Aaron Burr Letters for the years 1774 thru 1816

Aaron Burr

Aaron Burr wrote 275 Letters from a total of 41 locations including Litchfield, CT, New York, NY, and Kingsbridge, NY. Aaron Burr wrote a total of 31 people including Theodosia Alston, and Theodosia Prevost. Most of Aaron Burr's letters were written in the year 1804. Several other letters were written in 1802 and 1803. Who did Aaron Burr know?

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  • sponsored contentAaron Burr letter to Alexander Hamilton.

    New York, NY - 21 June 1804

    Political opposition can never absolve gentlemen from the necessity of a rigid adherence to the laws of honour and the rules of decorum. I neither claim such privilege nor indulge it in others.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Matthias Ogden.

    Litchfield, CT - 14 August 1774

    Before I proceed any further, let me tell you that, a few days ago, a mob of several hundred persons gathered at Barrington

  • Aaron Burr letter to Matthias Ogden.

    Litchfield, CT - 11 September 1774

    I wrote you last Thursday, and enclosed one of the songs you desired, which was all I could then obtain.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Matthias Ogden.

    Litchfield, CT -

    Your happiness, Matt., is really almost the only present thing I can contemplate with any satisfaction...

  • Aaron Burr letter to Matthias Ogden.

    Litchfield, CT - 2 February 1775

    I have now and then an affair of petty gallantry, which might entertain you if you were acquainted with the different characters I have to deal with...

  • Aaron Burr letter to Matthias Ogden.

    New York, NY - 18 January 1776

    There is in man a certain love of novelty; a fondness of variety (useful, indeed, within proper limits), which influences more or less in almost every act of life.

  • Aaron Burr letter to William Paterson.

    New York, NY - 26 July 1776

    Can it be that you have still in memory the vagrant Burr?

  • Aaron Burr letter to T Edwards.

    New York, NY - 10 August 1776

    Our six galleys which went up the North river attacked the British ships.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Edwards.

    Kingsbridge, NY - 26 September 1776

    It has been always held a maxim that our island and seaport towns were at the discretion of the tyrant of Great Britain.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Matthias Ogden.

    Princeton, NJ - 7 March 1777

    As to expectations of promotion, I have not the least, either in the line or the staff.

  • Aaron Burr letter to George Washington.

    Peekskill, NY - 21 July 1777

    I was this morning favoured with your excellency's letter of the 29th ult., and my appointment to Colonel Malcolm's regiment.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Thomas Conway.

    White Marsh, PA - 0 November 1777

    The papers and clothing of the companies which have lately joined Malcolm's regiment are at Bethlem.

  • Aaron Burr letter to unknown.

    Camp - 10 April 1778

    In my weekly returns, your lordship may have observed that Captain Tom has been returned--absent without leave.

  • Aaron Burr letter to George Washington.

    Elizabethtown, PA - 28 October 1778

    The excessive heat and occasional fatigues of the preceding campaign, have so impaired my health and constitution as to render me incapable of immediate service.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Alexander Mcdougall.

    White Plains, NY - 12 January 1779

    The enclosed return will show you the deficiency of officers and men at this post.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Alexander Mcdougall.

    White Plains, NY - 13 January 1779

    Sir, till now, I never wished for arbitrary power. I could gibbet half a dozen good whigs, with all the venom of an inveterate tory.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Malcolm.

    White Plains, NY - 21 January 1779

    A commissary of hides at this place can furnish me with shoes as I want them, if you will give an order for that purpose.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Alexander Mcdougall.

    White Plains, NY - 29 January 1779

    The same gentleman brought me a re-enforcement of thirty-nine privates, and a proportion of officers.

  • Aaron Burr letter to George Washington.

    Phillipsburgh, PA - 10 March 1779

    I find my health unequal to the undertaking, and have acquainted him of my intentions to retire. He has ordered an officer to relieve me before the 15th of March...

  • Aaron Burr letter to Robert Troup.

    Fairfield, CT - 15 February 1780

    I go to-morrow to Middletown, from whence I shall hasten my departure as much as possible.

  • Aaron Burr letter to William Patterson.

    Middletown, CT - 16 February 1780

    He is a better antidote for the spleen than a ton of drugs.

  • Aaron Burr letter to R Alden.

    Rariton, NJ - 15 February 1781

    If law is your object, this situation is favourable to the pursuit. You shall have access to the library and office, without the customary expense.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 5 June 1781

    That mind is truly great which can bear with equanimity the trifling and unavoidable vexations of life, and be affected only by those events which determine our substantial bliss.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Morris.

    Albany, NY - 21 October 1781

    I do myself the honour to enclose you several letters, which were intended, I believe, to introduce me to your acquaintance, perhaps to your friendship.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 3 December 1781

    I am surprised I forgot to advise you to get a Franklin fireplace. They have not the inconvenience of stoves, are warm, save wood, and never smoke.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 23 December 1781

    Remember to write me facts and ideas, and don't torment me with compliments, or yourself with sentiments to which I am already no stranger.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 0 April 1785

    Have you not been tormented with some embarrassments which I wickedly left you to struggle with?

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    , SC - 0 May 1785

    Our cavalcade is most fortunately composed. Some who abhor fatigue, others who admire good fare, by which by which combination we ride slow and live well.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Chester, SC - 0 May 1785

    I then contemplate nothing so eagerly as my return; amuse myself with ideas of my own happiness, and dwell on the sweet domestic joys which I fancy prepared for me.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Chester, SC - 0 May 1785

    I strayed this morning for an hour or two in the woods, where I lay on a rock to enjoy the wild retreat.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Chester, SC - 0 May 1785

    Appearances are hostile; they talk of twenty or twenty-five days at least. I believe I shall not hold out so long.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Chester, SC - 12 May 1785

    I bear the fatigues of our business to admiration. Have great appetite, and sleep sound about ten hours a night. I am already as black as a Shawanese.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Chester, SC - 19 May 1785

    We have this day begun the examination of witnesses, which, together with the arguments, will keep us the greater part, and probably the whole, of next week.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Chester, SC - 20 May 1785

    Our witnesses are so aged, and many so remote, that they will not be in till Monday, so that, at this rate, we shall eke out the whole of next week.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 30 October 1785

    I have suffered myself to be engaged in two land causes (Van Hoesen and Van Rensselaer), which begin to-morrow, and will probably last the whole week.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 2 November 1785

    Our trial, of which I wrote you on Sunday, goes on moderately. It will certainly last till twelve o'clock on Saturday night; longer it cannot, that being the last hour of court.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 0 August 1786

    Why are you so cautiously silent as to our little Sally? You do not say that she is better or worse; from which I conclude she is worse.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 0 August 1786

    We began our Catskill causes this morning, and have this minute adjourned to meet at seven in the morning. We shall be engaged at the same disagreeable rate till Saturday evening.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 28 June 1788

    As the boys will wish to know something of the progress of business here, tell them that the cause of Freer and Van Vleeck has been this day put off by the defendants

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Poughkeepsie, NY - 29 June 1788

    I have sat an hour at the door watching the arrival of the stage. At length it comes, and your dear packet is handed to me just in season to be acknowledged by Mr. Johnstone.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 7 August 1788

    I should have told you that I am speaking of Fort Johnson, where I have spent a day. From this amiable bower you ascend a gentle declivity, by a winding path, to a cluster of lofty oaks and locusts.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 26 October 1788

    The headache with which I left New-York grew so extreme, that finding it impossible to proceed in the stage, the view of a vessel off Tarrytown, under full sail before the wind, tempted me to go on board.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 0 November 1788

    My return seems daily more distant, but not to be regretted from any views but those of the heart.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 23 November 1788

    Your account of the progress of the measles is alarming. I am pleased to find that you yet keep your ground.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 26 November 1788

    I am wearied out with the most tedious cause I was ever engaged in.

  • Aaron Burr letter to George Clinton.

    Albany, NY - 25 September 1789

    In case the office you were pleased to propose should be offered to me, I have, upon reflection, determined to accept it...

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 21 October 1789

    I have this moment received your letter of Sunday evening, containing the account of your alarming accident and most fortunate rescue and escape.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 24 October 1789

    Your misfortunes so engrossed me, that I forgot to inquire about Augustine's horses; and to give a caution, which I believe is needless, about the blank checks.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 28 October 1789

    The distressing circumstances respecting your face must certainly be owing to something more than the mere misfortune of your burn.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Claverack, NY - 27 June 1791

    It is surprising that you tell me nothing of Theo. I would by no means have her writing and arithmetic neglected.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 17 July 1791

    I hope Theo. will learn to ride on horseback. Two or three hours a day at French and arithmetic will not injure her. Be careful of green apples, &c.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Albany, NY - 31 July 1791

    I anticipate with increasing impatience the hour of leaving this place, and am making every possible exertion to advance it.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 October 1791

    I receive many attentions and civilities. Many invitations to dine, &c. All of which I have declined, and have not eaten a meal except at my own quarters.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 30 October 1791

    The old lady is deaf, and upon my first coming to take possession of my lodgings, she with great civility requested that I would never attempt to speak to her, for fear of injuring my lungs without being able to make her hear.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 November 1791

    You mistake the nature of my emotions. They had nothing of asperity; but it is useless to explain them.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 November 1791

    John Watts took me yesterday a long walk, and, though fatigued, I was not exhausted. He takes every occasion to show me friendship and attention.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 1 December 1791

    Enclosed in Bartow's last letter came one which, from the handwriting, I supposed to be from that great fat fellow, Colonel Troup.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 December 1791

    To render any reading really amusing or in any degree instructive, you should never pass a word you do not understand, or the name of a person or place of which you have not some knowledge.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 December 1791

    Tell Bartow that I have this evening received his letter by Vining, who arrived in town last Monday. Beg him never again to write by a private hand about business when there is a post.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 December 1791

    I wish you would continue to give me any fugitive ideas or remarks which may occur to you in the course of your reading; and what you call your rattling way is that of all others which pleases me the most.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 December 1791

    Will it not be possible for you to meet me at Trenton, that we may travel together to New York? If you assent to this, I will name a day. Yet do not expose your health.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 27 December 1791

    If I had, before I left New York, sufficiently reflected on the subject, I would never have consented to this absurd and irrational mode of life.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 January 1792

    Mr. Trumbull is good enough to engage to deliver this.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 19 February 1792

    You may expect a host of such falsehoods as that about the Indian war. I have not been offered any command.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Jacob De Lamater.

    New York, NY - 15 June 1792

    You will, before this can reach you, have heard of the event of the late election. Some questions having arisen among the canvassers respecting the returns from Clinton, Otsego, and Tioga, they requested the advice of Mr. King and myself.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    West Chester, PA - 8 October 1792

    I rose up suddenly from the sofa, and rubbing my head--What book shall I buy for her? said I to myself. She reads so much and so rapidly that it is not easy to find proper and amusing French books for her

  • Aaron Burr letter to Jacob De Lamater.

    New York, NY - 30 October 1792

    We may make use of both keys or ciphers, and if some of the persons or things are designated by different characters, no inconvenience will arise

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 January 1793

    By the enclosed to Mr. Gurney, I have requested him to write me a letter respecting the health of the family, and Theo.'s improvement.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 February 1793

    You may recollect that I left a memorandum of what Theo. was to learn. I hope it has been strictly attended to.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 15 February 1793

    Boys and girls are generally educated much in the same way till they are eight or nine years of age, and it is admitted that girls make at least equal progress with the boys; generally, indeed, they make better.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 February 1793

    You have heard me speak of a Miss Woolstonecraft, who has written something on the French revolution; she has also written a book entitled Vindication of the rights of Woman.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 February 1793

    Deliver him the enclosed. I hope it may animate his attention; and tell him, if you think proper, that I shall be much dissatisfied if Theo.'s progress in Latin be not very considerable at my return.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 February 1793

    It would indeed have been a pity that such a letter should have been lost. There is something in the style and arrangement of the words which would have done honour to a girl of sixteen.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 February 1793

    If the whole performance was your own, which I am inclined to hope and believe, it indicates an improvement in style, in knowledge of the French, and in your handwriting.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 December 1793

    my time is consumed in the dull uniformity of study and attendance in Senate; but every hour of your day is interesting to me.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Prevost.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 December 1793

    Since being at this place I have had several conversations with Dr. Rush respecting your distressing illness, and I have reason to believe that he has given the subject some reflection.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 25 December 1793

    When you have finished a letter, read it carefully over, and correct all the errors you can discover.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 December 1793

    It is said that some few yet die of the yellow fever which lately raged here; but the disorder does not appear to be, at present, in any degree contagious

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 December 1793

    What -- can neither affection nor civility induce you to devote to me the small portion of time which I have required? Are authority and compulsion then the only engines by which you can be moved?

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 4 January 1794

    The account of your mamma's health distresses me extremely. If she does not get better soon, I will quit Congress altogether and go home.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 January 1794

    You write acurate for accurate; laudnam for laudanum; intirely for entirely; this last word, indeed, is spelled both ways, but entirely is the most usual and the most proper.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 January 1794

    Since the receipt of these letters I have been three times to Doctor Rush to consult him about a drink for your mamma; but not having had the good fortune to find him, have written to him on the subject.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 January 1794

    I fear that you will imagine that I have been inattentive to your last request about Dr. Rush; but the truth is, I can get nothing satisfactory out of him.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 January 1794

    Doctor Rush says that he cannot conceive animal food to be particularly necessary; nourishment is the great object.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 14 January 1794

    I really think, my dear Theo., that you will be very soon beyond all verbal criticism, and that my whole attention will be presently directed to the improvement of your style.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 January 1794

    I fear, my dear little girl, that my letter of the 13th imposed too much upon you; if so, dispense with what you may find too troublesome.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 January 1794

    Be able, upon my arrival, to tell me the difference between an infusion and decoction; and the history, the virtues, and the botanical or medical name of the bark.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 13 February 1794

    I despair of getting genuine Tent wine in this city. There never was a bottle of real unadulterated Tent imported here for sale. Mr. Jefferson, who had some for his own use, has left town.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 March 1794

    For the last month I have been very much occupied by public business.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 31 March 1794

    I shall in a few days (this week) send you a most beautiful assortment of flower-seeds and flowering shrubs. If I do not receive a letter from you to-morrow, I shall be out of all patience.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 June 1794

    I have received my dear Theo.'s two little, very little, French letters. The last left you tormented with headache and toothache

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 4 August 1794

    It was with great pain and reluctance that I made this journey without you. But your manners are not yet quite sufficiently formed to enable you to do justice to your own character

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 14 August 1794

    To the young ladies, you may pretend business or engagements: avoid, however, giving any offence to your companions. It is the manner of a refusal, much more than the refusal, which gives offence.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 16 August 1794

    Another post has arrived, and brought me no letter from you. It is the last omission which I shall readily pardon

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 18 August 1794

    On the 13th you say you got nine pages in Lucian. It was, to be sure, a most surprising lesson.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Troy, NY - 21 August 1794

    Your letters are my only consolation during this afflicting absence--for it is to me a real affliction. I have forborne to express to you my impatience, lest it should increase yours.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 21 December 1794

    Go on, my dear girl, and you will become all that I wish.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 5 January 1795

    Some weeks ago Mrs. Jackson was polite enough to call on you, with Miss Jackson and Miss Brown, who left you cards. You have never returned the visit. I beg you to do it without delay.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Bristol, PA - 14 September 1795

    Saturday night I lodged at Elizabethtown, and, after two wettings, dined on Sunday with General Freelinghuysen.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 17 September 1795

    But to return to the subject of manners, &c. I have often seen Madame at table, and other situations, pay you the utmost attention; offer you twenty civilities, while you appeared scarcely sensible

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 23 September 1795

    I write from the house of our friends, Law and Duncanson, where I make my home. Miss Duncanson, who is mistress of the house, is a very sprightly, sensible, ladylike woman.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 25 September 1795

    Since Tuesday last I have been here much against my will; arrested by high command; performing quarantine by authority not to be questioned or controverted. In plain English, I am sick.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 8 February 1796

    What will you think of the taste of New-York when I shall tell you that Miss Broadhurst is not very generally admired here?

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 January 1797

    When I write to you oftener than your turn, you must not let it be known, or there will be jealousy.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 23 January 1797

    You must not puzzle all day, my dear little girl, at one hard lesson. After puzzling faithfully one hour, apply to your arithmetic, and do enough to convince the doctor that you have not been idle.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Thomas Morris.

    New York, NY - 1 February 1797

    I have been informed that the present sheriff of Dutchess either has resigned or will decline a reappointment, and that Platt Smith is among the candidates.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 4 January 1799

    Your despondency distresses me extremely. It is indeed unfortunate, my dear Theodosia, that we are constrained to be separated.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 11 February 1799

    You now see that a letter can come from New-York in three days; a truth which has been frequently verified by the receipt of my letters, but never before by the despatch of your own.

  • Aaron Burr letter to unknown.

    New York, NY - 6 October 1799

    I cannot refuse to the manner of your request, nor to the friendly motives which have produced it, to satisfy your inquiries with regard to Witbeck's bond and the Holland Company.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Trenton, NJ - 2 January 1800

    Your letters amuse me; your recovery rejoices me; your determination not to torment yourself is neither from philosophy nor spleen

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 26 January 1800

    The ideas, of which you are the object, that daily pass through my mind, would, if committed to writing, fill an octavo volume

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 29 January 1800

    We have agreed that the cause of Le Guen shall come on next Tuesday.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 30 January 1800

    Our most humiliating errors proceed usually from inattention, and from that mental dissipation which we call heedlessness.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 13 February 1800

    I pray you never to write to me with the mere motive of getting rid of the task. These performances always lead me to fear that all other tasks are performed in the same manner

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 15 February 1800

    The argument of the cause of Le Guen is concluded. I fear that I must wait for the final decision of the court before I can leave Albany.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 5 March 1800

    But--but--these buts--how they mar all the fine theories of life!

  • Aaron Burr letter to Charles Biddle.

    New York, NY - 20 July 1800

    if I had but one son, I think I should place him in the navy.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 15 January 1801

    We are about to begin our journey to Albany.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Albany, NY - 17 February 1801

    You are to wait in Baltimore, until I overtake you, which will be on the 28th at the latest.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 8 March 1801

    Would Mr. Alston be willing to go as secretary to Chancellor Livingston?

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 11 March 1801

    Your Dumfries letter was received yesterday. To pass a day in Dumfries is what you could not at any time very much desire

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 29 March 1801

    The ferrymen pronounced it to be impossible to pass with horses, and unsafe to attempt it. By the logic of money and brandy I persuaded them to attempt it.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 15 April 1801

    The ship South Carolina is now in port, and will sail on Monday next. I wish to take passage in her; but a thousand concerns of business and obstacles of various kinds appear to oppose.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 27 April 1801

    Our election commences to-morrow, and will be open for three days.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 29 April 1801

    I had like to have forgotten to say a word in reply to your inquiries of matrimony, which would seem to indicate that I have no plan on the subject. Such is the fact.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 26 May 1801

    Who should present himself a few days ago but A. Burr Reeve. He has come, with the consent of his father, to pass some weeks with me--more astonishment.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 20 August 1801

    I was so very solicitous that you should see Niagara, that I was constantly filled with apprehension lest something might prevent it. Your letter of the 29th of July relieves me.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Thomas Morris.

    New York, NY - 18 September 1801

    Mr. Vanderlyn, the young painter from Esopus, who went about six years ago to Paris, has recently returned

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Albany, NY - 15 October 1801

    Our Convention met on Tuesday the 13th, and will probably continue in session five or six days longer.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 3 November 1801

    You made two, perhaps more conquests on your Northern tour--King Brandt and the stage-driver; both of whom have been profuse in their eulogies.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 9 November 1801

    It is quite consoling to find that you will have taken the precaution to inquire the state of health before you venture your precious carcass into Charleston

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 15 November 1801

    That, in New-England, men should be found hardy enough to oppose, in public speeches, the recommendation of a thanksgiving sanctioned by the usage of one hundred and fifty years

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 20 November 1801

    From appearance, she has been used to count her beads and work hard, and never thought of love or finery.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 26 November 1801

    The great business, as you are pleased to call it, has brought me hither.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 8 December 1801

    Your interesting letter of the 23d is this day received. It brings me to the familiar acquaintance with your amiable circle, and admits me to your fireside more than any thing you have written.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 13 December 1801

    Herewith is enclosed a duplicate of the bill of lading, specifying the articles shipped for you on board the Protectress

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 15 December 1801

    Yesterday Mr. Phelps, mentioned in the enclosed, delivered to me two pairs of moccasins, directed-- From Captain Joseph Brandt to Mr. and Mrs. Alston.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 12 January 1802

    Your letters which greet me here are of the 2d and 20th of December only; only two.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 16 January 1802

    Good venison is not to be had at this season, and to send indifferent any thing (except a wife) from New-York, would be treason.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 22 January 1802

    Five weeks without hearing from you! Intolerable. Now I think to repose myself in sullen silence for five weeks from this date.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Barnabas Bidwell.

    Washington, MD - 1 February 1802

    The newspapers will have shown the position of the bill now before the Senate for the repeal of the act of last session establishing a new judiciary system

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 2 February 1802

    she talks a great deal about you; the substance of it is, that you are an ugly, little, lazy, stupid, good-for-nothing knurle, and that she is very sorry she ever wrote you a line.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Washington, MD - 2 February 1802

    The repeal of the judicial system of 1801 engrosses the attention of both houses of Congress. The bill is yet before the Senate.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 21 February 1802

    A few lines from Mr. Alston, received some days before, advised me of your journey to Clifton, and of the distressing occasion.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 22 February 1802

    You women: it is so with you all. If one wishes to exhibit the best side, one must provoke you. Gratify your wishes and expectations, or, still worse, anticipate them, and it produces a lethargy.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 23 February 1802

    I project, as you may have understood, a journey southward at some time, yet nameless, during the current year (or century).

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 26 February 1802

    Your newspapers of the same date, and also of the 15th, contain particulars of the races; but so technically expressed that I comprehend nothing of it.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 27 February 1802

    Last evening Eustis happened in my room while I was at Smith's (opposite); he saw the cover of your letter, and the few lines which it contains.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 4 March 1802

    You have supposed it to be from malice that I have not written you of the adjournment and of my intentions.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Washington, MD - 8 March 1802

    I learn, with a good deal of regret, that the mountain plan is abandoned; at least, that no measures are taken or meditated for its execution.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 8 March 1802

    At the moment of closing your letter, this scrap of a newspaper caught my eye, and is sent for your amusement.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 8 March 1802

    I discover that you write on Sunday only; that if, by accident or mental indisposition, to which people in warm climates are liable, the business should be put off for that day, it lays over to the next Sunday

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 14 March 1802

    It is probable that the box went with the ship which took your first cargo; but, as no one paid the least attention to the landing of the articles, nor to compare the delivery with the invoice, it may have been left on board.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 19 March 1802

    By the "attack on Sullivan's Island" was intended an attack on the plan of residence.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 5 April 1802

    and thus happens what, I believe, has never before occurred, that I have two of your letters unanswered, those of the 19th and 22d, both affecting and interesting.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 12 April 1802

    The instability of all human concerns has been a theme of remark for the last 4000 years.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Clifton, SC - 3 May 1802

    Unfortunately, the stage was full--not even a seat vacant for the vice-president. I am, therefore, doomed to remain here one day longer

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 3 July 1802

    I desired your father to bring or send a barrel of rough rice (rice unpounded).

  • Aaron Burr letter to Natalie Sumter.

    New York, NY - 5 July 1802

    Your letter of the 22d of February, announcing your intended marriage, is this minute received.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 19 July 1802

    You will herewith receive the second book. The malice and the motives are in this so obvious, that it will tend to discredit the whole.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 2 August 1802

    The enclosed paper will give you the particulars of the affair of Swartwout and Clinton. You will perceive that the latter indirectly acknowledges that he is an agent in the calumnies against me.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 8 August 1802

    By Tuesday the 9th inst. I shall be settled at Richmond Hill, ready to receive you and your incumbrances.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 8 September 1802

    The debility and loss of appetite which your wife has experienced alarmed me; yet I was totally ignorant of the cause.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 15 October 1802

    To the execution of any project, however, health is a sine qua non. Whether you can ever enjoy it in Charleston, or on Sullivan's Island has become a problem in my mind.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 5 November 1802

    Would Charles Lee accept the place of secretary of the Senate? It is worth twenty-three hundred dollars per annum, and not laborious.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 4 December 1802

    So you arrived on the 24th, after a passage of ten days; you and the Charleston, packet on the same day.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 16 December 1802

    This is not by way of reproach, for it is an unpleasant truth that, for the last six or eight weeks, the Charleston, mail has been twenty days on the way.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 26 January 1803

    You know (or am I now to tell you) that you and your concerns are the highest, the dearest interest I have in this world; one in comparison with which all others are insignificant.

  • Aaron Burr letter to John Coats.

    Washington, MD - 23 February 1803

    I thank you for this instance of your goodness; for your friendly recollection; above all, for the justice you do to my heart and feelings.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 June 1803

    I am weary, and so must you be, of this story of Reubon and Celeste. It is, however, closed, and you will, after this letter, hear no more of it.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 June 1803

    Send me the number of volumes of the American Encyclopedia. I wish to complete the set, and must, therefore, know the deficiencies.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 5 June 1803

    Pray no more apologies about your stupidity, &c., because on that subject I am perfectly informed.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 6 June 1803

    The plot thickens, and I do not find it possible to communicate faithfully the details, without hazarding too much in case of loss of the letter.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 7 June 1803

    As you were informed yesterday, my 'Celeste' has gone with the family (le pere excepted) to pass a fortnight six miles from town.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 8 June 1803

    It is finished--concluded--for ever abandoned-- 'liber sum'. Celeste never means to marry

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 June 1803

    Just as I sit down to write to you I receive a note from Celeste, advising me that she is in town for a few hours, and will be happy to see me.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 16 June 1803

    The birthday must be kept. It shall be "honoured by my presence." You will therefore make your preparations

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 30 July 1803

    Some obscure hints in one of your letters have saddened my heart. From 'son pere' I have merited neither suspicion nor reserve.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Providence, RI - 1 August 1803

    All those you saw when you were last here inquire about you with great civility and interest, and say pretty things of you. Don't be vain, madam, for I take this to be a kind of flattery to me, or to be so intended.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 6 August 1803

    Lord, how I should have liked to see you dance. It is so long; how long is it? It is certain that you dance better than anybody and looked better.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 8 August 1803

    But of the deaths. We die reasonably fast. Six or eight new cases reported yesterday. Of those who take the fever three fourths die.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 7 November 1803

    This is the first time that I have put pen to paper at you; but I have been too busy, selling. All is sold, and well sold; not all, however. The house, outhouses, and some three or four acres remain.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 22 November 1803

    Mr. Astor left with me some days ago for Mr. Alston a very beautiful map of Lower Canada, price 'ten' dollars, and two views of Montreal and its vicinity, 'two guineas'.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 4 December 1803

    These letters are very satisfactory, except on the article of your health; of that you must speak a little more plainly.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 6 December 1803

    You are a good girl to write so often. Oh, yes! I knew how much of a child you were when I sent the pretty things.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 9 December 1803

    When any thing amuses me, my first thought is whether it would not also amuse you; and the pleasure is but half enjoyed until it is communicated.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 27 December 1803

    Indeed, indeed, my dear little Theodosia, I will write to you very soon. Don't scold and pout so, and I will tell you 'how' I visited Annapolis, and 'how' I returned about an hour ago.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Charles Biddle.

    Washington, MD - 2 January 1804

    It may be satisfactory to you to know, 'officially', that James is favourably spoken of, and is in estimation with the government.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 3 January 1804

    This is only to assure you that I am in perfect health. That General Jackson is my good friend; that I have had no duel nor quarrel with anybody, and have not been wounded or hurt.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Peggy Gartin.

    Washington, MD - 4 January 1804

    Make the master teach you arithmetic, so that you may be able to keep the accounts of the family.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 4 January 1804

    How could I forget to tell you the very important event of the marriage of Jerome Bonaparte with Miss Patterson.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 17 January 1804

    I want a French translation of the Constitution of the United States, and, for the purpose, send you a copy in English. It will, I fear, be a great labour to you; but I cannot get it done here

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Washington, MD - 18 January 1804

    I have been greatly flattered by the applauses bestowed on your speech at Columbia. Send me half a dozen copies. Why have you not already done it?

  • Aaron Burr letter to Charles Biddle.

    Washington, MD - 20 January 1804

    It is seriously my intention to visit you next week, if I can get away, which will depend a little on the state of business in Senate.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Charles Biddle.

    Washington, MD - 23 January 1804

    When I last wrote you (about Thursday, I think), I felt the approaches of a headache, which I concluded would be, as usual, the torment of twenty-four hours only. On the contrary, it has pursued me without intermission.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 25 January 1804

    I have been a week confined to my room by a headache, but there are no mortal or alarming symptoms.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Natalie Sumter.

    Washington, MD - 25 January 1804

    Theodosia has given me a detailed account of yourself and your lovely little girl. All as I could wish.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Natalie Sumter.

    Washington, MD - 27 January 1804

    You will be proud, as a New-Yorker, to see that the first attempt to create a taste for painting and sculpture has been made in our city. We have about forty busts and groups.

  • Aaron Burr letter to A.r. Ellery.

    Washington, MD - 29 January 1804

    The bill, or project of law, herewith enclosed, is now under debate in the Senate. You will, therefore, consider it as a project merely, not yet a law.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 29 January 1804

    There is no end to the trouble such a baggage gives me. Another thing occurs, which, forsooth, must be sent to her too.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Havre De Grace, MD - 30 January 1804

    In a former letter I told you we had eight inches snow at Washington. On Saturday last, 28th, fell six or eight inches more, so that we had a foot depth of snow

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 16 February 1804

    Goldsmith is the very book I should have recommended. A critical knowledge of historical events may assist a statesman or form a pedant.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Baltimore, MD - 21 February 1804

    The roads were so very bad that I sent back Sam, George, and the horses from Trenton, and came on in the mail stage 'sans valet'.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Thomas Sumter.

    Washington, MD - 27 February 1804

    Yet great as is my solicitude to see your wife and child, to renew my acquaintance with you, to tender you my friendship and affection, and to claim a return, I would by no means urge a measure inconsistent with your interest.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Charles Biddle.

    Washington, MD - 3 March 1804

    It cannot yet be settled whether there will be commissioners to run the boundary line with Spain; but I will mention the thing to the Smiths, who still profess friendship for General Wilkinson.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Frederic Vanderkemp.

    Washington, MD - 6 March 1804

    It affords me great pleasure to learn that you are engaged in a literary pursuit so congenial with your taste and your talents.

  • Aaron Burr letter to William Van Ness.

    Washington, MD - 7 March 1804

    Friday last was the day assigned for the appearance of Judge Pickering on his impeachment. He did not appear

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 10 March 1804

    The plan of summer operations is to go from Philadelphia, to Fort Pitt (Pittsburg,), thence through the states on each side of the Ohio.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 28 March 1804

    They are very busy here about an election between Morgan Lewis and A. Burr. The former supported by the Livingstons and Clintons, the latter 'per se'.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 3 April 1804

    The History of Frederic II. will amuse you. You will read Montesquieu with interest and instruction.

  • Aaron Burr letter to unknown.

    New York, NY - 18 April 1804

    Your vanity, if in any degree concerned, will be fully satisfied by the assurance that my heart, my wishes, and my thoughts will be with you.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 25 April 1804

    I, too, write in a storm; an election storm, of the like you have once been a witness. The thing began yesterday, and will terminate to-morrow.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 1 May 1804

    The election is lost by a great majority: 'tant mieux'. It does not appear possible that I should make you a visit; even if La G. should not prevent it, which ought to be hoped, some other thing of like kind will.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 8 May 1804

    The affair of La G. is becoming serious. After due reflection, this does appear to me to be the most discreet thing--prudence, cheerfulness, and good-temper are ingredients of importance. I will offer homage.

  • Aaron Burr letter to unknown.

    New York, NY - 20 May 1804

    I send you a sample of that species of philosophy which I have thought particularly suited to your cast of mind and the delicacy of your taste. You are to read from the 66th page to the 125th.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 11 June 1804

    I have studied every pothook and trammel of his first literary performance, to see what rays of genius could be discovered.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 13 June 1804

    Another interview yesterday with La G. One more would be fatal and final. I shall seek it to-day; 'after which' I will read Moore's fables, you impudence.

  • Aaron Burr letter to unknown.

    New York, NY - 18 June 1804

    I send for your perusal a letter signed Charles D. Cooper, which, though apparently published some time ago, has but very recently come to my knowledge.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 28 June 1804

    To-morrow, did I say? 'Tis nowhere to be found but in the fool's calendar' and yet I said "to-morrow." The morrow brought me an ague in the face, which I have been nursing from that day to this, in great ill-humour.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 1 July 1804

    You may recollect, and, if you do not, your husband will, that he has several times requested me to open a correspondence between him and my bookseller in London.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 10 July 1804

    You will find enclosed a statement of my affairs. Swartwout and Van Ness are joint executors with you and Theodosia.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    New York, NY - 10 July 1804

    Having lately written my will, and given my private letters and papers in charge to you, I have no other direction to give you on the subject but to request you to burn all such as, if by accident made public, would injure any person.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 13 July 1804

    GENERAL HAMILTON died yesterday. The malignant federalists or tories, and the imbittered Clintonians, unite in endeavouring to excite public sympathy in his favour

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 18 July 1804

    The event of which you have been advised has driven me into a sort of exile, and may terminate in an actual and permanent ostracism.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 20 July 1804

    I shall journey somewhere within a few days, but whither is not yet decided. My heart will travel southward, and repose on the hills of Santee.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 July 1804

    Swartwout, Van Ness, and others are secreted. How long this sort of persecution may endure cannot be conjectured.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 2 August 1804

    Don't let me have the idea that you are dissatisfied with me a moment. I can't just now endure it. At another time you may play the Juno if you please.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 August 1804

    I absent myself from home merely to give a little time for passions to subside, not from any apprehension of the final effects of proceedings in courts of law.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 3 August 1804

    I am further advised that an application has been made to Governor Lewis, of New-York, requiring him to demand me of the governor of this state, with which Lewis will most probably be obliged to comply.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 August 1804

    My plan is to visit the Floridas for five or six weeks. I have desired Theodosia to consult you whether there be any healthy point within a hundred miles or so of St. Simons at which we might meet.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 11 August 1804

    I shall lay a plan for meeting you somewhere, but whether I may have it in my power to visit the high hills of Santee is doubtful; I fear improbable.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Hampton, GA - 28 August 1804

    I am at the house of Major Butler, comfortably settled. A very agreeable family within half a mile. My project is to go next week to Florida, which may take up a fortnight or ten days

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Hampton, GA - 31 August 1804

    I am now quite settled. My establishment consists of a housekeeper, cook, and chambermaid, seamstress, and two footmen.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Hampton, GA - 3 September 1804

    Mr. Morse informs you that this island is forty-five miles long, and that it lies north of the mouth Altamaha, commonly spelled Alatamaha.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Frederica, GA - 15 September 1804

    Having very unexpectedly procured a boat, I left my house yesterday afternoon, came hither by land, and proceed in a few minutes for St. Mary's.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Hampton, GA - 26 September 1804

    I returned yesterday from my Florida excursion, about which I wrote you on the 15th inst. The weather prevented me from going farther than the river St. John's, about thirty miles from St. Augustine.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Savannah, GA - 1 October 1804

    I have been this morning scouring the town and the docks in quest of ways and means to get on. There is a packet which will sail for Charleston, on Saturday

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Fayetteville, GA - 23 October 1804

    No more pauses, not even for weather, till Richmond, distant two hundred miles, and proposed to be travelled in five days.

  • Aaron Burr letter to unknown.

    Warrenton, GA - 27 October 1804

    The morning following I started one hour before day, the moon showing us the way, and, at about seven or eight in the evening, was at Raleigh, being full fifty miles.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Richmond, VA - 31 October 1804

    Virginia is the last state, and Petersburgh the last town in the state of Virginia, in which I should have expected any open marks of hospitality and respect.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Petersburgh, GA - 31 October 1804

    description

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Washington, MD - 5 November 1804

    My house and furniture have been sold for about twenty-five thousand dollars. Seven or eight thousand dollars of debts remain unpaid.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 7 November 1804

    But when I deliberated about writing, it was with a view to write you sense--grave sense. What a dull thing is sense. How it mars half the pleasure of life, and yet how contemptible is all that has it not.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Washington, MD - 29 November 1804

    The boy, too, has a relapse of the ague, a disease of all others the most fatal to the infant constitution. Great God! what sacrifices do you make, and to what end?

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 4 December 1804

    You have doubtless heard that there has subsisted for some time a contention of a very singular nature between the states of New-York, and New-Jersey.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Washington, MD - 15 December 1804

    The trial of Judge Chace will not come on before the middle of January. He is summoned to appear the 2d January.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 31 December 1804

    I propose to move my quarters to-morrow, and the confusion has already commenced, and even pervades this letter.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 15 January 1805

    One motive, however, lays down at the bottom of my heart, and has scarcely, as yet, been avowed to myself. You will conjecture, and rightly, that I mean Celeste.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 28 January 1805

    You treat with too much gravity the New-Jersey affair. It should be considered as a farce, and you will yet see it terminated so as to leave only ridicule and contempt to its abettors.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 23 February 1805

    Your last letters are written with more correctness, and apparently with more attention than is your habit. They have amused and pleased me much.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Washington, MD - 13 March 1805

    I made a talk, as was decent and proper, to the Senate on leaving them formally. There was nothing written or prepared, except that it had been some days on my mind to say something.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 22 March 1805

    I am not wholly free from apprehension that you take no interest in any thing but a rice-field. Fame says that you are about to degenerate into a mere planter.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 March 1805

    People who are occupied are never dull, never melancholy. I learn, then, from your letter of the 10th, that you have been a little lazy.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Philadelphia, PA - 10 April 1805

    I rejoice that your nerves are in better tone, for truly, in some of your letters, I could scarcely recognise my daughter.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Pittsburg, PA - 30 April 1805

    Arrived in good order yesterday. Find my boat and hands ready. The water high and weather fine. Shall set off in two hours.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Lexington, KY - 23 May 1805

    I have been received with much hospitality and kindness, and could stay a month with pleasure; but General Andrew Jackson. having provided us a boat, we shall set off on Sunday, the 2d of June, to navigate down the Cumberland

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Washington, MD - 15 April 1806

    The confidence you have been pleased to place in me is extremely flattering, and it would seem that there has been, without explanation, a sort of consent between our minds.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Baltimore, MD - 17 May 1806

    The mountain part of my project is for the health of my daughter, who has just come on from South Carolina, to pass the season with me.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Philadelphia, PA - 24 July 1806

    Let me find you at home, or not far off, I propose to pass two or three days with you.

  • Aaron Burr letter to James Wilkinson.

    Philadelphia, PA - 29 July 1806

    Our project, my dear friend, is brought to a point so long desired. Burr guarantees the result with his life and honor, with the lives, and honor, and the fortunes of hundreds, the best blood of our country.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Bedford, PA - 15 August 1806

    I leave here my daughter and her son, who have both greatly profited by the use of the waters, or, what is perhaps more probable, by the mountain air.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Lexington, KY - 6 November 1806

    Yesterday, Mr. Jos. Davis, the district attorney of the United States, made an application to the federal court at Frankfort, for a warrant to apprehend me for treasonable practice, or on some suspicion thereof.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Nashville, KY - 20 December 1806

    I have experienced distressing delays ; but shall be at the mouth of the Cumberland on the 23d, Sunday. Please to repair thither.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Coumbia River - 27 December 1806

    We will endeavor to start all the heavy boats at an early hour in the morning : those below are to wait till those above shall come down.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Theodosia Alston.

    Richmond, VA - 27 March 1807

    My military escort having arrived at Fredericksburgh on our way to Washington, there met a special messenger, with orders to convey me to this place.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Richmond, VA - 21 May 1807

    Mr. Tyrrell will tell you of all the strange things which are passing here. Of the bills, the first which you indorsed has been paid by Mr. Alston.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Richmond, VA - 29 June 1807

    I recommend to you to place Mrs. Blennerhassett and your children with Mrs. Alston, till these agitations shall be composed.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Richmond, VA - 4 August 1807

    Mr. Alston and Mr. Neville successively made attempts to see you at the tavern, but were denied.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Richmond, VA - 5 August 1807

    I am much gratified, my dear sir, by your letter and notes. It is impossible for us to communicate freely, except through the intervention of counsel.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Richmond, VA - 9 August 1807

    I perceive the advantages from your presence, but am not at this moment able to decide whether the thing be practicable.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Richmond, VA - 27 August 1807

    Mr. Luckett and I have an unsettled account to a considerable amount. He holds a bill indorsed by you.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    Richmond, VA - 1 September 1807

    It seems that some misapprehension exists on the subject of the bill held by Mr. Luckett.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Harman Blennerhassett.

    York - 9 March 1813

    I have been searching but in vain for something to enlighten me as to the nature of the action which you would propose to bring against Wilkins

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 15 November 1815

    A congressional caucus will, in the course of the ensuing month, nominate James Monroe for President of the United States, and will call on all good republicans to support the nomination.

  • Aaron Burr letter to Joseph Alston.

    New York, NY - 16 October 1816

    At some other time I may give you, in detail, a sketch of the sad period which has elapsed since my return. For the present, it will suffice to say that my business affords me a decent support.