Letters written to Abigail Adams during the years 1774 thru 1801

Abigail Adams

308 Letters written to Abigail Adams from 2 author(s) including John Adams from places such as Boston, MA, New York, NY and Falmouth, MA. Who did Abigail Adams know?

Filters

  • sponsored contentJohn Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 July 1776

    I was informed, a day or two before the receipt of your letter, that you was gone to Plymouth, by Mrs. Polly Palmer, who was obliging enough, in your absence, to send me the particulars of the expedition to the lower harbor against the men of war.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Boston, MA - 12 May 1774

    I AM extremely afflicted with the relation your father gave me of the return of your disorder. I fear you have taken some cold.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    New York, NY - 29 June 1774

    I HAVE a great deal of leisure, which I chiefly employ in scribbling, that my mind may not stand still or run back, like my fortune.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Falmouth, MA - 6 July 1774

    MOBS are the trite topic of declamation and invective among all the ministerial people far and near. They are grown universally learned in the nature, tendency and consequences of them, and very elegant and pathetic in descanting upon them.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Falmouth, MA - 7 July 1774

    I am engaged in a famous cause. The cause of King of Scarborough versus a mob that broke into his house and rifled his papers and terrified him, his wife, children and servants in the night.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Falmouth, MA - 9 July 1774

    I NEVER enjoyed better health in any of my journeys,but this has been the most tedious, the most irk some, the most gloomy and melancholy I ever made. I cannot, with all my philosophy and Christian resignation, keep up my spirits.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Princeton, NJ - 28 August 1774

    The education of our children is never out of my mind. Train them to virtue. Habituate them to industry, activity and spirit. Make them consider every vice as shameful and unmanly.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 September 1774

    We have received a confused account from Boston of a dreadful catastrophe. The particulars we have not heard. We are waiting with the utmost anxiety and impatience, for further intelligence.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 September 1774

    A Tory here is the most despicable animal in the creation. Spiders, toads, snakes are their only proper emblems.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 September 1774

    we were so divided in religious sentiments ; some Episcopalians, some Quakers, some Anabaptists, some Presbyterians, and some Congregationalists, that we could not join in the same act of worship.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 September 1774

    The proceedings of the Congress are all a profound secret as yet, except two votes which were passed yesterday, and ordered to be printed. You will see them from every quarter.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 September 1774

    When the horrid news was brought here of the bombardment of Boston, which made us completely miserable for two days, we saw proofs both of the sympathy and the resolution of the continent. War! war! war! was the cry

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 September 1774

    I am anxious to know how you can live without government But the experiment must be tried. The evils will not be found so dreadful as you apprehend them.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 September 1774

    Fifty gentlemen meeting together, all strangers, are not acquainted with each other's language, ideas, views, designs.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 September 1774

    Patience, forbearance, long suffering are the lessons taught here for our province, and at the same time, absolute and open resistance to the new Government.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 October 1774

    I wish I could write to you a dozen letters every day. But the business before me is so arduous, and takes up my time so entirely, that I cannot write often.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 October 1774

    This assembly is like no other that ever existed. Every man in it is a great roan, an orator, a critic, a statesman ; and therefore, every man upon every question, must show his oratory, his criticism, and his political abilities.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hartford, CT - 30 April 1775

    The people of the city have seized the city arms and ammunition out of the hands of the Mayor, who is a creature of the Governor. Lord North will certainly be disappointed in his expectation of seducing New York.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hartford, CT - 2 May 1775

    OUR hearts arc bleeding for the poor people of Boston. What will or can be done for them, I can't conceive. God preserve them.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hartford, CT - 2 May 1775

    It is arrogance and presumption, in human sagacity, to pretend to penetrate far into the designs of Heaven.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 May 1775

    The Congress will support the Massachusetts. There is a good spirit here. But we have an amazing field of business before us. When I shall have the joy of meeting you and our little ones, I know not.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 June 1775

    I wish I could write freely to you, my dear, but I cannot. The scene before me is complicated enough. It requires better eyes, and better nerves than mine ; yet I will not despond.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 June 1775

    DR. CHURCH has given me a lotion which has helped my eyes so much that I hope you will hear from me oftener than you have done.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 June 1775

    I can now inform you, that the Congress have made choice of the modest and virtuous, the amiable, generous and brave George Washington, Esquire, to be General of the American army

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 June 1775

    THIS letter, I presume, will go by the brave and amiable General Washington. Our army will have a group of officers equal to any service.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 June 1775

    I HAVE this morning been out of town, to accompany our Generals, Washington, Lee and Schuyler, a little way on their journey to the American camp, before Boston.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 July 1775

    It is not at all surprising to me, that the wanton, cruel, and infamous conflagration of Charlestown, the place of your father's nativity, should afllict him. Let him know that I sincerely condole with him on that melancholy event.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 July 1775

    Dr. Franklin has Been very constant in his attendance on Congress from the beginning. His conduct has been composed and grave, and, in the opinion of many gentlemen, very reserved.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 July 1775

    We have nothing new, but the arrival of some powder. Three little vessels have certainly arrived, making about ten tons in the whole, and four or five tons have arrived from South Carolina.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 October 1775

    I feel, I tremble for you. Poor Tommy ! I hope, by this time, however, he has recovered his plump cheeks, and his fine tyloom.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 October 1775

    I must beg to be excused, my dear, from hinting at anything for the future, of public persons or things. Secrecy is so much exacted. But thus much I may say, that I never saw so serious and determined a spirit.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 October 1775

    The situation of things is so alarming, that it is our duty to prepare our minds and hearts for every event even the worst From my earliest entrance into life, I have been engaged in the public cause of America

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 October 1775

    Pray, bundle up every paper, not already hid, and conceal them in impenetrable darkness. Nobody knows what may occur.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 October 1775

    It is the constitution under which we are born, that if we live long ourselves, we must bury our parents, and all our elder relations, and many of those who are younger.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 October 1775

    Really it is very painful to be four hundred miles from one's family and friends, when we know they are in affliction. It seems as if it would be a joy to me to fly home, even to share with you your burdens and misfortunes.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 October 1775

    If I could write as well as you, my sorrow would be as eloquent as yours, but, upon my word, I cannot.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 October 1775

    Does not natural morality and much more Christian benevolence make it our indispensable duty to lay ourselves out to serve our fellow Creatures, to the utmost, of our power, in promoting and supporting those great political systems and general regula

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 October 1775

    Education makes a greater difference between man and man, than nature has made between man and brute. The virtues and powers to which men may be trained, by early education and constant discipline, are truly sublime and astonishing.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 October 1775

    New England has, in many respects, the advantage of every other colony in America, and, indeed, of every other part of the world that I know any thing of.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 November 1775

    This town is as secure from the cannon and men of war as the moon is. I wish she had a little of your fortitude. I had rather be killed by a ball than live in such continual fears as she does.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 December 1775

    although I have a number of friends and many relations, who are very dear to me, yet all the friendship I have for others is far unequal to that which warms my heart for you.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Watertown, NY - 24 January 1776

    I dined at Colonel Mifllin's with the General and lady, and a vast collection of other company, among whom were six or seven sachems and warriors of the French Caghnawaga Indians with several of their wives and children.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 0 February 1776

    LEE is at York, and we have requested a battalion of Philadelphia associators, together with a regiment of Jersey minute men, to march to his assistance.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 February 1776

    There is a deep anxiety, a kind of thoughtful melancholy, and in some, a lowness of spirits approaching to despondency, prevailing through the southern colonies, at present, very similar to what I have often observed in Boston

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 February 1776

    I SENT you from New York a pamphlet intitled "Common Sense," written in vindication of doctrines, which there is reason to expect, that the further encroachments of tyranny and depredations of oppression will soon make the common faith

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 March 1776

    Your vicinity to such scenes of carnage and desolation as, I fear, are now to be seen in Boston and its environs, will throw you into much distress, but I believe in my conscience, I feel more here than you do.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 March 1776

    I am much pleased with your caution in your letter, in avoiding names both of persons and places, or any other circumstances, which might designate to strangers the writer, or the person written to, or the persons mentioned.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 March 1776

    I GIVE you joy of Boston and Charlestown, once more the habitation of Americans.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 April 1776

    You will see by the papers the news, the speculations, and the political plans of the day. The ports are opened wide enough at last, and privateers are allowed to prey upon British trade.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 April 1776

    As to your extraordinary code of laws, I cannot but laugh... Depend upon it, we know better than to repeal our masculine systems. Although they are in full force, you know they are little more than theory.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 April 1776

    I SEND you every newspaper that comes out, and I send you, now and then, a few sheets of paper, but this article is as scarce here, as with you. I would send a quire, if I could get a conveyance.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 April 1776

    This curious character of a barber, I have a great inclination to draw, for your amusement. He is a little dapper fellow, short and small, but active and lively. A tongue as fluent and voluble as you please

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 28 April 1776

    Instead of domestic felicity, I am destined to public contentions. Instead of rural felicity, I must reconcile myself to the smoke and noise of a city. In the place of private peace, I must be distracted with the vexation of developing the deep intri

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 May 1776

    What shall I do with my office ? I want to resign it for a thousand reasons. Would you advise me ?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 May 1776

    I HAVE this morning heard Mr. Duffield, upon the signs of the times. He ran a parallel between the case of Israel, and that of America ; and between the conduct of Pharaoh, and that of George.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 May 1776

    Generals Gates and Mifflin are now here: General Washington will be here to-morrow, when we shall consult and deliberate concerning the operations of the ensuing campaign.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 May 1776

    I think you shine as a stateswoman of late, as well as a farmeress. Pray where do you get your maxims of state ? They are very apropos.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 June 1776

    YESTERDAY I dined with Captain Richards, the gentle man who made me the present of the brass pistols. We had cherries, strawberries and green peas in plenty.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 June 1776

    I wish our uncle had as much ambition, as he has virtue and ability. A deficiency of ambition is as criminal and injurious as an excess of it. Tell him I say so.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 June 1776

    Our misfortunes in Canada are enough to melt a heart of stone. The small pox is ten times more terrible than Britons, Canadians and Indians, together. This was the cause of our precipitate retreat from Quebec.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 July 1776

    HAD a Declaration of Independency been made seven months ago, it would have been attended with many great and glorious effects. We might, before this hour, have formed alliances with foreign states.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 July 1776

    The design of our enemy now seems to be, a powerful invasion of New York and New Jersey. The Halifax fleet and army is arrived, and another fleet and army under Lord Howe is expected to join them.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 July 1776

    Letters, like conversation, should be free, easy, and familiar. Simplicity and familiarity are the characteristics of this kind of writing. Affectation is as disagreeable in a letter, as in conversation

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 July 1776

    You will sec, by the newspapers, which I, from time to time, enclose, with what rapidity the colonies proceed in their political manoeuvres. How many calamities might have been avoided, if these measures had been taken twelve months ago

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 July 1776

    The militia of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and the lower counties are marching with much alacrity, and a laudable zeal to take care of Howe and his army at Staten Island.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 July 1776

    There is a most amiable, laudable and gallant spirit prevailing in these middle colonies. The militia turn out in great numbers, and in high spirits, in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware, so that we hope to resist Howe and his myrmidons

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 July 1776

    We had yesterday an express from General Lee in Charleston, South Carolina, with an account of a brilliant little action between the armament under Clinton and Cornwallis, and a battery on Sullivan's Island

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 July 1776

    If you were too busy to write, I hoped that some kind hand would have been found to let me know something about you. Do my friends think that I have been a politician so long, as to have lost all feeling?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 July 1776

    How are you all this morning ? Sick, weak, faint, in pain, or pretty well recovered ? By this time, you are well acquainted with the small pox. Pray, how do you like it ?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 August 1776

    Went this morning to the Baptist meeting, in hopes of hearing Mr. Stillman, but was disappointed. He was there, but another gentleman preached.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 August 1776

    A French vessel, a pretty large brigantine, deeply laden, arrived here yesterday, from Martinique. She had fifty barrels of limes, which are all sold, already, at such prices, that the amount of them will be sufficient to load the brig with flour.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 August 1776

    I want to be informed of the state of things with you ; whether there is a scarcity of provisions of any kind, of West India articles, of clothing ? Whether any trade is carried on, any fishery ?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 August 1776

    THIS is the anniversary of a memorable day in the history of America. A day when the principle of American resistance and independence was first asserted and carried into action. The stamp office fell before the rising spirit of our countrymen.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 August 1776

    I have seen in this world but a little of that pure flame of patriotism which certainly burns in some breasts. There is much of the ostentation and affectation of it. I have known a few, who could not bear to entertain a selfish design

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 August 1776

    YESTERDAY morning, I took a walk into Arch street to see Mr. Peale's Painter's room. Peale is from Maryland, a tender, soft, affectionate creature.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 August 1776

    Another winter, will do much for us too. We shall have more and better soldiers. We shall be better armed. We shall have a greater force at sea. We shall have more trade. Our artillery will be greatly increased, our officers will have more experience

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 September 1776

    But it is uncertain when I shall set off for home. I will not go at present Affairs are too delicate and critical. The panic may seize I whom it will. It shall not seize me. I will stay here until the public countenance is better, or much worse.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 September 1776

    THIS day, I think, has been the most remarkable of all. Sullivan came here from Lord Howe, five days ago,with a message, that his lordship desired a half an hour's conversation with some of the members of Congress in their private capacities.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 September 1776

    YESTERDAY morning, I returned with Dr. Franklin and Mr. Rutledge from Staten Island, where we met Lord Howe, and had about three hours conversation with him.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 September 1776

    WE have at last agreed upon a plan for forming a regular army. We have offered twenty dollars and a hundred acres of land to every man who will enlist during the war.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 October 1776

    I will not say, that I expect to run distracted, to grow melancholy, to drop in an apoplexy or fall into a consumption ; but I do say, it is little less than a miracle, that one or other of these misfortunes has not befallen me before now.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 October 1776

    I AM seated in a large library room with eight gentlemen round about me, all engaged in conversation. Amidst these interruptions, how shall I make it out to write a letter ?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 October 1776

    I assure you, we are as much at a loss, about affairs at New York, as you are. In general, our Generals were outgeneraled on Long Island, and Sullivan and Stirling with a thousand men were made prisoners

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 October 1776

    But I am coming to make my apology in person. I yesterday, asked and obtained leave of absence.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Fishkill, NY -

    AFTER a march like that of Hannibal over the Alps, we arrived, last night, at this place, where we found the utmost difficulty to get forage for our horses, and lodgings for ourselves

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Dedham, MA - 9 January 1777

    Present my affection in the tenderest manner to my little deserving daughter and my amiable sons. It was cruel parting this morning. My heart was most deeply affected although I had the presence of mind to appear composed.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hartford, CT - 13 January 1777

    Our spirits have been cheered by two or three pieces of good news, which Commissary Trumbull, who is now with me, tells us he saw yesterday, in a letter from General Washington, who has gained another considerable advantage of the enemy at Stony Broo

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hartford, CT - 14 January 1777

    IT is now generally believed that General Washington has killed and taken at least two thousand of Mr. Howe's army since Christmas. Indeed the evidence of it is from the General's own letters.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 19 January 1777

    This, as well as Fishkill, is a pretty village. We are almost wholly among the Dutch. Zealous against the Tories, who have not half the tranquillity here, that they have in the town of Boston

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Bethlehem, NY - 20 January 1777

    General Washington, with his little army, is at Morristown. Cornwallis, with his larger one, at Brunswick. Oh ! that the continental army was full. Now is the time!

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Eaton, PA - 24 January 1777

    WE have at last crossed the Delaware and are agree ably lodged at Easton, a little town situated on a point of land formed by the Delaware on one side, and the river Lehigh on the other.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Baltimore, MD - 2 February 1777

    Baltimore is a very pretty town, situated on Patapsco river, which empties itself into the great bay of Chesapeake. The inhabitants are all good Whigs, having some time ago banished all the Tories from among them.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Baltimore, MD - 3 February 1777

    I shall take opportunities to describe this town and State more particularly to you hereafter. I shall inquire into their religion, their laws, their customs, their manners, their descent and education, their learning, their schools and colleges, and

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Baltimore, MD - 7 February 1777

    I AM at last, after a great deal of difficulty, settled in comfortable quarters, but at an infinite expense.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Baltimore, MD - 7 February 1777

    I THINK, in some letter I sent you since I left Bethlehem, I promised you a more particular account of that curious and remarkable town.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Baltimore, MD - 10 February 1777

    FELL's point, which I mentioned in a letter this morn ing, has a considerable number of houses upon it. The shipping all lies now at this point.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Baltimore, MD - 15 February 1777

    We have from New Hampshire a Colonel Thornton, a physician by profession, a man of humor. He has a large budget of droll stories with which he entertains company perpetually.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Baltimore, MD - 17 February 1777

    Howe, as you know my opinion always was, will repent his mad march through the Jerseys. The people of that Commonwealth begin to raise their spirits exceedingly and to be firmer than ever.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Baltimore, MD - 21 February 1777

    Many persons are extremely dissatisfied with numbers of the generaf officers of the highest rank. I Don't mean the Commander-in-chief, his character is justly very high

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 March 1777

    This city is a dull place, in comparison of what it was. More than one half of the inhabitants have removed into the country, as it was their wisdom to do.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 March 1777

    What pleasure has not this vile war deprived me of? I want to wander in my meadows, to ramble over my mountains, and to sit, in solitude, or with her who has all my heart, by the side of the brooks.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 March 1777

    " A PLOT, a plot ! a horrid plot ! Mr. A.," says my barber, this morning.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 March 1777

    Accidents have thrown so many letters into the hands of the enemy, and they take such a malicious pleasure in exposing them, that I choose they should have nothing but trifles from me to expose.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 April 1777

    You think I dont t write politics enough. Indeed I have a surfeit of them. But I shall give you now and then a taste, since you have such a gout for them.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 April 1777

    As you seem so inquisitive about politics, I will indulge you so far (indulge. I say. Observe that word, indulge ! I suppose you will say, it ought to have been, oblige,)

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 April 1777

    You have had many rumors propagated among you which I suppose you know not how to account for. One was, that Congress, the last summer, had tied the hands of General Washington, and would not let him fight, particularly on the White plains.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 April 1777

    Lee fares as well as a man in close prison can fare, I suppose, constantly guarded and watched. I fancy Howe will engage that he shall be treated as a prisoner of war, and in that case we shall all be easy.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 April 1777

    ENCLOSED with this, you have a correspondence between the two Generals concerning the cartel for the exchange of prisoners. Washington is in the right, and has maintained his argument with a delicacy and dignity, which do him much honor

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 April 1777

    The graves of the soldiers, who have been buried in this ground from the hospital and bettering house during the course of the last summer, fall and winter, dead of the smallpox and camp diseases, are enough to make the heart of stone to melt away.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 April 1777

    WE have now an ample representation from New York. It consists of six delegates, and they are to all appearance as high, as decisive, and as determined as any men ever were or can be.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 April 1777

    MY barber just left the chamber. The following curious dialogue was the amusement during the gay moments of shaving.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 April 1777

    THERE is a clock calm at this time in the political and military hemispheres. The surface is smooth and the air serene. Not a breath nor a wave, no news nor noise.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 April 1777

    Posterity! you will never know how much it cost the present generation to preserve your freedom! I hope you will make a good use of it If you do not, I shall repent in Heaven that I ever took half the pains to preserve it.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 April 1777

    My barber, whom I quote as often as ever I did any authority, says, "he has read histories of cruelty and he has read romances of cruelty, but the cruelty of the British exceeds all that he ever read."

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 May 1777

    ENCLOSED with this you will have an Evening Post containing some of the tender mercies of the barbarians to their prisoners.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 May 1777

    Some merchant ships are arrived this week from Mary land. They were first chased by men of war in attempting to get into Chesapeake Bay.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 May 1777

    THE day before yesterday, I took a walk with my friend Whipple to Mrs. Wells's, the sister of the famous Mrs. Wright, to see her wax-work.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 May 1777

    In the midst of infinite noise, hurry and bustle, I lead & lonely, melancholy life, mourning the loss of all the charms of life, which are my family, and all the amusements that I ever had in life, which is my farm.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 May 1777

    O ! that I could wander upon Perm's hill and in the meadows and mountains in its neighborhood, free from care ! But this is a felicity too great for me.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 May 1777

    I would give three guineas for a barrel of your cider. Not one drop is to be had here for gold, and wine is not to be had under six or eight dollars a gallon, and that very bad.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 May 1777

    I am ashamed of our farmers. They are a lazy, ignorant set ; in husbandry, I mean ; for they know infinitely more of every thing else than these.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 June 1777

    Revenge in ancient days, (you will see it through the whole Roman History) was esteemed a generous and an heroic passion. Nothing was too good for a friend, or too bad for an enemy.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 June 1777

    You will see, by the enclosed papers in a letter from my friend Parsons, a very handsome narration of one of the prettiest exploits of this war, a fine retaliation of the Danbury mischief.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 July 1777

    Next month completes three years that I have been devoted to the service of liberty. A slavery it has been to me, whatever the world may think of it.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 July 1777

    We have had no news from camp for three or four days. Mr. Howe, by the last advices, was manoeuvring his fleet arid army in such a manner as give us expectations of an expedition

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 July 1777

    WE have a confused account from the northward of something unlucky at Ticonderoga, but cannot certainly tell what it is. I am much afraid we shall lose that post, as we did forts Washington and Lee

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 August 1777

    An express from Sinnepuxent, a place between the Capes of Delaware and the Capes of Chesapeake, informs, that a fleet of one hundred sail was seen off that place last Thursday.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 August 1777

    THINK I have sometimes observed to you in conversation, that upon examining the biography of illustrious men, you will generally find some female about them, in the relation of mother, or wife, or sister, to whose instigation a great part of their me

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 August 1777

    I am sorry that you and the people of Boston were put to so much trouble, but glad to hear that such numbers determined to fly. The prices for carting which were demanded were detestable.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 August 1777

    Howe's fleet and army is still incognito. The gentlemen from South Carolina begin to tremble for Charleston. If Howe is under a judicial blindness, he may be gone there.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 August 1777

    I feel an inclination sometimes to write the history of the last three years, in imitation of Thucydides. There is a striking resemblance in several particulars between the Peloponnesian and the American war.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 August 1777

    They had been seen from the eastern shore of Virginia, standing off and on, for two days before. This method of coasting along the shore, and standing off and on, is very curious.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 August 1777

    IT is now no longer a secret where Mr. Howe's fleet is. We have authentic intelligence that it is arrived at the head of Chesapeake bay, above the river Patapsco, upon which the town of Baltimore stands.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 August 1777

    I think there is a reasonable ground for confidence, with the favor of Heaven, that Howe will not be able to reach this city.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 August 1777

    The lightning struck in several places. It struck the Quaker alms-house in Walnut street, between Third and Fourth streets, not far from Captain Duncan's, where I lodge.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 August 1777

    A letter from Chesapeake bay, dated yesterday morning, informs that the enemy had not then landed.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 August 1777

    HOWE's army, at least about five thousand of them, besides his light horse, are landed upon the banks of the Elk river, and the disposition he has made of his forces indicates a design to rest and refresh both men and horses.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 August 1777

    General Washington, with a very numerous army, is between Wilmington and the Head of Elk. Howe will make but a pitiful figure.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 August 1777

    The enemy are in possession of the Head of Elk, a little town at the head of the river Elk, in which they found a quantity of corn and oats belonging to the States.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 September 1777

    A letter from General Washington, dated Saturday, informs that our light parties have brought in four-and- twenty prisoners more. So that the prisoners and deserters since Mr. Howe landed are near a hundred.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 September 1777

    There is but one course for us to take, and that is to renounce the use of all foreign commodities. For my own part, I never lived in my whole life so meanly and poorly as I do now, and yet my constituents will growl at my extravagance.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 September 1777

    THERE has been a very general apprehension during the last week, that a general action would happen as on yesterday, but we hear of none.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 September 1777

    Mr. Howe's army is at Chester, about fifteen miles from this town. General Washington's is over the Schuylkill, awaiting the flank of Mr. Howe's army.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Yorktown, PA - 30 September 1777

    the Congress were alarmed in their beds by a letter from Mr. Hamilton, one of General Washington's family, that the enemy was in possession of the ford over the Schuylkill

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Yorktown, PA - 7 October 1777

    One thing is now becoming more and more certain every day, that is, that our people will and do fight. And although they make a clumsy hand of it, yet they do better and better.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Yorktown, PA - 15 October 1777

    Government and law in the States, large taxation, and strict discipline in our armies, are the only things wanting as human means.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Yorktown, PA - 24 October 1777

    News I am afraid to write, be cause I never know, until it is too late, what is true.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Yorktown, PA - 25 October 1777

    As to news we are yet in a painful suspense about affairs at the northward, but from Philadelphia, we have accounts that are very pleasing.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Yorktown, PA - 26 October 1777

    The forts at Province Island and Redbank have been defended with a magnanimity which will give our country a reputation in Europe.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Yorktown, PA - 28 October 1777

    WE have been three days soaking and poaching in the heaviest rain that has been known for several years

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Portsmouth, NH - 15 December 1777

    I have had many opportunities, in the course of this journey, to observe how deeply rooted our righteous cause is in the minds of the people ; and could write you many anecdotes in proof of it.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 25 April 1778

    If human nature could be made happy by anything that can please the eye, the ear, the taste, or any other sense, or passion, or fancy, this country would be the region for happiness.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 3 June 1778

    It would be endless to attempt a description of this country. It is one great garden. Nature and art have conspired to render every thing here delightful.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 16 June 1778

    We long to hear from America the ratification of the treaty with France, the captivity of General Clinton's army, and of Lord Howe's fleet.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 23 September 1778

    A VERY idle, vain conversation at a dinner has produced you this letter from a venerable old lady in this neighborhood, the wife of Monsieur Grand the banker.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 6 November 1778

    My anxiety for you and for the public is not diminished by time or distance. The great number of accidental disappointments in the course of the last summer are afflicting.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 27 November 1778

    Europe is the dullest place in the world. No news but the lies which the emissaries of England are making and spreading in every part.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 2 December 1778

    Draw for more as you may have occasion. But make them give you gold and silver for your bills.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 18 December 1778

    I have written several answers ; but upon a review, they appeared to be such as I could not send. One was angry, another was full of grief, and the third with melancholy, so that I burnt them all.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 27 December 1778

    Last night I walked to Paris and saw the illumination for the birth of the princess Maria Theresa Charlotte, Fille du Roi. Splendid indeed !

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 30 December 1778

    WE wait, and wait, and wait forever, without any news from America. We get nothing but what comes from England and to other people here, and they make it as they please.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 1 January 1779

    I WISH you a happy new year and many happy years, and all the blessings of life. Who knows but this year may be more prosperous for our country than any we have seen ?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 9 February 1779

    The character and situation in which I am here, and the situation of public affairs absolutely forbid my writing freely. I must be excused.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 13 February 1779

    I have received intelligence much more agreeable than that of a removal to Holland ; I mean that of being reduced to a private citizen, which gives me more pleasure than you can imagine.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 20 February 1779

    It would be an easy thing for me to ruin you and your children by an indiscreet letter, and what is more, it would be easy to throw our country into convulsions. For God's sake never reproach me again with not writing or with writing scrips.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 20 February 1779

    A NEW commission has arrived by which the Dr. is sole minister. Mr. Lee continues commissioner for Spain, but I am reduced to the condition of a private citizen.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 21 February 1779

    The expense of my son here is greater than I ever imagined. Although his company is almost all the pleasure I have in life, yet I should not have brought him if I had known the expense.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Passy, FRA - 27 February 1779

    I went to Saint Denis, a little village about eight miles from this place, where are the tombs of all the kings and queens. The statues of all lie in state in marble.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Orient, FRA - 14 May 1779

    By the gracious invitation of the King, I am now to take passage in his frigate, the Sensible, with his new Ambassador to America, the Chevalier de la Luzerne.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Boston, MA - 13 November 1779

    It is proposed to sail tomorrow ; perhaps, however, it may not be till next day.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Ferrol, ESP - 11 December 1779

    As the frigate will probably not get from this place these two months, I must go by land to Paris, which I suppose is a journey of between three and four hundred leagues.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Ferrol, ESP - 12 December 1779

    THE French consul had agreed to carry me, Mr. Dana, Mr. Allen, and my three children and our three servants, this day to Corunna, which is about five leagues from this place, by water

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Corunna, ESP - 16 December 1779

    The distance is about twenty miles by land, over high mountains and bad roads. You would have been diverted to have seen us all mounted upon our mules and marching in train.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    unknown -

    Since my arrival this time, I have driven about Paris more than I did before. The rural scenes around this town are charming. The public walks, gardens, &c., are extremely beautiful.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    unknown -

    YESTERDAY we went to see the garden of the King, Jardin du Roi, and his cabinet of natural history, cabinet d histoire naturelle. The cabinet of natural history is a great collection of metals, minerals, shells, insects, birds, beasts, fishes and pre

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Bilboa, ESP - 16 January 1780

    WE arrived here last night, all alive, but all very near sick with violent colds taken on the road for want of comfortable accommodations.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 16 February 1780

    The English bounce a great deal about obtaining seven thousand troops from the petty German princes and ten thousand from Ireland to send to America, but this is only a repetition of their annual gasconade.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 23 February 1780

    THE children made me a visit to-day, and went with me to dine with my old friends, the two Abbes, whom you have often heard me mention, Chalut and Arnoux

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 17 June 1780

    I YESTERDAY received a letter of the 26th of April from brother Cranch, for which I thank him and will answer as soon as possible. He tells me you have drawn a little bill upon me.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Amsterdam, NED - 15 September 1780

    I have sent you some things by Captain Davis, but he has no arms and I fear they will be lost by capture. I sent things by the Alliance.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Amsterdam, NED - 18 December 1780

    I HAVE this morning sent Mr. Thaxter with my two sons to Leyden, there to take up their residence for some time, and there to pursue their studies of Latin and Greek under the excellent masters, and there to attend lectures of the celebrated professo

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Amsterdam, NED - 2 December 1781

    I avoided saying any thing about Charles to save you the anxiety, which I fear you will now feel in its greatest severity, a long time. I thought he would go directly home in a short passage

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Amsterdam, NED - 18 December 1781

    The King of England consoles his people under all their dis graces, disasters and dismal prospects, by telling them that they are brave and free. It is a pity for him that he did not allow the Americans to be so seven years ago.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hague, NED - 25 July 1782

    IN this country, as in all others, men are much addicted to "hobby horses" These nags are called in the language of the Dutch "Liefhebbery" as they are called in French "Marotte" I had rather ride a Dutch hobby horse than an English one, or a French.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hague, NED - 31 August 1782

    how much more luxurious it would be to me to d ne upon roast beef with Parson Smith, Dr. Tufts, or Norton Quincy ! or upon rusticoat potatoes with Portia! Ah ! Oh ! hi, ho, hum, and her daughter and sons !

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hague, NED - 17 September 1782

    It is now five months since my public reception here, but we have not yet learned that any news of it has arrived in America.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 4 December 1782

    YOUR proposal of coming to Europe has long and tenderly affected me. The dangers and inconveniences are such, and a European life would be so dis agreeable to you, that I have suffered a great deal of anxiety in reflecting upon it.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 28 December 1782

    I DARE say there is not a lady in America treated with a more curious dish of politics than is contained in the enclosed papers.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 18 February 1783

    I have written to Congress a resignation, but I foresee there will not be a speedy decision upon it, and I shall be left in a state of suspense that will be intolerable.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 27 February 1783

    No. Let us live in our own country, and in our own way, educate our children to be good for some thing. Upon no consideration whatever would I have any of my children educated in Europe.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 8 April 1783

    WHAT would I not give for an arrival from America, or for certain advice from London of the appointment of a ministry, or for the arrival here of a minister to sign the definitive treaty ?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 30 May 1783

    HERE I am out of all patience. Not a word from America. The British ministry lingering on. Mr. Hartley uncertain what to do. No regulation of commerce agreed on. No definitive treaty of peace signed

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 19 June 1783

    I know not whether my resignation is accepted, and consequently can give you no conjecture when I shall be able to get away.

  • letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hague, NED - 23 July 1783

    John Quincy Adams letter to mother... I stayed at Stockholm about six weeks, and was much pleased with the polite manner in which the people of the country treat strangers.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 7 September 1783

    Mr. Laurens has leave to go home, and Mr. Dana is gone, so that there remain in service only Mr. Franklin, Mr. Jay, and myself. In these circumstances I must stay another winter.

  • letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 10 September 1783

    John Quincy Adams letter to mother... As you have ordered me in a letter ... to give you my observations on the countries thro which I have travelled, the following are some upon Russia

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Paris, FRA - 10 September 1783

    WE have received from Congress a resolution by which we are to be empowered to negotiate a treaty of commerce with Great Britain, myself, Mr. Franklin and Mr. Jay.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    London, ENG - 8 November 1783

    I HAVE this day, by special permission from their majesties, obtained by Mr. West, the painter, who with Mr. Copley does so much honor to our country, seen the apartments in the Queen's house

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hague, NED - 26 July 1784

    YOUR letter of the 23d Has made me the happiest man upon earth. I am twenty years younger than I was yesterday. It is a cruel mortification to me that I cannot go to meet you in London

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    London, ENG - 25 December 1786

    An old man, you see, may comfort himself with such a virgin as much as David did with Abishag, and not give the least jealousy even to his wife, the smallest grief to his children, or any scandal to the world.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    London, ENG - 27 December 1786

    The news from Boston is very well. The court has set at Cambridge in great pomp, guarded by three thousand men and a train of artillery.

  • letter to Abigail Adams.

    Cambridge, ENG - 30 December 1786

    John Quincy Adams letter to mother... As for public affairs I have a great aversion even to thinking of them

  • letter to Abigail Adams.

    Newburyport, MA - 23 December 1787

    John Quincy Adams letter to mother... In the beginning of September I came to this town, and began the study of the law with Mr. Parsons.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Amsterdam, NED - 11 March 1788

    I hope you will have every thing ready, that by the twenty-first or second of March, we may set off together for Falmouth from London.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Amsterdam, NED - 14 March 1788

    Mr. Jefferson is so anxious to obtain money here to enable him to discharge some of the most urgent demands upon the United States, and preserve their credit from bankruptcy for two years longer

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Braintree, MA - 2 December 1788

    My love to our children, and respects and regards wherever you please. Don t be uneasy on account of your family here, nor in haste to come home before a good opportunity presents.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Rye, NY - 19 April 1789

    We arrived at this house last night (Saturday), shall rest here to-day, and go into New York to-morrow.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    New York, NY - 14 May 1789

    If you think it best, leave Thomas at college, but I pray you to come on with Charles, as soon as possible.

  • letter to Abigail Adams.

    Boston, MA - 14 August 1790

    John Quincy Adams letter to mother... The principal topic of conversation this week has been the arrival of the Columbia from an expedition which has carried her round the world.

  • letter to Abigail Adams.

    Boston, MA - 0 October 1790

    John Quincy Adams letter to mother... You will perceive by our papers that four members of our present delegation in Congress are reflected.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 January 1793

    I have the same aversion to the multiplication of banks, and the same apprehension of their pernicious tendency, as you express. But so many people live upon them that they will have their course.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 January 1793

    I have received all the votes from all the States. It is known that Georgia voted with North Carolina, Virginia and New York ; and Kentucky voted for Jefferson.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 January 1793

    I cannot say that my desire of fame increases. It has been strong in some parts of my life, but never so strong as my love of honesty.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 January 1793

    Mrs. Washington requests me to present to you her very particular regards. Many other ladies do the same.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 February 1793

    I have now to congratulate you on the arrival of your son and daughter and two grandsons, in fine health, at New York. They have done wisely to fly from the evil to come in Europe

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 February 1793

    The fermentation in Europe distresses me, lest it should take a turn which may involve us in many difficulties. Our neutrality will be a very delicate thing to maintain

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 March 1793

    I will never travel but by the stage, nor live at the seat of government but at lodgings, while they give me so despicable an allowance. Shiver my jib and start my planks if I do.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 December 1793

    The President's speech will show you an abundance of serious business which we have before us. Mr. Jefferson called on me last night, and informed me that to-day we should have the whole budget of foreign affairs

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 December 1793

    If a suitable season should occur for ploughing, our men may plough ; if not, they may leave it till spring, I like your plan very well

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 January 1794

    The news from France, so glorious for the French army, is celebrated in loud peals of festivity, and elevates the spirits of the enemies of government among us more than it ought, for it will not answer their ends.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 January 1794

    The prospects of this country are gloomy, but the situation of all Europe is calamitous beyond all former examples.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 January 1794

    KNOWING your taste for political speculations, I send you a couple of pamphlets for your amusement.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 January 1794

    I AM weary of this scene of dulness. We have done nothing and shall do nothing this session, which ought to be done, unless we should appropriate a sufficient sum of money for treating with the Algerines.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 February 1794

    So ! the tables are turned on the French faction ! and the English faction will exult, in their turn, in the prospect of the West India Islands

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 February 1794

    Our allies, our only allies, as the demi crazies pathetically call them, have completed their system by turning all their churches into Je ne seals quoi

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 February 1794

    Poor Genet, I fear, is undone. Bad as his conduct has been, I cannot but pity him. What will become of him, I know not. The name of his successor is Fauchet.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 March 1794

    I have again been unfortunate at sea. The vessel in which I shipped my grass seeds and two barrels of rye flour for you, has been run down and sunk in the river by a large ship.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 March 1794

    The Boston town meeting, as it terminated, did a service to the public. If government must be affronted or intimidated by popular clubs and partial meetings of the people, it is a pity that our cities are not all as capable as Boston of discussing gr

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 April 1794

    A violent measure has been proposed in the House, to sequester all debts due from American citizens to British subjects. Such a motion will do no honor to our country.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 April 1794

    There are so many wild projects and motions, and so many to support them, that I am become of more importance than usual, in the opinion of the soundest part of the community.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 April 1794

    The southern men have art enough to dupe northern ones to bring forward measures, that the northern part may have the odium of bringing on a war.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 April 1794

    One firebrand is scarcely quenched before another is thrown in ; and if the sound part of the community is not uncommonly active and attentive to support us, we shall be drawn off from our neutral ground and involved in incomprehensible evils.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 April 1794

    Vox populi, vox Dei, they say, and so it is, sometimes ; but it is some times the voice of Mahomet, of Caesar, of Catiline, the Pope and the Devil.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 April 1794

    SENATE has been three days in debate upon the appointment of Mr. Jay to go to London. It has this day been determined in his favor eighteen versus eight.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 May 1794

    Those whose principles are the same with mine, whose views of public good coincide with mine, say that if we keep together, we shall succeed to the end of the session as we have hitherto done, in keeping off all the most pernicious projects.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 May 1794

    WE go on as usual, Congress resolving one thing and the democratical societies resolving the contrary ; the President doing what is right, and clubs and mobs re solving it to be all wrong.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 May 1794

    THE long continuance of the session, and the uncommon heat and drought of the weather, have made this to me an unpleasant spring, and to increase my mortification, I have this week received no letter from you.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 May 1794

    I SHALL enclose with this some letters between Randolph and Hammond, which will show you how quarrelsome they are. Poor fellows !

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 May 1794

    IT is proper that I should apprize you that the President has it in contemplation to send your son to Holland, that you may recollect yourself and prepare for the event.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 November 1794

    I find that gentlemen cannot conveniently leave their plantations and professions in season to be here sooner. A fortnight has been already lost and we have no certainty of making a Senate on Monday.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 November 1794

    The Presbyterian congregation in Market street have taken down their old meeting house and erected a new one in the same place, much larger, higher, more light, airy and elegant.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 November 1794

    I pore upon my family at Quincy, my children in Europe, and my children and grandchildren in New York, till I am melancholy, and wish myself a private man.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 November 1794

    IT is a common observation of old people, that as they advance in life, time appears to run off faster, and the year grows shorter. I cannot, I am sure, say the same of the time which has passed of late.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 December 1794

    This session of Congress is the most innocent I ever knew. We have done no harm.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 December 1794

    the time seems longer to me than ever any time did in America. The business of Congress this session is dulness, flatness, and insipidity itself.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 January 1795

    I WISH you a happy new year, and a repetition of happy new years as long as time shall endure

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 January 1795

    To a heart that loves praise so well, and receives so little of it, your letter is like laudanum, which Mr. Henry the senator, says, is the Divinity itself.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 January 1795

    THE public prints announce the death of my old, esteemed friend General Roberdeau, whose virtues in heart-searching times endeared him to Philadelphia and to his country.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 February 1795

    The enclosed postscript to Dunlap will show you that the expectation of a treaty hourly to arrive, will not allow me to leave my chair till the fourth of March.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 February 1795

    This month has been all unpleasant weather, but none severe. You have had a north-east storm, I perceive, which raised the tides, but I hope, brought in a fresh and abundant supply of seaweed.

  • letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hague, NED - 25 April 1795

    John Quincy Adams letter to mother... It has not been without difficulty that the ardour of the popular Societies has been suppressed...

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 June 1795

    THE Senate assembled yesterday at eleven, twenty- five members present. The new senators were sworn, and a committee waited on the President

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 June 1795

    THE Senate are now in possession of the budget. It is a bone to gnaw for the aristocrats as well as the democrats

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 June 1795

    Moderation, however, is approved only by the moderate, who are commonly but a few. The many commonly delight in some thing more piquant and lively.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 June 1795

    I went out to him and found that he wanted to enquire of me concerning a young lady of amiable manners and elegant education, whom Mr. Law and Mr. Greenleaf had found in Maryland, in great distress and a little disarranged

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 June 1795

    He gave me many details of affairs in France ; a gloomy picture of the reign of terror, and a smiling one of the present reign of moderation ; but he is not without inquietude on the subject of a constitution.

  • letter to Abigail Adams.

    Hague, NED - 29 June 1795

    John Quincy Adams letter to mother... He will not forgive me for having put some truth and justice into his paper.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 28 December 1795

    Mrs. Adams, your new daughter, behaves prettily in her new sphere. I dined with them one day, and promised to take my lodgings with them the next time. Mrs. Adams showed me an elegant bed, which she politely said she had made up for me.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 January 1796

    The President appears great in Randolph's vindication throughout, excepting that he wavered about signing the treaty, which he ought not to have done one moment.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 January 1796

    THIS is one of my red letter days. It is the anniversary of the signature of the declaration of an armistice between the United States and Great Britain in 1783. There are several of these days in my calendar, which I recollect as they pass in review

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 January 1796

    The southern gentry are playing, at present, a very artful game, which I may develope to you in confidence hereafter, under the seal of secrecy.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 January 1796

    YESTERDAY I came to the Senate, as usual on a Monday morning pleasing my imagination and my heart with the hope and expectation of a letter from my dearest friend. No letter for the Vice President!

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 February 1796

    IT is Monday, the time to expect the eastern mail. Other men have letters, I have none. Humiliated and mortified, and, at the same time, irritated, I feel sometimes a disposition to abuse the post offices

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 February 1796

    I don t love slight, neglect, contempt, disgrace, nor insult, more than others. Yet I believe I have firmness of mind enough to bear it like a man, a hero, and a philosopher.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 February 1796

    There is a Dr. somebody here from Connecticut, who pretends, with an instrument made of some kind of metal or composition of metals, by a sort of mesmerian rubbing, or stroking, or conjuration, to cure rheumatisms, headaches, pleurisies, and I know n

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 February 1796

    The subject which you think will excite all their feelings is well known to every body in public life, but is talked of by nobody but in confidence.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 February 1796

    My mother's relief from her fears respecting her arm is a great pleasure to me. I hope to see her in good health in June. Have you given her my barrel of flour ?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 February 1796

    I DINED yesterday with Mr. Madison. Mrs. Madison is a fine woman, and her two sisters are equally so.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 March 1796

    YESTERDAY the President sent his carriage for me to go with the family to the theatre. The Rage and the Spoiled Child were the two pieces. It rained and the house was not full.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 12 March 1796

    I DINED yesterday with Mr. Burr, who lives here in style. A number of members of the House, the Speaker Mr. Dayton, among the rest.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 March 1796

    I COVET the harp of Amphion. What would I not give for the harp of Amphion ?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 March 1796

    I cannot see a ray of hope before June. If the House should be frenzical, we must sit till next March, and leave it to the people to decide by choosing a new President, Senate and House

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 March 1796

    After dinner the gentlemen drew off after the ladies, and left me alone with the President in close conversation. He detained me there till nine o clock, and was never more frank and open upon politics.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 April 1796

    I am so fatigued and disgusted with the insipidity of this dull life, that I am half of a mind to vow that if Washington don t resign, I will. The old hero looks very grave of late.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 April 1796

    I DINED on Monday at the Presidents with young La Fayette and his preceptor, tutor or friend, whatever they call him, whose name is Frestel.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 April 1796

    They have appointed committees to correspond with the merchants in all the seaports. I expect that the citizens will also be called together in the state house yard and it is said that the gentlemen will turn out

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 April 1796

    THE sensations of 19th April, 1775, and those of this morning, have some resemblance to each other. A prospect of foreign war and civil war in conjunction, is not very pleasant.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 April 1796

    The charming letter from our son I return. I know very well all his meaning. He will see man kind in his youth.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 April 1796

    The proceedings of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia now, compared with their in temperate folly last July or August, is a curious specimen of negotiations with foreign courts and nations by the people at large in town meetings.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 May 1796

    THE result of Saturday's debate in the House of Representatives removes all anxiety for the remainder of this session, and leaves me at liberty to ask leave to go home.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Stratford, CT - 27 November 1796

    It will purify me from all envy of Mr. Jefferson, or Mr. Pinckney, or Mr. Burr, or Mr. any body who may be chosen President or Vice President.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 December 1796

    Yesterday I dined with the President, in company with John Watts, the king of the Cherokees, with a large number of his chiefs and their wives

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 December 1796

    ENCLOSED are some signal accomplishments of prophecies. Be cool and discreet in your communications of them.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 December 1796

    The President says he must sell something to en able him to clear out. When a man is about retiring from public life, and sees nothing but a ploughshare between him and the grave, he naturally thinks most upon that.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 January 1797

    I DINED yesterday with Dr. Rush, who desired me to send the enclosed oration upon a weak democrat whom he is pleased to call a great philosopher, astronomer and republican.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 January 1797

    ON Tuesday, when I waited, as usual, on Mrs. Washington, after attending the levee, she congratulated me very complaisantly and affectionately on my election, and went farther and said more than I expected.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 January 1797

    Mr. Madison is to retire. It seems the mode of becoming great is to retire. Madison, I suppose, after a retirement of a few years, is to be President or Vice President.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 January 1797

    Dr. Priestley breakfasted with me. I asked him whether it was his opinion that the French would ultimately establish a republican government.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 February 1797

    I HOPE you will not communicate to any body the hints I give you about our prospects ; but they appear every day worse and worse. House rent at twenty- seven hundred dollars a year...

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 February 1797

    I must wait to know whether Congress will do any thing or not to furnish my house. If they do not, I will have no house before next fall, and then a very moderate one, with very moderate furniture.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 March 1797

    YOUR dearest friend never had a more trying day than yesterday. A solemn scene it was indeed, and it was made more affecting to me by the presence of the General,whose countenance was as serene and unclouded as the day.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 9 March 1797

    The President and Mrs. Washington go off this morning for Mount Vernon. Yesterday afternoon he came to make me his farewell visit

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 March 1797

    If I could have my wish, there should never be a show or a feast made for the President while I hold the office. My birthday happens when Congress will never sit, so that I hope it will never be talked of.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 March 1797

    I AM so constantly engaged in business, most of which is new to me, that it seems as if it was impossible to find time to write even to you ; yet I believe I write every post.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 March 1797

    I HOPE to get into the house on Monday next, but shall purchase no nice furniture till you come. I shall make a little establishment for myself and keep bachelors hall for some time.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 April 1797

    You, and such petit maitres and maitresses as you, are forever criticising the periods and diction of such great men as presidents and chief justices. Do you think their minds are taken up with such trifles?

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 May 1797

    Our mother and our niece are gone to rest. The first a fruitfully ripe, the last but a blossom or a bud.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 28 November 1798

    Your company here is much desired by every body, but by none so much as me.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 December 1798

    I pray you to banish as much as possible all gloomy thoughts, and be very cautious to avoid every thing which may endanger a return of your old disorders.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 January 1799

    I don t like this bravery which grows in proportion as danger appears to lessen. I like that fortitude which increases as danger grows, in a good cause.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 January 1799

    Thomas is my delight and I know not how to re sign him ; but as I know you will not be quite well till you see him, I shall consent to his going next week.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 February 1799

    Thomas is to set off from New York to-day for Quincy, and I wish him a pleasant journey, which the fine weather and convenient snow promises.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 February 1799

    I came home and went into a warm bed and had a fine perspiration, occasioned, I believe, by my drinking three glasses of Madeira wine at supper, and. two more after I came home

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Trenton, NJ - 25 October 1799

    An election is approaching which will set us at liberty from these uncomfortable journeys

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Trenton, NJ - 27 October 1799

    I have been, forenoon and afternoon, to church to hear Parson Waddell, who gave us two discourses good and wholesome for soul, body, and estate.

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Washington, MD - 13 October 1800

    I have seen many cities and fine places since you left me, and particularly Mount Vernon. Mrs. Washington and her whole family very kindly inquired after your health

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Washington, MD - 2 November 1800

    I shall say nothing of public affairs. I am very glad you consented to come on, for you would have been more anxious at Quincy than here

  • John Adams letter to Abigail Adams.

    Washington, MD - 16 February 1801

    The election will be decided this day in favor of Mr. Jefferson, as it is given out by good authority.