Benedict Arnold Letters for the years 1775 thru 1780

Benedict Arnold

Benedict Arnold wrote 58 Letters from a total of 27 locations including Fort Western, ME, Kennebec River, ME, and St Marie, QC, CAN. Benedict Arnold wrote a total of 8 people including George Washington, and Philip Schuyler. Most of Benedict Arnold's letters were written in the year 1776. Several other letters were written in 1775 and 1777. Who did Benedict Arnold know? View Benedict Arnold's social graph.

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  • sponsored contentBenedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Fort Western, ME - 25 September 1775

    I found the bateaux completed, but many of them smaller than the directions given, and very badly built ; of course I have been obliged to order twenty more, to bring on the remainder of the provisions

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Kennebec River, ME - 13 October 1775

    The men in general not understanding bateaux, have been obliged to wade, and haul them more than half way up the river.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Richard Montgomery.

    St Marie, QC, CAN - 8 November 1775

    I can only say we have hauled our bateaux up over falls, up rapid streams, over carrying-places, and marched through morasses, thick woods, and over mountains, about three hundred and twenty miles

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Richard Montgomery.

    Point Levy, QC, CAN - 13 November 1775

    The winds have been so high, these three nights, that I have not been able to cross the river. I have near forty canoes ready

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Hector Cramahe.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 14 November 1775

    The unjust, cruel, and tyrannical acts of a venal British Parliament, tending to enslave the American Colonies, have obliged them to appeal to God and the sword for redress.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Richard Montgomery.

    Colvil Place, QC, CAN - 14 November 1775

    I wrote you yesterday from Point Levy, by an express sent from Sorel, by Colonel Easton, of my intention of crossing the St. Lawrence, which I happily effected between nine and four in the morning

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Richard Montgomery.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 16 November 1775

    I am very anxious to hear from you, and much more to see you here.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Point-aux-trembles, QC, CAN - 20 November 1775

    It was judged prudent, in our situation, not to hazard a battle, but retire to this place, eight leagues from Quebec, which we did yesterday, and are waiting here with impatience the arrival of General Montgomery

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Richard Montgomery.

    Point-aux-trembles, QC, CAN - 20 November 1775

    upon examination, great part of our cartridges proved unfit for service, and, to my great surprise, we had no more than five rounds for each man, and near one hundred muskets unfit for service.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 5 December 1775

    I continued at Point-aux-Trembles until the 3d instant, when, to my great joy, General Montgomery joined us, with artillery, and about three hundred men.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to David Wooster.

    , QC, CAN - 31 December 1775

    I make no doubt but General Montgomery acquainted you with his intentions of storming Quebec as soon as a good opportunity offered.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to David Wooster.

    , QC, CAN - 2 January 1776

    I wrote you, three days since, of our defeat, and the death of General Montgomery and others, with all the information I then had of the matter.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 11 January 1776

    The disposition of the Canadians is very favorable to your wishes ; the only bar of consequence is Quebec. As this is the key, so, in a great measure, it governs the whole country, who having been so long habituated to slavery

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 12 January 1776

    General Wooster has acquainted me he cannot leave Montreal, but has sent down Colonel Clinton, to whom I shall resign the command, until my wound will permit my doing duty

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 14 January 1776

    Our loss and repulse struck an amazing panic into both officers and men, and, had the enemy improved their advantage, our affairs here must have been entirely ruined.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 24 January 1776

    It is very probable the city would surrender before half, or perhaps one quarter, of the shot, shells, &c. in my memorandum were expended; but, if they should make an obstinate resistance, perhaps the whole will be necessary.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 1 February 1776

    I have the pleasure of acquainting you, that we still hold our ground before Quebec, and keep the enemy closely blockaded, though we have received but a small reenforcement of one hundred and fifty men from Montreal.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 27 February 1776

    The enemy, to the number of about five hundred, have twice sallied out at Palace Gate, with design of seizing our field-pieces

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 20 April 1776

    Inclosed is a list of our force before Quebec, which, I am I sorry to say, is so very inconsiderable, and illy supplied with every requisite to carry on a siege, that I am very dubious of their success.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 30 April 1776

    I have the pleasure to acquaint you of the safe arrival of the gentlemen from Congress, in good health and spirits.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 8 May 1776

    I heartily congratulate you on the success of your arms against Boston, and am sorry it is not in my power to give you a more pleasing account of our affairs in this country, which wear no very favorable aspect at present.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    Sorel, QC, CAN - 15 May 1776

    I have purchased twenty-seven hundred bushels of wheat of Captain Cuthbert, at four shillings and sixpence, lawful money, payable in our paper bills of exchange, or an order on Congress

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    Sorel, QC, CAN - 17 May 1776

    I am. very happy to find you are in sentiments with me in respect to the smallpox.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    Lachine, QC, CAN - 25 May 1776

    One of our men this moment came in, who was taken at the Cedars. He made his escape this morning, and says we have lost only ten privates killed; the rest are prisoners at St. Ann's and the Cedars.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    St Ann, QC, CAN - 27 May 1776

    I had sent early in the morning to the savages, demanding a surrender of our prisoners, and, in case of refusal, and that any of them were murdered, I would sacrifice every Indian who fell into my hands

  • Benedict Arnold letter to John Sullivan.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 5 June 1776

    I think it absolutely necessary some effectual methods should be taken with the savages immediately, or we shall be obliged to keep up a large force here.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 6 June 1776

    Our want of almost every necessary for the army, and repeated misfortunes and losses, have greatly dispirited the troops. Our enemies are daily increasing, and our friends deserting us.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to John Sullivan.

    Chamblee, QC, CAN - 10 June 1776

    Shall we sacrifice the few men we have, by endeavouring to keep possession of a small part of the country, which can be of little or no service to us ?

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 10 June 1776

    There was a meeting of those Indians and several other tribes at Caghnawaga, some of whom agreed to deliver up the hatchet received from Governor Carleton last year, and remain neuter in the present dispute.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Lachine, QC, CAN - 13 June 1776

    Burgoyne is with the enemy. Seventy transports, and, by the best accounts, ten thousand troops, are arrived in Quebec.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    St Ann, QC, CAN - 13 June 1776

    We have a report here, that on Sunday last our army, of about two thousand men, under the command of General Thompson, attacked the enemy near Three Rivers, and were repulsed

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 25 June 1776

    By this express you will receive advice from General Schuyler of our evacuating Canada, an event which I make no doubt (from our distressed situation) you have some time expected.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 30 July 1776

    I left them such directions as I thought necessary, and orders to begin four row-galleys, nearly of the construction of those built in Philadelphia, to carry four pieces heavy and two pieces light cannon each.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Skenesborough, NY - 8 August 1776

    The carpenters go on with great spirit. Eight gondolas will be completed in a few days. One row-galley is gone to Ticonderoga, and will soon be fitted and armed.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Horatio Gates.

    Button Mould Bay, VT - 31 August 1776

    Inclosed is a return of the strength of the fleet, by which you will observe that seventy-four men are wanting to complete the numbers proposed for the vessels, which are barely sufficient when complete.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Horatio Gates.

    Willsborough, NY - 2 September 1776

    I have some thoughts of going to Congress, and begging leave to resign. Do you think they will make me a Major-General?

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Horatio Gates.

    Windmill Point, VT - 7 September 1776

    I have posted my guard-boats at a point running into the Lake, about one mile below us. The enemy's boats have several times appeared on the Lake, with a view of decoying our boats

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Horatio Gates.

    Schuylers Island, NY - 12 October 1776

    At half past twelve the engagement became general, and very warm. Some of the enemy's ships, and all their gondolas, beat and rowed up within musket shot of us.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 15 October 1776

    They kept up an incessant fire upon us for about five glasses, with round and grape shot, which we returned as briskly. The sails, rigging, and hull of the Congress were shattered and torn in pieces

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 24 October 1776

    I am extremely glad to hear the militia are coming to our assistance. I believe the enemy, from the best accounts we can collect, are endeavouring to fortify Crown Point.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Hector Cramahe.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 15 November 1776

    This I imputed to the ignorance of your guards, and ordered him to return this morning, and, to my great surprise, he was received in the same manner as yesterday.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 13 January 1777

    There are, at this place and in the vicinity, about two thousand men, part of six thousand ordered from the New England States. The others are on their march, and expected in, a few days.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 31 January 1777

    By the best intelligence we have been able to procure of the enemy's force on Rhode Island, it consisted of about six thousand men; eleven regiments of British, and four of Hessians.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 11 March 1777

    The new levies of the Massachusetts Bay being all ordered to Ticonderoga, and those of Connecticut inoculated for the smallpox, deprives us of the aid of Continental troops, on whom we had placed our chief dependence.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Providence, RI - 26 March 1777

    I was made very unhappy, a few days since, by hearing your Excellency was exceedingly ill with a fever.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Cornells Ferry, PA - 16 June 1777

    As the militia can be but illy spared at this busy season, I wish to know, as early as possible, your Excellency's orders respecting them ; if you wish to have them in the Jerseys or on this side the Delaware.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Horatio Gates.

    German Flats, NY - 21 August 1777

    I leave this place this morning with twelve hundred Continental troops, officers included, and a handful of militia, for Fort Schuyler, which is still besieged by a number equal to ours.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Horatio Gates.

    Fort Dayton, NY - 23 August 1777

    The excessively bad roads, and necessary precautions in marching through a thick wood, retarded us so much, that we have but this moment reached this place

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Horatio Gates.

    German Flats, NY - 28 August 1777

    You may depend on my joining you as soon as possible with my detachment, about twelve hundred men. Few Indians will be with me.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 June 1778

    Fifty volunteers have engaged to go with General Cadwalader, who this minute informs me he expects to collect a considerable number more in the morning

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 May 1779

    If your Excellency thinks me criminal, for Heaven's sake let me be immediately tried, and, if found guilty, executed. I want no favor ; I ask only for justice.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 March 1780

    From the injury I have received in my leg, and the great stiffness in my ankle, my surgeons are of opinion it will not be prudent for me to take a command in the army for some time to come.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Robinsons House, NY - 6 August 1780

    On my arrival at this post, I found every thing thrown into great confusion, by the troops removing from hence, and the militia coming in.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Robinsons House, NY - 8 August 1780

    I wish your Excellency would be kind enough to order Mr. Erskine to send me a map of the country from this place to New York, particularly on the east side of the river, which would be very useful to me.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Dobbs Ferry, NY - 11 September 1780

    I came here this morning, in order to establish signals, to be observed in case the enemy came up the river ; to give some directions respecting the guard-boats ; and to have a beacon fixed upon the mountain

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Robinsons House, NY - 12 September 1780

    The order, contained in the postscript of your Excellency's letter of the 7th, to send the eight bargemen of Colonel Putnam's regiment to join their regiment, I conceive to be on a supposition of their being idle at West Point.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Robinsons House, NY - 14 September 1780

    I am, therefore, of opinion, that the Pennsylvania line, which I suppose to amount to twenty-five hundred or three thousand men, should hold themselves in readiness to march

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Robinsons House, NY - 16 September 1780

    My answers to the questions proposed by your Excellency to the Council of War I will do myself the honor to deliver in person.