Letters written to Aaron Burr during the years 1772 thru 1816

Aaron Burr

90 Letters written to Aaron Burr from 12 author(s) including Theodosia Prevost , and Theodosia Alston from places such as Princeton, NJ, Watertown, NY and New Brunswick, NJ. Who did Aaron Burr know?

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  • William Paterson letter to Aaron Burr.

    Princeton, NJ - 17 January 1772

    To see you shine as a speaker would give great pleasure to your friends in general, and to me in particular. I say nothing of your own honour.

  • William Paterson letter to Aaron Burr.

    Princeton, NJ - 26 October 1772

    I always drive through Elizabethtown as quickly as possible, lest the soft infection should steal upon me, or I should take it in with the very air I breathe.

  • Peter Colt letter to Aaron Burr.

    Watertown, NY - 11 September 1775

    I cannot retire to rest till I have written you a few lines, to excuse my casting so many discouragements in the way of your journey to Quebec.

  • William Paterson letter to Aaron Burr.

    New Brunswick, NJ - 22 April 1776

    I was in expectation of hearing frequently from you, and, to tell the truth, was not a little mortified that I was passed over in silence. Why, Burr, all this negligence?

  • Israel Putnam letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 26 July 1776

    I have, agreeably to your desire, waited on his excellency to endeavour to obtain permission for you to go to Staten Island.

  • Israel Putnam letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 14 July 1777

    you are forthwith to repair to Norwalk, Fairfield, and the places adjacent on the Sound, transmit me without delay the intelligence you shall from time to time receive of the movements of the enemy

  • Israel Putnam letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 27 September 1777

    he informs me that General Howe's army had found means to cross Schuylkill several miles below his army...

  • George Washington letter to Aaron Burr.

    Ny - 28 October 1778

    You, in my opinion, carry your ideas of delicacy too far when you propose to drop your pay while the recovery of your health necessarily requires your absence from the service.

  • Richard Platt letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 14 January 1779

    Handcuffs will be sent you as soon as they can be made. If you have a number of prisoners at any time to send up, let them be fastened right and left hands, and the guard cut the strings of their breeches

  • Alexander Mcdougall letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 15 January 1779

    I am much mortified that Captain Brown should have merited your putting him in an arrest. But you have done your duty, for which accept my thanks.

  • Alexander Mcdougall letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 22 January 1779

    There are reasons, which I shall explain to you at a proper time, why ----- should not be sought after.

  • Richard Platt letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 26 January 1779

    He brings with him forty men, I believe as good as any in the army.

  • William Paterson letter to Aaron Burr.

    The Hermitage, NJ - 27 January 1779

    The intelligence gives me real pleasure, and the more so, because, until Mrs. Prevost told me, I had no idea of your disorder being so rooted and dangerous.

  • Alexander Mcdougall letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 6 February 1779

    For the future, order the sentry who does not fire the alarm one hundred lashes, and the like number to any who shall part with his arms without its being wrested from him by the enemy

  • Alexander Mcdougall letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 7 February 1779

    I directed Major Platt, some days since, to inform you, no provision of any kind should be suffered to go below you till further orders.

  • Alexander Mcdougall letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 15 February 1779

    I intend to send down the remains of Colonel Poor's regiment for a few days, to cover a forage making by Mr. Hayes near Mamaroneck; and shall send by them public arms, with bayonets, to be exchanged for yours which want them.

  • Richard Platt letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 23 February 1779

    Cammell will be down shortly to pay off accounts. One dollar per day is allowed for a saddle-horse.

  • Alexander Mcdougall letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 23 February 1779

    Your several favours have been handed to me. I have not time now to answer them fully.

  • Richard Platt letter to Aaron Burr.

    , NY - 25 February 1779

    The general wishes you to detain the best officers and men, for five complete parties of sixty

  • Alexander Mcdougall letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 26 February 1779

    Colonel Putnam is ordered to march and join you, and to act as circumstances shall cast up.

  • Alexander Mcdougall letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 27 February 1779

    At half past ten of the same evening, five boxes of ammunition was sent to you from King's ferry, by water, with orders to keep close in shore, for fear of accidents.

  • Alexander Mcdougall letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 6 March 1779

    Enclosed you have a list of horse-thieves and others who act very prejudicial to our cause. I wish to have them taken and sent up here.

  • Israel Putnam letter to Aaron Burr.

    Horse Neck, CT - 9 March 1779

    The truth of the matter is, that Butler wanted the dragoon to return with the horses, but that he (the dragoon) refused to do...

  • Alexander Mcdougall letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 11 March 1779

    If the militia of Colonel Drake's are good men, arm them of General Paterson's, and I will replace them to him.

  • William Paterson letter to Aaron Burr.

    The Ponds, NJ - 18 March 1779

    I am married, Burr, and happy. May you be equally so. I cannot form a higher or a better wish.

  • Alexander Mcdougall letter to Aaron Burr.

    Peekskill, NY - 20 March 1779

    My late intelligence from New-York and headquarters clearly mark the enemy's intention to make a movement very soon.

  • George Washington letter to Aaron Burr.

    Middlebrook, NJ - 3 April 1779

    Perfectly satisfied that no consideration save a desire to reestablish your health could induce you to leave the service, I cannot therefore withhold my consent.

  • William Paterson letter to Aaron Burr.

    Morristown, NJ - 29 September 1779

    I was for a time in expectation that you would return into Jersey, as the scene of military operations was directed to your part of the world, and would unavoidably drive you from your study and repose.

  • Robert Troup letter to Aaron Burr.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 January 1780

    I almost envy you the happiness you have enjoyed. From the first moment of my acquaintance with Mrs. Prevost and her sister, I conceived an admiration for them both

  • Robert Troup letter to Aaron Burr.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 February 1780

    I have resigned my office, and am now preparing to leave Philadelphia to go to Princeton, agreeable to the plan in my letter by Colonel Wadsworth.

  • Robert Troup letter to Aaron Burr.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 February 1780

    By a strange kind of contracted system, which pervades all the civil establishments of Congress, I was reduced to the necessity of resigning my office at least six weeks sooner than I expected.

  • William Paterson letter to Aaron Burr.

    Rariton, NJ - 14 April 1780

    Peace is distant. There is no prospect of it in the present year. Nor do I think that Britain will come to terms while she fancies herself superior on the ocean.

  • Robert Troup letter to Aaron Burr.

    Princeton, NJ - 27 April 1780

    I shall write to Mr. Stockton, who is still in Philadelphia, and acquaint him with my intentions of going away.

  • Robert Troup letter to Aaron Burr.

    Princeton, NJ - 16 May 1780

    I assure you, my future prosperity and happiness in life depends, in a greater measure than you may imagine, on my living and studying with you

  • Robert Troup letter to Aaron Burr.

    Princeton, NJ - 23 May 1780

    My patience is almost exhausted. I have been waiting for you this month past. Here I am, a pensioner upon the bounty of my good friend General Morris, and am likely to continue so

  • Robert Troup letter to Aaron Burr.

    Baskenridge, NJ - 27 June 1780

    After a very disagreeable ride indeed, I came here the day before yesterday in the afternoon; and yesterday morning, just as I was going to mount my horse, I was seized with a violent fever

  • Peter Colt letter to Aaron Burr.

    Weathersfield, VT - 7 July 1780

    My last informed you of the loss of the Hawk, being chased on shore the back side of Long Island. It was a few days after she went out on her last cruise, and before she had any success.

  • Peter Colt letter to Aaron Burr.

    Weathersfield, VT - 16 July 1780

    It is a good old maxim--be religious, but not superstitious. So respecting health, be exactly attentive, but not whimsical.

  • Robert Troup letter to Aaron Burr.

    Rariton, NJ - 18 July 1780

    I am charmed with my present situation in every respect. It could not be more agreeable to my wishes. I shall have reason to thank you, as long as I live, for my change.

  • Robert Troup letter to Aaron Burr.

    Rariton, NJ - 21 August 1780

    I have no doubt at present that the second division of the French fleet has arrived, with a re-enforcement of 4000 troops.

  • William Paterson letter to Aaron Burr.

    Morristown, NJ - 27 August 1780

    I have always been fond of solitude, and, as it were, of stealing along through life. I am now sufficiently fond of domestic life. I have every reason to be so.

  • William Paterson letter to Aaron Burr.

    Morristown, NJ - 31 August 1780

    Business fairly bears me down. The truth is, that I am tired of writing, tired of reading, tired of bustling in a crowd, and, by fits, heartily tired of myself.

  • Robert Troup letter to Aaron Burr.

    Morristown, NJ - 23 October 1780

    Some evil genius certainly interrupts our correspondence. I write letters without number, and yet you seldom hear from me, and when you do, the letter is as old as if it had come from the other side of the Atlantic.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    Litchfield, CT - 12 February 1781

    Your opinion of Voltaire pleases me, as it proves your judgment above being biased by the prejudices of others. The English, from national jealousy and enmity to the French, detract him.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    Litchfield, CT - 6 March 1781

    How strangely we pass through life! All acknowledge themselves mortal and immortal; and yet prefer the trifles of to-day to the treasures of eternity.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    Litchfield, CT - 0 May 1781

    Our being the subject of much inquiry, conjecture, and calumny, is no more than we ought to expect. My attention to you was ever pointed enough to attract the observation of those who visited the house.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    Sharon, CT - 11 September 1781

    We were obliged to Dr. Cutting for the most pleasing account of your health and spirits. Also, of your great progress in law.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    Albany, NY - 25 March 1783

    Some think absence tends to increase affection; the greater part that it wears it away. I believe neither, but that it only tends to prove how far the heart is capable of loving

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    Albany, NY - 14 August 1783

    When she sleeps, I watch anxiously; when she wakes, anxious fears accompany every motion. I talked of my love towards her, but I knew it not till put to this unhappy test.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 22 February 1784

    My Aaron had scarce quitted the door when I regretted my passiveness. Why did I consent to his departure? Can interest repay the sacrifice?

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 0 April 1785

    I persuade myself this is the last day you spend in Philadelphia.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 0 April 1785

    The family as you left it. Thy Theodosia's health and spirits increase daily. Bartow's industry and utility are striking to the family and strangers.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 0 May 1785

    Your dear little daughter seeks you twenty times a day; calls you to your meals, and will not suffer your chair to be filled by any of the family.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 0 May 1785

    I have a little fever hanging about me, which tends to depress my spirits for the time.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 22 May 1785

    Your dear little Theo. grows the most engaging child you ever saw. She frequently talks of, and calls on, her dear papa.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 28 August 1785

    I really believe, my dear, few parents can boast of children whose minds are so prone to virtue.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 29 August 1785

    Our little daughter's health has improved beyond my expectations.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 25 September 1785

    I was relieved, delighted, till the recollection of the storm you have since weathered took place.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 27 September 1785

    I have counted the hours till evening; since that, the minutes, and am still on the watch; the stage not arrived: it is a cruel delay. Your health, your tender frame, how are they supported!

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 0 August 1786

    If you finish your causes before court is over, cannot you look at us, even should you return to the manor?

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 0 November 1787

    What language can express the joy, the gratitude of Theodosia? Stage after stage without a line. Thy usual punctuality gave room for every fear; various conjectures filled every breast.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 0 November 1787

    My health is better. As I fondly believe this the most interesting intelligence I can give thee, I make it my preamble.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 30 June 1791

    The Edwardses dine with me; they had taken lodgings previous to their arrival, in consequence of a report made them by the little Bodowins ... that my house was too small and inconvenient to admit of a spare bed.

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    Pelham, NY - 23 July 1791

    I was apprehensive travelling in the heat and bad accommodations would check your recovery. Do return home as soon as possible; or, rather, come to Pelham

  • Theodosia Prevost letter to Aaron Burr.

    Pelham, NY - 27 July 1791

    Poor Dr. Wright had his house two days ago burnt to the ground, and all the furniture, with every article of clothing both of themselves and the children.

  • Peggy Gartin letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 3 December 1800

    I have asked James to write to you to know how the venison was to be done; but I will now have it cured as you have ordered.

  • Peggy Gartin letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 17 December 1800

    I have found there is a day-school, kept by an elderly man and his wife, near to our house, and if master is willing that I should go to it for two months, I think it would be of great service to me

  • Peggy Gartin letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 29 December 1800

    there has been a report in the paper that you was wounded, it has made us very uneasy, supposing it to be true; but I hope that it is not so

  • Peggy Gartin letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 12 January 1801

    I was taken sick on the 30th of last month, so that I have not been able to go to school; and as I am better than I have been, to write these few lines

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Clifton, SC - 17 March 1802

    Ever since the date of my last letter, for it was not forwarded till some days after, I have been quite ill; till within these two or three days totally unable to write.

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 4 June 1803

    Encore stupid. For Heaven's sake, what do you imagine I can find to say once a day that is worth saying

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 9 June 1803

    I received yesterday your three letters of the 5th and 6th. They made me laugh, yet I pity you, and have really a fellow feeling for you.

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 10 June 1803

    We have been dining with Mrs. Laight to-day, and have been much amused.

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 June 1803

    Continuation of the Story of the Loves of Reubon and Celeste

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    New York, NY - 14 June 1803

    As to Celeste, 'voila mon' opinion. She meant, from the beginning, to say that awful word-- 'yes'; but not choosing to say it immediately, she told you that 'you' had furnished her with arguments against matrimony

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Ballston, NY - 20 July 1803

    On arriving here we found that your letter to H. Walton had not been received; but we have been very fortunate in getting a house entirely to ourselves

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Washington, MD - 16 October 1803

    We arrived here yesterday somewhat fatigued. I was, however, very happy to find myself at Washington

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Petersburgh, NC - 21 October 1803

    I confess I feel myself growing quite cross on the journey, and it is really to be feared that, unless we soon finish it, the serene tranquillity of my placid temper may be injured.

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Clifton, SC - 29 October 1803

    Thank Heaven, my dear father, I am at Lumberton, and within a few days of rest.

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Clifton, SC - 8 November 1803

    But you, who always put the best construction on my words and deeds, will allow, that a place in which we have suffered much and run a risk of suffering more must be unpleasant.

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Charleston, SC - 19 November 1803

    those pretty little playthings from D. M'Kinnon delighted me. I looked at them over and over, with as much pleasure as a miser over his hoard.

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Clifton, SC - 1 December 1803

    My health is infinitely improved, and I attribute it to nothing but the continual bustle I have been kept in for three weeks past.

  • Theodosia Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Clifton, SC - 10 December 1803

    Behold me again at Clifton; and, in good truth, I begin to be cloyed with the delights of bustle.

  • Harman Blennerhassett letter to Aaron Burr.

    unknown - 18 December 1805

    Estimating the value of your reflections on the view you have taken of the western country, and particularly of Louisiana, I have thought it of great importance to obtain your sentiments

  • Harman Blennerhassett letter to Aaron Burr.

    Philadelphia, PA - 28 November 1807

    I have reflected, with much concern, on an observation which fell from you yesterday ; namely, that my account was not a small one, and that you had not yet examined it.

  • Joseph Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    , SC - 26 July 1812

    he who was to have redeemed all your glory, and shed new lustre upon our families--that boy, at once our happiness and our pride, is taken from us-- 'is dead'. We saw him dead. My own hand surrendered him to the grave

  • Joseph Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Columbia, SC - 19 January 1813

    To-morrow will be three weeks since, in obedience to your wishes, Theodosia left me. It is three weeks, and not yet one line from her. My mind is tortured.

  • Joseph Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    , SC - 25 February 1813

    It was there, in the chamber of my wife, where every thing was disposed as usual; with the clothes, the books, the play-things of my boy around me, that I sustained this second shock, doubled in a manner that I could not account for.

  • Harman Blennerhassett letter to Aaron Burr.

    Port Gibson, MS - 16 April 1813

    I hasten to acquaint you that I should prefer suing them directly, in the character of your assignees, for the amount of the advance you made to them, in bills rendered negotiable by my indorsement

  • Joseph Alston letter to Aaron Burr.

    Charleston, SC - 16 February 1816

    I fully coincide with you in sentiment; but the spirit, the energy, the health necessary to give practical effect to sentiment, are all gone. I feel too much alone, too entirely unconnected with the world, to take much interest in any thing.