Battle of Quebec during the American Revolution

Battle of Quebec during the American Revolution

The Battle of Quebec was an attempt in 1775, by American colonial rebels to capture the Canadian city of Quebec and enlist French Canadian support for the American Revolutionary War.

Filters

  • sponsored contentBenedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Fort Western, ME - 25 September 1775

    I found the bateaux completed, but many of them smaller than the directions given, and very badly built ; of course I have been obliged to order twenty more, to bring on the remainder of the provisions

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 6 August 1775

    Immediately on my arrival here, I issued such orders respecting the provisions and stores, (which I found had been most scandalously embezzled or misapplied,) as I hoped would effectually have brought matters into a right train

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 31 July 1775

    Since my last I have been most assiduously employed in preparing materials for building boats to convey me across the Lake.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 27 August 1775

    on my arrival at Saratoga, I received information, that a large body of Indians of the Six Nations were to be here on Tuesday last, and that my presence was indispensably necessary.

  • David Wooster letter to George Washington.

    Oyster Ponds, NY - 29 August 1775

    The inhabitants here think that, had General Schuyler known their very exposed situation, he would not have ordered the companies away. The New York Congress suppose they have no right to counteract his orders.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 31 August 1775

    General Montgomery leaves Crown Point to-day, with twelve hundred men and four twelve-pounders. I follow him this evening

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Janet Livingston.

    Isle Aux Noix, CAN - 5 September 1775

    We have made an excursion to St. Johns with the small corps with which I left Ticonderoga.

  • Peter Colt letter to Aaron Burr.

    Watertown, NY - 11 September 1775

    I cannot retire to rest till I have written you a few lines, to excuse my casting so many discouragements in the way of your journey to Quebec.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Janet Livingston.

    Isle Aux Noix, CAN - 12 September 1775

    I am, my dear Janet, so exceedingly out of spirits and so chagrined with the behavior of the troops, that I most heartily repent having undertaken to lead them.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Philip Schuyler.

    St Johns, QC, CAN - 19 September 1775

    Yesterday, I marched, with five hundred men, to the north side of St. John's, where we found a party of the King's troops, with field-pieces.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 20 September 1775

    We approached half a mile nearer and then landed without opposition, in a close, deep swamp, which extended to very near the fort. Here we formed, and marched in the best order we could towards the fort, to reconnoitre.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 26 September 1775

    If Job had been a General in my situation, his memory had not been so famous for patience. But the glorious end we have in view, and which I have confident hope will be attained, will atone for all.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Philip Schuyler.

    St Johns, QC, CAN - 28 September 1775

    Since my last of the 24th, we have opened a battery of two twelve-pounders, upon the ship-yards and schooner. She was obliged immediately to haul near the wharf, or rather as near the north end of the fort as she could get

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Janet Livingston.

    St Johns, CAN - 6 October 1775

    Little change has happened since my last. I still wait for reinforcement ; the troops have hitherto gone home sick, almost as fast as they came.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Philip Schuyler.

    St Johns, QC, CAN - 6 October 1775

    Your vigilance and foresight have saved us from the difficulties that threatened us. We are no longer afraid of starving.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Janet Livingston.

    St Johns, CAN - 9 October 1775

    This evening I received my dear Janet's three letters to the 23rd September, which bring me the agreeable news of your recovery.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 12 October 1775

    I am extremely apprehensive that a want of powder will be fatal to our operations. I have sent Express to Albany and New York, but have not yet learnt whether I shall be supplied or not.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Philip Schuyler.

    St Johns, QC, CAN - 13 October 1775

    Some time ago I informed you of my intentions to make my approaches on the west side, as soon as the expected reenforcement enabled me to undertake it.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Kennebec River, ME - 13 October 1775

    The men in general not understanding bateaux, have been obliged to wade, and haul them more than half way up the river.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Guy Carleton.

    St Johns, QC, CAN - 22 October 1775

    I have received information, from different quarters, that the prisoners you have made are treated with cruel and unnecessary severity, being loaded with irons

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 26 October 1775

    The reduction of Chamblee will, in all probability, be followed by that of St. John's, especially as General Montgomery has now a supply of powder

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Preston.

    St Johns, QC, CAN - 1 November 1775

    Having now acquitted my conscience, I must, to save time and prevent trouble, acquaint you, if you do not surrender this day, it will be unnecessary to make any future proposals.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Philip Schuyler.

    St Johns, QC, CAN - 3 November 1775

    I have the pleasure to acquaint you the garrison surrendered last night. This morning, we take possession ; to-morrow, I hope the prisoners will set off.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 6 November 1775

    Should success crown our endeavours at St. John's, of which there seems to be little doubt, the entire reduction of Canada will, in all probability, be the consequence

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Richard Montgomery.

    St Marie, QC, CAN - 8 November 1775

    I can only say we have hauled our bateaux up over falls, up rapid streams, over carrying-places, and marched through morasses, thick woods, and over mountains, about three hundred and twenty miles

  • Richard Montgomery letter to unknown.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 12 November 1775

    My anxiety for the fate of Montreal induces me to request, that you will exert yourselves among the inhabitants to prevail on them to enter into such measures as will prevent the necessity of opening my batteries on the town.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to unknown.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 12 November 1775

    The city of Montreal, having neither ammunition, artillery, troops, nor provisions, and having it not in their power to fulfil one article of the treaty, can claim no title to a capitulation.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Janet Livingston.

    Montreal, CAN - 13 November 1775

    This morning the Bostonians have marched into town ; the Governor, with his small garrison, having abandoned it two nights since, and retired towards Quebec

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 13 November 1775

    This morning we have taken possession of the town ; I send you their articles of capitulation, with my answer, and hope it may meet with approbation.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Richard Montgomery.

    Point Levy, QC, CAN - 13 November 1775

    The winds have been so high, these three nights, that I have not been able to cross the river. I have near forty canoes ready

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Hector Cramahe.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 14 November 1775

    The unjust, cruel, and tyrannical acts of a venal British Parliament, tending to enslave the American Colonies, have obliged them to appeal to God and the sword for redress.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Richard Montgomery.

    Colvil Place, QC, CAN - 14 November 1775

    I wrote you yesterday from Point Levy, by an express sent from Sorel, by Colonel Easton, of my intention of crossing the St. Lawrence, which I happily effected between nine and four in the morning

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Richard Montgomery.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 16 November 1775

    I am very anxious to hear from you, and much more to see you here.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 19 November 1775

    I have this morning had another express from Colonel Arnold, acquainting me he has crossed the river to the Quebec side ; that he had been near surprising the town ; that it was closely invested

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Point-aux-trembles, QC, CAN - 20 November 1775

    It was judged prudent, in our situation, not to hazard a battle, but retire to this place, eight leagues from Quebec, which we did yesterday, and are waiting here with impatience the arrival of General Montgomery

  • Benedict Arnold letter to Richard Montgomery.

    Point-aux-trembles, QC, CAN - 20 November 1775

    upon examination, great part of our cartridges proved unfit for service, and, to my great surprise, we had no more than five rounds for each man, and near one hundred muskets unfit for service.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Janet Livingston.

    Montreal, CAN - 24 November 1775

    The other day General Prescott was so obliging as to surrender himself and fourteen or fifteen land officers, with above one hundred men, besides sea officers and sailors, prisoners of war.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 24 November 1775

    It is with great indignation I hear Lieutenant Halsey, whom I left as Assistant Engineer at St. John's, to put the barracks in a proper state for the reception of a garrison, has run away without leave

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Ticonderoga, NY - 28 November 1775

    The evening before General Montgomery landed on the Island of Montreal, Mr. Carleton embarked his garrison on board of some vessels and small craft, and made two attempts to pass our batteries

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 5 December 1775

    I continued at Point-aux-Trembles until the 3d instant, when, to my great joy, General Montgomery joined us, with artillery, and about three hundred men.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Janet Livingston.

    Quebec, CAN - 5 December 1775

    I suppose long ere this we have furnished the folks of the United Colonies with subject-matter of conversation. I should like to see the long faces of my Tory friends.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Abraham, QC, CAN - 5 December 1775

    The season has proved so favorable as to enable me to join Colonel Arnold at Point-aux-Trembles, where I arrived with the vessels Mr. Prescott made us a present of.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Guy Carleton.

    Abraham, QC, CAN - 6 December 1775

    notwithstanding the cruelty you have shown to the unhappy prisoners you have taken, the feelings of humanity induce me to have recourse to this expedient to save you from the destruction which hangs over your wretched garrison.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to David Wooster.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 16 December 1775

    Yesterday we opened a battery of five guns and a howitzer, and, with very little effect, I attempted to summon the Governor by a flag of truce. He would not receive any letter.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 18 December 1775

    I have been near a fortnight before Quebec, at the head of upwards of eight hundred men ; a force, you will say, not very adequate to the business in hand.

  • Richard Montgomery letter to Philip Schuyler.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 26 December 1775

    I then had reason to believe the troops well inclined for a coup-de-main. I have since discovered, to my great mortification, that three companies of Colonel Arnold's detachment are very averse from the measure.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to David Wooster.

    , QC, CAN - 31 December 1775

    I make no doubt but General Montgomery acquainted you with his intentions of storming Quebec as soon as a good opportunity offered.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to David Wooster.

    , QC, CAN - 2 January 1776

    I wrote you, three days since, of our defeat, and the death of General Montgomery and others, with all the information I then had of the matter.

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 5 January 1776

    now or never is the time for every virtuous American to exert himself in the cause of liberty and his country ; and that it is become a duty cheer fully to sacrifice the sweets of domestic felicity, to attain the honest, and glorious end America has

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 11 January 1776

    The disposition of the Canadians is very favorable to your wishes ; the only bar of consequence is Quebec. As this is the key, so, in a great measure, it governs the whole country, who having been so long habituated to slavery

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 12 January 1776

    General Wooster has acquainted me he cannot leave Montreal, but has sent down Colonel Clinton, to whom I shall resign the command, until my wound will permit my doing duty

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Albany, NY - 13 January 1776

    My amiable friend, the gallant Montgomery, is no more ; the brave Arnold is wounded; and we have met with a severe check in an unsuccessful attempt on Quebec.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 14 January 1776

    Our loss and repulse struck an amazing panic into both officers and men, and, had the enemy improved their advantage, our affairs here must have been entirely ruined.

  • David Wooster letter to George Washington.

    Montreal, QC, CAN - 21 January 1776

    I herewith inclose a letter just received from Colonel Arnold, and take this opportunity most heartily to condole with you for the loss of the brave and most amiable General Montgomery

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 24 January 1776

    It is very probable the city would surrender before half, or perhaps one quarter, of the shot, shells, &c. in my memorandum were expended; but, if they should make an obstinate resistance, perhaps the whole will be necessary.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to unknown.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 1 February 1776

    I have the pleasure of acquainting you, that we still hold our ground before Quebec, and keep the enemy closely blockaded, though we have received but a small reenforcement of one hundred and fifty men from Montreal.

  • Benedict Arnold letter to George Washington.

    Quebec City, QC, CAN - 27 February 1776

    The enemy, to the number of about five hundred, have twice sallied out at Palace Gate, with design of seizing our field-pieces

  • Philip Schuyler letter to George Washington.

    Fort George, NY - 12 April 1776

    All is in readiness to move, as soon as the Lakes open, which, I hope, will be in a day or two.