyond Winchester, containing one of my Books for Miss Georgiana

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Wimberly Jones.

    London, ENG - 3 July 1771

    I see by the newspapers that your new Assembly is also dissolved. I am sorry for these differences, which must be uncomfortable to you and all that wish the welfare of the province.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Cadwallader Evans.

    London, ENG - 4 July 1771

    I was disappointed till lately, when I had a meeting with Mr. Patterson, esteemed one of the best judges of that commodity, who favoured me with the enclosed paper, and, in conversation, with the following particulars.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Franklin.

    London, ENG - 12 July 1771

    Yesterday a very odd accident happened, which I must mention to you, as it relates to your grandfather.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Bartram.

    London, ENG - 17 July 1771

    As to your pension, there is not, I believe, the least reason for you to apprehend its being stopped. I know not who receives it for you here, or I should quicken them in writing to you.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Cadwallader Evans.

    London, ENG - 18 July 1771

    The European silk I understand is all yellow, and most of the India silk. What comes from China is white.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Johnathan Shipley.

    London, ENG - 25 July 1771

    I SHOULD have been happy in accompanying your Lordship on that agreable Party, or in being at Twyford instead of this dusty Town; but Business kept me here longer than I expected.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 14 August 1771

    I am glad to hear of all your Welfares, and that the Pictures &c. were safe arrived. You do not tell me who mounted the great one, nor where you have hung it up.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Strahan.

    Edinburgh, SCT - 27 October 1771

    But that excellent Christian David Hume, agreable to the Precepts of the Gospel, has received the Stranger, and I now live with him at his House in the new Town most happily.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Strahan.

    Edinburgh, SCT - 17 November 1771

    I have been at Blair Drummond on a visit to my friend Lord Kames, thence I went to Glasgow, thence to Carron Works, viewing the Canal by the way.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Mary Hewson.

    Preston, ENG - 25 November 1771

    I thank you for your Intelligence about my Godson. I believe you are sincere, when you say you think him as fine a Child as you wish to see.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Alexander Dick.

    London, ENG - 0 January 1772

    My last Expedition convinced me that I grow too old for Rambling, and that 'twas probable I should never make such another Journey.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to unknown.

    London, ENG - 13 January 1772

    The town now begins to fill with members of Parliament, and great officers of state coming in daily to celebrate the Queen's birthday, and be present at the opening of the session

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Gushing.

    London, ENG - 13 January 1772

    Tho' my Constitution, and too great Confinement to Business during the Winter, seem to require the Air and Exercise of a long Journey once a Year, which I have now practised for more than 20 Years past, yet I should not have been out so long this Tim

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Jane Mecom.

    London, ENG - 13 January 1772

    I have now been some weeks returned from my journey through Wales, Ireland, Scotland, and the North of England, which, besides being an agreeable tour with a pleasant companion, has contributed to the establishment of my health

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joshua Babcock.

    London, ENG - 13 January 1772

    I have lately made a Tour thro' Ireland and Scotland. In those Countries a small Part of the Society are Landlords, great Noblemen, and Gentlemen, extreamly opulent, living in the highest Affluence and Magnificence

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to James Bowdoin.

    London, ENG - 13 January 1772

    The Governing of Colonies by Instructions has long been a favourite Point with Ministers here.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Ezra Styles.

    London, ENG - 13 January 1772

    There is no doubt of its being a genuine Translation of the Books at present deem'd sacred as the Writings of Zoroaster by his Followers

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Cooper.

    London, ENG - 13 January 1772

    The Attempt to get the Commissioners exempted from the Payment of their Taxes, by an Instruction to the Governor, is the most indiscrete Thing, surely, to say nothing of its Injustice

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Franklin.

    London, ENG - 13 January 1772

    I knew a wise old Man, who us'd to advise his young Friends to chuse Wives out of a Bunch ; for where there were many Daughters, he said they improv'd each other, and from Emulation acquired more Accomplishments

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Anthony Tissington.

    London, ENG - 28 January 1772

    I received your very kind Letter of the i5' h together with the Turkey, which prov'd exceeding fine. We regal'd a Number of our Friends with it

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 28 January 1772

    I am much pleas'd with your little Histories of our Grand son, & happy in thinking how much Amusement he must afford you. I pray that God may continue him to us

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Sarah Bache.

    London, ENG - 29 January 1772

    You might easily learn Accounts, and you can copy Letters, or write them very well upon Occasion. By Industry & Frugality you may get forward in the World, being both of you yet young.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 30 January 1772

    At Dublin we saw and were entertained by both Parties, the Courtiers & the Patriots. The latter treated me with particular Respect.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Richard Price.

    London, ENG - 0 February 1772

    Permit me to thank you, not only on my own Account for the Book itself you have so kindly sent me, but in Behalf of the Publick for Writing it

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Foxcroft.

    London, ENG - 4 February 1772

    It is a common Error in Friends when they would extol their Friend, to make Comparisons & to depreciate the Merits of others.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Bond.

    London, ENG - 5 February 1772

    I suppose your Son Richard will spend some time in London, where by what I have heard, Physic and Surgery may be studied to as great Advantage as in any Part of the World, by Attending the Anatomical Lectures

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Cadwallader Evans.

    London, ENG - 6 February 1772

    The trunks of silk were detained at the customhouse till very lately; first, because of the holidays, and then waiting to get two persons, skilful in silk, to make a valuation of it, in order to ascertain the bounty.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Wimberley Jones.

    London, ENG - 2 April 1772

    Your Account of the Governor's Treatment of the Assembly & your self, determined me to wait upon him on his Arrival here, as we can not but greatly disapprove his Conduct.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Gushing.

    London, ENG - 13 April 1772

    The Parliament has been employed in the royal marriage bill, and other business; nothing of importance relating to a First published by Sparks.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Jean Baptiste Le Roy.

    London, ENG - 20 April 1772

    Mr. West, our President, concerning whom you make enquiry, is esteemed a good Antiquarian, but has not distinguish'd himself in any other Branch of Science.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Priestly.

    London, ENG - 4 May 1772

    I think with you that there cannot be the least Occasion for my explaining your Method of impregnating water with fix'd air to Messrs. Banks and Solander, as they were present

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 5 May 1772

    I thank you for your Advice about putting back a Fit of the Gout. I shall never attempt such a Thing.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Dawson.

    London, ENG - 29 May 1772

    Having visited yesterday, as you desired, the powder magazines at Purfleet, in order to see how they may be protected against danger from lightning, I think...

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Du Pont De Nemours.

    London, ENG - 15 June 1772

    I am much obliged to you for introducing me to the Knowledge of M. le Marquis d'Ecrammeville, who appears a very amiable Man, with an excellent Understanding.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Francis Maseres.

    London, ENG - 17 June 1772

    I thank you for the pamphlets proposing to establish Life Annuities in Parishes, &c. I think it an excellent one.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 14 July 1772

    I am just returned from a Journey of near a Month, which has given a new Spring to my Health and Spirits.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Du Pont De Nemours.

    London, ENG - 12 August 1772

    I am concerned to understand lately that you have never been paid as I expected for the Ephemerides, and therefore I send you three Guineas

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 17 August 1772

    At length we have got rid of Lord Hillsborough, and Lord Dartmouth takes his place, to the great satisfaction of all the friends of America.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 19 August 1772

    As Lord Hillsborough in fact got nothing out of me, I should rather suppose he threw me away as an orange that would yield no juice, and therefore not worth more squeezing.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 19 August 1772

    The resolution you have taken to use more exercise is extremely proper; and I hope you will steadily perform it. It is of the greatest importance to prevent diseases, since the cure of them by physic is so very precarious.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Galloway.

    London, ENG - 22 August 1772

    Lord Hillsborough, mortified by the Committee of Council's approbation of our grant, in opposition to his report, has resigned.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Bartram.

    London, ENG - 22 August 1772

    I am glad the Rhubarb Seed got safe to hand. I make no doubt of its Thriving well in our Country

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Anthony Benezet.

    London, ENG - 22 August 1772

    I am glad to hear that the disposition against keeping negroes grows more general in North America. Several pieces have been lately printed here against the practice

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Smith.

    London, ENG - 22 August 1772

    I received yours of May 16 with the Box of Books, and have already delivered and forwarded most of them as directed.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Gushing.

    London, ENG - 3 September 1772

    Lord Dartmouth, now our American minister, is at present in the country, and will probably not be in town till the season of business comes on. I shall then immediately put the petition into his hands

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Walsh.

    London, ENG - 6 September 1772

    Nothing new in the Philosophic Way has occurred here since my last, in which I think I mentioned Dr. Priestly's Experiments

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Huske.

    London, ENG - 6 September 1772

    America is infinitely oblig'd to you for your continued good Wishes & Schemes for her Advantage : But I am sorry to tell you that she is here become an Object of Jealousy

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Priestley.

    London, ENG - 19 September 1772

    To get over this, my Way is, to divide half a Sheet of Paper by a Line into two Columns ; writing over the one Pro, and over the other Con.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Georgiana Shipley.

    London, ENG - 26 September 1772

    I LAMENT with you most sincerely the unfortunate end of poor MUNGO. Few squirrels were better accomplished; for he had had a good education, had travelled far, and seen much of the world.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Richard Price.

    London, ENG - 28 September 1772

    I did not advise him pro or con, but only explain'd to him my method of judging for myself in doubtful cases, by what I called Prudential Algebra.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Richard Bache.

    London, ENG - 7 October 1772

    I am surprised to hear that the Dutchman I assisted with 25 Guineas turned out a Rogue; and that Sheets has paid nothing of what I furnished him when here. I am afraid I do not grow wiser as I grow older.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Bartram.

    London, ENG - 17 October 1772

    I hope the Rhubarb you have sown and distributed will be taken care of. There seems to me no doubt of its doing as well with us as in Scotland. Remember that for Use the Root does not come to its Perfection of Power and Virtue in less than Seven Year

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 3 November 1772

    Lord Dartmouth came to town last Week, and had his first Levee on Wednesday, at which I attended. He received me very politely in his Room

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Stirling.

    London, ENG - 3 November 1772

    On my Return to Town I found your Favour, with the Schemes of your Lottery, to which I wish Success

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Jonathan Williams.

    London, ENG - 3 November 1772

    If that should take place, my request is that you would lay out the sum of fifty pounds, lawful money, in bedding or such other furniture as my sister shall think proper to be given the new-married couple

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Peter Timothy.

    London, ENG - 3 November 1772

    It is so difficult a matter to obtain anything of the kind, that I think to leave a good Trade in hopes of an Office, is quitting a Certainty for an Uncertainty, and losing Substance for Shadow.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Gushing.

    London, ENG - 4 November 1772

    Lord Dartmouth, our American minister, came to town last week, and held his first levee on Wednesday

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Deborah Franklin.

    London, ENG - 1 December 1772

    I am glad to hear you continue so well, and that the Pains in your Side and Head have left you. Eat light Foods, such as Fowls, Mutton, etc., and but little Beef or Bacon, avoid strong Tea, and use what Exercise you can

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Thomas Gushing.

    London, ENG - 2 December 1772

    A few Days after my leaving your Petition with Lord Dartmouth, his Lordship sent for me to discourse with me upon it.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to William Franklin.

    London, ENG - 2 December 1772

    I am persuaded that your Packets were not open'd at the Office; for tho' a Secretary of the State has the Power of ordering Letters to be opened, I think it is seldom used but in times of War, Rebellion, or on some great publick Occasion

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Abel James.

    London, ENG - 2 December 1772

    I do not at this Distance understand the Politics of your last Election, why so many of the Members declin'd the Service, and why yourself and Mr. Fox were omitted

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to Joseph Galloway.

    London, ENG - 2 December 1772

    We must not in the Course of Publick Life expect immediate Approbation and immediate grateful Acknowledgment of our Services. But let us persevere thro' Abuse and even Injury.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Jay.

    Passy, FRA - 13 June 1780

    Several of them appear to have been opened, the paper round the seals being smoked and burnt, as with the flame of a candle used to soften the wax, and the impression defaced. The curiosity of people in this time of war is unbounded.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Jay.

    Passy, FRA - 2 October 1780

    the storm of bills which I found coming upon us both, has terrified and vexed me to such a degree that I have been deprived of sleep, and so much indisposed by continual anxiety, as to be rendered almost incapable of writing.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Jay.

    Passy, FRA - 22 April 1782

    I have undertaken to pay all the bills of your acceptance that have come to my knowledge, and I hope in God no more will be drawn upon us

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Jay.

    Passy, FRA - 24 April 1782

    In consequence of a proposition I sent over, the parliament of Britain have just passed an act for exchanging American prisoners. They have near 1100 in the jails of England and Ireland, all committed as charged with high treason.

  • Benjamin Franklin letter to John Jay.

    Passy, FRA - 10 September 1783

    having now spent fifty years of my life in public offices and trusts, and having still one ambition left, that of carrying the character of fidelity, at least, to the grave with me, I cannot allow that I was behind any of them in zeal and faithfulnes