Abigail Adams Letters for the years 1784 thru 1816

Abigail Adams

Abigail Adams wrote 63 Letters from a total of 9 locations including On Board Ship Active, Auteuil, FRA, and London, ENG. Abigail Adams wrote a total of 16 people including Mary Cranch, and Elizabeth Shaw. Most of Abigail Adams's letters were written in the year 1785. Several other letters were written in 1786 and 1787. Who did Abigail Adams know? View Abigail Adams's social graph.

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  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    On Board Ship Active - 6 July 1784

    I have been sixteen days at sea, and have not attempted to write a single letter. 'T is true, I have kept a journal whenever I was able ; but that must be close locked up, unless I was sure to hand it you with safety.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Lucy Cranch.

    Auteuil, FRA - 5 September 1784

    I promised to write to you from the Hague, but your uncle's unexpected arrival at London prevented me. Your uncle purchased an excellent travelling coach in London, and hired a post-chaise for our servants.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    Auteuil, FRA - 5 September 1784

    Auteuil is a village four miles distant from Paris, and one from Passy. The house we have taken is large, commodious, and agreeably situated, near the Woods of Boulogne, which belong to the King, and which Mr. Adams calls his park

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    Auteuil, FRA - 9 December 1784

    I go into Paris sometimes to the plays, of which I am very fond ; but I so severely pay for it, that I refrain many times upon account of my health. It never fails giving me a severe headache

  • Abigail Adams letter to Elizabeth Shaw.

    Auteuil, FRA - 14 December 1784

    From the interest you take in every thing which concerns your friends, I hear you inquiring how I do, how I live, whom I see, where I visit, who visit me.

  • Abigail Adams letter to John Shaw.

    Auteuil, FRA - 18 January 1785

    Amongst the public edifices which are worthy of notice in this country, are several churches. I went, a few days since, to see three of the most celebrated in Paris.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Storer.

    Auteuil, FRA - 20 January 1785

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  • Abigail Adams letter to Lucy Cranch.

    Auteuil, FRA - 24 January 1785

    And in the first place, my dear Lucy, shall I find a little fault with you ? A fault, from which neither your good sister, nor cousin Abby, is free. It is that all of you so much neglect your handwriting.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    Auteuil, FRA - 20 February 1785

    I have seen many of the beauties, and some of the deformities, of this old world. I have been more than ever convinced, that there is no summit of virtue, and no depth of vice, which human nature is not capable of rising to, on the one hand, or sinki

  • Abigail Adams letter to Lucy Cranch.

    Auteuil, FRA - 7 May 1785

    Well, my dear niece, I have returned from Mr. Adams's. When I got there, I found a pretty large company. It consisted of the Marquis and Madame de la Fayette...

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    Auteuil, FRA - 8 May 1785

    Can my dear sister realize that it is near eleven months since I left her ? To me it seems incredible ; more like a dream than a reality. Yet it ought to appear the longest ten months of my life

  • Abigail Adams letter to Elizabeth Shaw.

    Auteuil, FRA - 8 May 1785

    You can hardly form an idea how difficult and expensive it is to be housekeeping a few months at a time in so many different countries. It has been Mr. Adams's fortune, ever since he came abroad, not to live a year at a time in one place.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    London, ENG - 24 June 1785

    The sitting of Parliament, the birth-day of the King, and the famous celebration of the music of Handel at Westminster Abbey had drawn together such a concourse of people, that we were glad to get into lodgings at the moderate price of a guinea per d

  • Abigail Adams letter to Elizabeth Shaw.

    London, ENG - 15 August 1785

    It is one of the finest squares in London. The air is as pure as it can be so near a great city. It is but a small distance from Hyde Park, round which I sometimes walk, but oftener ride.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Lucy Cranch.

    London, ENG - 27 August 1785

    It is usual at a large entertainment, to bring the solid food in the first course. The second consists of lighter diet, kickshaws, trifles, whip syllabub, &c. ; the third is the dessert, consisting of the fruits of the season, and sometimes foreign s

  • Abigail Adams letter to John Quincy Adams.

    London, ENG - 6 September 1785

    The chocolate grew cold, the top of the tea-pot was forgotten, and the bread and butter went down uneaten. Yet nobody felt the loss of breakfast. So near akin are joy and grief, that the effect is often similar.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    London, ENG - 30 September 1785

    With these ideas, you may be sure my countenance will never wear that suppliant appearance, which begs for notice. Consequently, I never expect to be a Court favorite.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    London, ENG - 1 October 1785

    You must know that yesterday the whole diplomatic corps dined here ; that is, his Lordship the Marquis of Carmarthen, and all the foreign ministers, fifteen in all, and to-day the newspapers proclaim it.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Elizabeth Shaw.

    London, ENG - 4 March 1786

    I seldom feel a sufficient stimulus for writing until I hear that a vessel is just about to sail, and then I find myself so deep in debt, that I know not where to begin to discharge the account ; but it is time for me to be a little more provident

  • Abigail Adams letter to Lucy Cranch.

    London, ENG - 2 April 1786

    The social affections are and may be made the truest channels for our pleasures and comforts to flow through. Heaven formed us not for ourselves but others

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    London, ENG - 6 April 1786

    When a body has attended one of these parties, you know the whole of the entertainment. There were about two hundred persons present last evening. Three large rooms full of card-tables

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    London, ENG - 21 May 1786

    I thank you most sincerely for all your kindness to my dear sons, and hope they will ever bear a grateful remembrance of it ; the account you give of their behaviour and conduct is such as I hope they merit.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Lucy Cranch.

    London, ENG - 20 July 1786

    the other day a gentleman presented me with a card to go and see the corpse of the Duke of Northumberland, who died at his house in the country, but was brought here to be laid in state.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    London, ENG - 12 September 1786

    By the last vessels, I wrote some of my friends that I was going to visit Holland. That I had a desire to see that country you will not wonder at

  • Abigail Adams letter to John Quincy Adams.

    London, ENG - 27 September 1786

    Since I wrote you last, I have made two excursions, one to Holland, and one of a week to the Hyde, the seat of Mr. Brand-Hollis. Here I was both entertained and delighted.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Elizabeth Shaw.

    London, ENG - 21 November 1786

    This being so wholly groundless, it roused the quick feelings of Mr. Adams, who replied, a little warmly, Give me leave to tell you, Sir, that people who hold this language, betray a total ignorance of the subject.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    London, ENG - 20 January 1787

    I will now give you some account of my late tour to Bath, that seat of fashionable resort, where, like the rest of the world, I spent a fortnight in amusement and dissipation, but returned, I assure you, with double pleasure to my own fireside

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    London, ENG - 25 February 1787

    I think I should not feel more anxious if I was in the midst of all the disturbances, than I do at this distance, where imagination is left at full liberty. When law and justice are laid prostrate, who or what is secure ?

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    London, ENG - 23 April 1787

    We have accounts, by way of New York, to the 8th of March, which inform us that General Lincoln had met with more resistance from the insurgents than we had reason to expect from former accounts

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    London, ENG - 16 July 1787

    I have had with me for a fortnight a little daughter of Mr. Jefferson's, who arrived here with a young negro girl, her servant, from Virginia.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Mary Cranch.

    London, ENG - 15 September 1787

    When I wrote you last, I was just going to set out on a journey to the West of England. I promised you to visit Mr. Cranch's friends and relatives. This we did, as I shall relate to you.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Lucy Cranch.

    London, ENG - 3 October 1787

    I have given your mamma and sister some account of my late excursion to Devonshire. We returned home through Bristol, and took Oxford in our way

  • Abigail Adams letter to John Quincy Adams.

    London, ENG - 12 October 1787

    I cannot begin my letter by thanking you for yours. You write so seldom that you do not give me the opportunity. Yet I think you would feel disappointed if you did not get a few lines from me.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Elizabeth Shaw.

    Richmond Hill, NY - 27 September 1789

    I write to you, my dear sister, not from the disputed banks of the Potomac, the Susquehanna, or the Delaware, but from the peaceful borders of the Hudson ; a situation where the hand of nature has so lavishly displayed her beauties

  • Abigail Adams letter to Thomas Brand.

    New York, NY - 6 September 1790

    If my heart had not done you more justice than my pen, I would disown it. I have so long omitted writing to you, that my conscience has been a very severe accuser of me.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Abigail Smith.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 November 1790

    Bush Hill is a very beautiful place. But the grand and sublime I left at Richmond Hill. The cultivation in sight and prospect are superior, but the Schuylkill is no more like the Hudson, than I to Hercules.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Abigail Smith.

    Bush Hill, PA - 26 December 1790

    On Friday evening last, I went with Charles to the drawing-room, being the first of my appearance in public. The room became full before I left it, and the circle very brilliant.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Abigail Smith.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 January 1791

    I think you do perfectly right in refusing to go into public during the absence of Colonel Smith. The society of a few friends is that from which most pleasure and satisfaction are to be derived.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Abigail Smith.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 January 1791

    You must not flatter yourself with the expectation of hearing from Colonel Smith until the February packet arrives. It is as soon as you ought to think of it.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Abigail Smith.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 February 1791

    The education of your children will occupy much of your time, and you will always keep in mind the great importance of first principles, and the necessity of instilling the precepts of morality very early into their minds.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Elizabeth Shaw.

    Bush Hill, PA - 20 March 1791

    We have had a very severe winter in this State, as you may judge when I tell you that we have consumed forty cords of wood in four months. It has been as cold as any winter we have at the northward.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Abigail Smith.

    Quincy, MA - 3 February 1794

    I go from home but very little, yet I do not find my time hang heavy upon my hands. You know that I have no aversion to join in the cheerful circle, or mix in the world, when opportunity offers.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Abigail Smith.

    Quincy, MA - 8 March 1794

    I have been only two davs (when I was too sick to attend) absent from the sick bed of your grandmother. Your desire, that her last days might be rendered as comfortable as it is possible to make them, has been fulfilled.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Abigail Smith.

    Quincy, MA - 10 March 1794

    I think our ladies ought to be cautious of foreigners. I am almost led to suspect a spy in every strange character. It is much too easy a matter for a man, if he has property, to get introduced into company in this country

  • Abigail Adams letter to John Adams.

    Quincy, MA - 8 February 1797

    And may it prove an auspicious prelude to each ensuing season. You have this day to declare yourself head of a nation.

  • Abigail Adams letter to John Adams.

    Quincy, MA - 26 April 1797

    The funeral rites performed, I prepare to set out on the morrow. I long to leave a place, where every scene and object wears a gloom, or looks so to me. My agitated mind wants repose.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Thomas Adams.

    Quincy, MA - 8 November 1797

    I have much upon my mind which I could say to you ; prudence forbids my committing it to writing.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Thomas Adams.

    Washington, MD - 13 November 1800

    Well, my dear son, South Carolina has behaved as your father always said she would. The consequence to us, personally, is, that we retire from public life.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Abigail Smith.

    Washington, MD - 21 November 1800

    You must keep all this to yourself, and, when asked how I like it, say that I write you the situation is beautiful, which is true. The house is made habitable, but there is not a single apartment finished

  • Abigail Adams letter to John Quincy Adams.

    Washington, MD - 27 November 1800

    Two articles we are much distressed for ; the one is bells, but the more important one is wood. Yet you cannot see wood for trees. No arrangement has been made, but by promises never performed, to supply the newcomers with fuel.

  • Abigail Adams letter to William Smith.

    Quincy, MA - 3 May 1801

    I have to acknowledge the receipt of the raspberry bushes, and the pot of strawberry vines, for which accept my thanks. I have had them placed in a good part of the garden

  • Abigail Adams letter to Thomas Adams.

    Quincy, MA - 12 July 1801

    You will find your father in his fields, attending to his hay-makers, and your mother busily occupied in the domestic concerns of her family.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Quincy, MA - 20 May 1804

    Had you been no other than the private inhabitant of Monticello, I should, ere this time, have addressed you with that sympathy which a recent event has awakened in my bosom ; but reasons of various kinds withheld my pen

  • Abigail Adams letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Quincy, MA - 1 July 1804

    But you have been pleased to enter upon some subjects which call for a reply ; and as you observe that you have wished for an opportunity to express your sentiments, I have given them every weight they claim.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Quincy, MA - 18 August 1804

    Your statement inspecting Callender, and your motives for liberating him wear a different aspect as explained by you, from the impression which the act had made

  • Abigail Adams letter to Thomas Jefferson.

    Quincy, MA - 25 October 1804

    It was not until circumstances concurred to place you in the light of a rewarder and encourager of a libeller, whom you could not but detest and despise, that I withdrew the esteem I had long entertained for you.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Packard.

    Quincy, MA - 11 March 1805

    Scarcely had the grave closed over the remains of my esteemed friend Madam Sargent, relict of the late Judge, ere it was again opened to receive those of one still dearer to me.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Elizabeth Shaw.

    Quincy, MA - 5 June 1809

    It is said, if riches increase, those increase that eat them ; but what shall we say, when the eaters increase without the wealth ?

  • Abigail Adams letter to Caroline Smith.

    Quincy, MA - 26 February 1811

    I have some troubles in the loss of friends by death, and no small solicitude for the motherless offspring, but my trust and confidence are in that being who "hears the young ravens when they cry."

  • Abigail Adams letter to Caroline Smith.

    Quincy, MA - 19 November 1812

    Your neat, pretty letter, looking small, but containing much, reached me this day. I have a good mind to give you the journal of the day.

  • Abigail Adams letter to F Vanderkemp.

    Quincy, MA - 3 February 1814

    I agree with Mr. Vanderkemp, that, in declaring his opinion, he has expressed that of most gentlemen, the true cause of which I shall trace no farther than that they consider a companion more desirable than a rival.

  • Abigail Adams letter to Elizabeth Shaw.

    Quincy, MA - 30 December 1814

    With Mr. Gerry died one of the first and oldest patriots of the revolution a firm steady and unshaken friend of more than fifty years ripening. "Such friends grow not thick on every bough."

  • Abigail Adams letter to Dexter.

    Quincy, MA - 12 May 1816

    How can I address you, or offer human consolation for a wound which must bleed afresh at every attempt to assuage it?